Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 17085

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Institute of Food Science, National Council of Research (ISA-CNR), Via Roma 64, 83100 Avellino, Italy
Interests: volatile organic compounds (VOCs); head space solid phase micro-extraction (HS SPME); gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); electronic nose; food quality; food safety; plant response to abiotic stress; packaging and/or storage conditions; innovative crops pre-treatment; modified and controlled atmosphere; logistic cold chain; innovative transport system; no-destructive systems for quality evaluation of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables; sensorial evaluation of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables; consumer acceptability based on the sensory properties of food
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a crucial role in the development of food aroma, which is the primary attribute for consumers’ acceptability. Scientific evidence suggests that odor is the main parameter that defines the quality of foods, since it acts as a signal of the presence of edible or inedible food even before the consumer sees the food. Different VOC patterns are obtained depending on cultivars, geographical origin, and different pre- and postharvest treatments or storage conditions, contributing to the discrimination of foodstuff in different sensory qualities. Recent studies have established that specific VOCs can enhance the flavor perception in plant-origin food, evaluating the overall acceptance by the statistical correlations among sensory attributes, assessed by a consumer panel, and analytical data, including the VOC profile.

In this context, this Special Issue of Foods invites you to send novel contributions concerning any aspect related to the monitoring of the VOC profile with the aim of contributing to identifying possible signature metabolites (biomarkers) or patterns able to guarantee desirable aromatic characteristics to consumers, to meet expectations in a specifically targeted consumer market and ensuring the highest possible quality.

Prof. Dr. José Sousa Câmara
Dr. Rosaria Cozzolino
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant origin food
  • spices
  • beverages
  • volatile organic compounds
  • microextraction techniques
  • HS-SPME/GC-MS
  • electronic nose
  • flavour and aroma
  • odour and odour threshold
  • odour activity values
  • consumer acceptability
  • fresh and fresh-cut vegetables
  • genotype
  • geographical origin
  • packaging
  • pre and postharvest treatments
  • food quality/safety/authenticity
  • data statistical treatment

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 2394 KiB  
Article
Yeast Strain Influences the Hop-Derived Sensory Properties and Volatile Composition of Beer
by Ashly Kumar, Andrea Warburton, Patrick Silcock, Phil J. Bremer and Graham T. Eyres
Foods 2023, 12(5), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12051064 - 02 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1690
Abstract
The perception of hop-derived flavour in beer is not well understood, particularly regarding the effect that different yeast strains and fermentation parameters have on perceived hop aroma and the mechanisms responsible for these changes. To evaluate the influence of yeast strain on the [...] Read more.
The perception of hop-derived flavour in beer is not well understood, particularly regarding the effect that different yeast strains and fermentation parameters have on perceived hop aroma and the mechanisms responsible for these changes. To evaluate the influence of yeast strain on the sensory properties and volatile composition of beer, a standard wort, late-hopped with New Zealand Motueka hops (5 g·L−1), was fermented with one of twelve yeast strains under constant conditions (temperature and yeast inoculation rate). The bottled beers were evaluated using a free sorting sensory methodology, and their volatile organic compounds (VOC) were assessed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) sampling. Beer fermented with SafLager W-34/70 yeast was associated with a hoppy flavour attribute, whereas WY1272 and OTA79 beers were sulfury, and WY1272 was also metallic. WB06 and WLP730 beers were perceived to be spicy, with WB06 beer also perceived as estery, whereas VIN13 beer was sour, and the WLP001 beer was astringent. Beers fermented using the twelve yeast strains had clearly distinct VOC profiles. Beer made with WLP730, OTA29, SPH, and WB06 yeasts had the highest 4-vinylguaiacol levels, which contributed to their spicy attribute. Beer made with W3470 had high levels of nerol, geraniol, and citronellol, which supported its sensory characterisation as being ‘hoppy’. This research has illustrated the important role that yeast strain has on modulating hop flavour in beer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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14 pages, 331 KiB  
Article
Effect of Rigor Stage and Pressurisation on Lipid Damage, Total Volatile Amine Formation and Autolysis Development in Palm Ruff Stored on Ice
by José M. Malga, Teresa Roco, Alfonso Silva, Gipsy Tabilo-Munizaga, Mario Pérez-Won and Santiago P. Aubourg
Foods 2023, 12(4), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12040799 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1102
Abstract
The effect of the rigor stage (pre or post) and previous high-pressure processing (HPP; 450 and 550 MPa for 3 min) was checked during the storage on ice of farmed palm ruff (Seriolella violacea). Fish processed in pre-rigor conditions led [...] Read more.
The effect of the rigor stage (pre or post) and previous high-pressure processing (HPP; 450 and 550 MPa for 3 min) was checked during the storage on ice of farmed palm ruff (Seriolella violacea). Fish processed in pre-rigor conditions led to higher and lower levels (p < 0.05) of moisture and lipid contents in chilled fish, respectively, when compared to their counterpart samples processed in the post-rigor stage. Pre-rigor fish showed a higher (p < 0.05) quality level than post-rigor samples according to the assessment of the K value (59.0–92.1 and 70.3–96.3 ranges, respectively), fluorescent compounds (0.29–1.11 and 0.37–1.90 ranges, respectively), free fatty acids (FFA) (15.1–188.0 and 33.8–232.5 g·kg−1 lipids ranges, respectively), and total volatile amines (216.3–387.6 and 217.7–412.2 g·kg−1 muscle ranges, respectively). Pressure-treated fish showed higher (p < 0.05) quality retention than non-treated samples according to the formation of fluorescent compounds (0.29–0.86 and 0.85–1.90 ranges, respectively), FFA (15.1–50.6 and 58.9–223.5 g·kg−1 lipids ranges, respectively), and total volatile amines (216.3–250.3 and 351.1–412.2 g·kg−1 muscle ranges, respectively) and the evolution of the K value (59.0–77.2 and 86.9–96.3 ranges, respectively). The use of pre-rigor fish and previous HPP is recommended for the commercialisation of the current species as a fresh product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
14 pages, 1508 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Ultrasound Treatment in Winemaking on the Volatile Compounds of Aglianico, Nero di Troia, and Primitivo Red Wines
by Giuseppe Natrella, Mirella Noviello, Antonio Trani, Michele Faccia and Giuseppe Gambacorta
Foods 2023, 12(3), 648; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030648 - 02 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1545
Abstract
An ultrasound (US) treatment was applied during the vinification of three different red grape cultivars with the aim of assessing the impact on the volatile profile of the wines. A robust solid phase micro extraction coupled with gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) method was [...] Read more.
An ultrasound (US) treatment was applied during the vinification of three different red grape cultivars with the aim of assessing the impact on the volatile profile of the wines. A robust solid phase micro extraction coupled with gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) method was developed in order to fix the best parameters for optimizing the volatile organic compound (VOC) recovery. A 15% NaCl solution was added to the samples to increase the salting-out effect, the time/temperature were appropriately selected, and the matrix effect was evaluated by comparing synthetic and real matrices. In addition, external calibration curves were used to quantify the single volatile compounds. The analyses of the wine samples at 7 and 14 months of aging revealed that US exerted the highest effect on Aglianico, which had the highest amount of total VOC. US Nero di Troia showed similar results after 14 months of aging, while Primitivo was not affected by the treatment. Nevertheless, from discriminant analysis, a clear separation was observed between the control and ultrasound-treated wines for all three cultivars, with ethyl decanoate, ethyl isopentyl succinate, and butyric acid having the highest discriminant coefficients. In conclusion, the obtained results indicated that the effect of US treatment on the VOC profile of the wine considered in the experimentation is cultivar-dependent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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15 pages, 1719 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Volatile Compounds, Composition, and Thermal Behavior of Coffee Beans According to Variety and Roasting Intensity
by Thomas Dippong, Monica Dan, Melinda Haydee Kovacs, Emoke Dalma Kovacs, Erika Andrea Levei and Oana Cadar
Foods 2022, 11(19), 3146; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11193146 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4080
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the ways in which the thermal behavior, composition, and volatile compound contents of roasted coffee beans depend on variety and roasting intensity. The thermal analysis revealed various transformations in coffee composition, namely, drying, water loss, and decomposition of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the ways in which the thermal behavior, composition, and volatile compound contents of roasted coffee beans depend on variety and roasting intensity. The thermal analysis revealed various transformations in coffee composition, namely, drying, water loss, and decomposition of polysaccharides, lipids, amino acids, and proteins. The results showed that volatile compounds are released differently in coffee depending on coffee type and degree of roasting. The most abundant volatile compounds present in the samples were 2-butanone, furan, 2-methylfuran, methyl formate, 2.3-pentanedione, methylpyrazine, acetic acid, furfural, 5-methyl furfural, and 2-furanmethanol. The total polyphenol contents ranged between 13.3 and 18.9 g gallic acid/kg, being slightly higher in Robusta than in Arabica varieties and in more intensely roasted beans compared to medium-roasted beans. The Robusta variety has higher mineral contents than Arabica, and the contents of most minerals (K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, P, N, and S) increased with roasting intensity. Discrimination between coffee varieties and roasting intensities is possible based on mineral and polyphenol contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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26 pages, 1007 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Volatile Compounds Contributing to Flavor of Wild Lowbush (Vaccinium augustifolium) and Cultivated Highbush (Vaccinium corymbosum) Blueberry Fruit Using Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry
by Charles F. Forney, Songshan Qiu, Michael A. Jordan, Dylan McCarthy and Sherry Fillmore
Foods 2022, 11(16), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11162516 - 20 Aug 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2024
Abstract
The flavor of blueberry fruit products is an important parameter determining consumer satisfaction. Wild lowbush blueberries are primarily processed into products, but their flavor chemistry has not been characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the aroma chemistry of lowbush blueberries [...] Read more.
The flavor of blueberry fruit products is an important parameter determining consumer satisfaction. Wild lowbush blueberries are primarily processed into products, but their flavor chemistry has not been characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the aroma chemistry of lowbush blueberries and compare it with that of highbush. Aroma volatiles of lowbush blueberries from four Canadian provinces and five highbush blueberry cultivars were isolated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and characterized using gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and 2-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF-MS). Lowbush fruit volatiles were composed of 48% esters, 29% aldehydes and 4% monterpenoids compared to 48% aldehydes, 26% monoterpenoids and 3% esters in highbush fruit. Twenty-three aroma-active peaks were identified in lowbush compared to forty-two in highbush fruit using GC-O. The most aroma-active compounds in lowbush fruit were ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, methyl 2-methylbutanoate, methyl 3-methylbutanoate, ethyl 3-methylbutanoate and ethyl propanoate compared to geraniol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, 1-octen-3-one, α-terpineol and linalool in highbush fruit. The aroma volatile composition was more consistent among lowbush fruit samples than the five highbush cultivars. Aroma-active GC-O peaks were described more frequently as “floral”, “fruity”, “sweet” and “blueberry” in lowbush than in highbush fruit. Results suggest wild lowbush blueberries would provide “fruitier” and “sweeter” flavors to food products than cultivated highbush fruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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12 pages, 3690 KiB  
Article
Volatile Compounds Analysis and Biomarkers Identification of Four Native Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) Cultivars Grown in Xinjiang Region of China
by Cai Zhao, Jinkui Sun, Xilei Pu, Xuewei Shi, Weidong Cheng and Bin Wang
Foods 2022, 11(15), 2297; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11152297 - 01 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
Flavor (odor and taste) have a significant role in the consumer’s acceptance, and volatile compounds are responsible for the odor of apricots. In the present work, headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS) together with multivariate analysis, i.e., [...] Read more.
Flavor (odor and taste) have a significant role in the consumer’s acceptance, and volatile compounds are responsible for the odor of apricots. In the present work, headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS) together with multivariate analysis, i.e., partial least square discrimination analysis (PLS-DA), were applied to construct the volatile fingerprints and biomarkers of apricots in Xinjiang, China. As a result, a total of 63 volatile substances were identified in the fruits of four apricot cultivars, seven of which were considered to serve as volatile biomarkers, which are damascenone for Dabaiyou apricots; acetophenone, myrcenol and 7-hexadecenal for Luopuhongdaike apricots; 2,4-dimethyl-cyclohexanol for You apricots; eucalyptol and salicylaldehyde for Xiaobai apricots. Moreover, Xiaobai apricots were richer in soluble sugars, organic acids and total phenolic and total flavonoid content than the other three apricot varieties. This work helps to characterize the volatile profiles and biomarkers of different apricot cultivars while providing theoretical guidance for developing apricot-flavored foods in practical production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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14 pages, 2779 KiB  
Article
Comprehensive Evaluation of the Volatomic Fingerprint of Saffron from Campania towards Its Authenticity and Quality
by Rosaria Cozzolino, Matteo Stocchero, Rosa Perestrelo and José S. Câmara
Foods 2022, 11(3), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030366 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2337
Abstract
The volatile profiles of eight saffron samples (seven cultivated and one spontaneous) grown in different geographical districts within the Campania region (southern Italy) were compared. Using headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS), overall, 80 volatiles were identified in the eight [...] Read more.
The volatile profiles of eight saffron samples (seven cultivated and one spontaneous) grown in different geographical districts within the Campania region (southern Italy) were compared. Using headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS), overall, 80 volatiles were identified in the eight landraces. Among them, safranal and its isomers and other related compounds such as isophorones, which are not only key odorants but also pharmacologically active metabolites, have been detected in all the investigated samples. Principal Component Analysis performed on the volatiles’ compounds revealed that the spontaneous sample turned out to be an outlier. In particular, the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) profile of the spontaneous saffron presented four lilac aldehydes and four lilac alcohol isomers, which, to the authors’ knowledge, have never been identified in the volatile signature of this spice. The multivariate statistical analysis allowed the discrimination of the seven cultivate saffron ecotypes in four well-separated clusters according to variety. Moreover, 20 VOCs, able to differentiate the clusters in terms of single volatile metabolite, were discovered. Altogether, these results could contribute to identifying possible volatile signature metabolites (biomarkers) or patterns that discriminate saffron samples grown in Campania region on a molecular basis, encouraging future biodiversity programs to preserve saffron landraces revealing valuable genetic resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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Review

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17 pages, 1925 KiB  
Review
Bibliometric Review on the Volatile Organic Compounds in Meat
by Qianlin Ni, Nicolò Amalfitano, Franco Biasioli, Luigi Gallo, Franco Tagliapietra and Giovanni Bittante
Foods 2022, 11(22), 3574; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223574 - 10 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1799
Abstract
Meat flavor is an important aspect of meat quality that also influences consumer demand, and is therefore very important for the meat industry. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) contribute in large part to the flavor of meat, and while increasing numbers of articles are [...] Read more.
Meat flavor is an important aspect of meat quality that also influences consumer demand, and is therefore very important for the meat industry. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) contribute in large part to the flavor of meat, and while increasing numbers of articles are published on this topic, reviews of these articles are very scarce. Therefore, our aim was to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific publications on VOCs in meat over the period 2000–2020. We selected 611 scientific sources from the Scopus database related to VOCs in meat (seafood excluded). The bibliometric information retrieved included journals, authors, countries, institutions, keywords, and citations. From this analysis, we drew up a list of the most important journals, authors, countries, and institutions, and the trends in VOC research on meat. We conducted a social network analysis (SNA) to identify the collaborations among the many authors and countries, and a keyword analysis to generate a network map of the authors’ keywords. We also determined which meat species were most frequently chosen as research subjects, traced the evolution of the various methods/instruments used, and explored the research tendencies. Finally, we point out the need for further research in defining meat quality, improving meat flavor, identifying adulterants, and certifying the authenticity of meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods - Impact on Consumer Acceptance)
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