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Exploring the OMICS Platforms in Food Analysis II

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 8839

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CQM - Centro de Química da Madeira, Faculty of Exact Sciences and Engineering, University of Madeira, Funchal, Portugal
Interests: food chemistry; food composition; food bioactive; foodomics; fgeographical markers; food markers; food authenticity; fraceability; food contaminants; microextraction techniques; instrumental techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CQM—Centro de Química da Madeira, Universidade da Madeira, Campus da Penteada, Funchal, Portugal
Interests: food chemistry; molecular markers; natural products; food bioactive components; analytical chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CQM – Centro de Químcia da Madeira, Universidade da Madeira, 9000 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: food composition in bioactive compounds; food quality and degradation; markers for food origin and authenticity; microextraction; chromatographic analysis; foodomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The first edition of the Special Issue on “Exploring the OMICS Platforms in Food Analysis” was very rewarding, comprising fourteen papers. Thus, due to the great success of this first edition, we are pleased to inform you that Molecules will be launching a second edition of the Special Issue.

Since antiquity, scientists have been concerned with food and nutrition issues, the most significant discoveries coming from the late 1700s. Prominent scientists, including Antoine Lavoisier, Gay-Lussac, and Jacob Berzelius, studied foods intensively and made discoveries of fundamental importance to food chemistry. Impressive developments in different fields changed the food analysis paradigm, which has moved from classical methodologies to advanced technologies that have been well established.

Currently, research in food science and nutrition is boosted thanks to the great potential offered by foodomics in unraveling the vast complexities of food metabolomes at the genetic and molecular levels, through the employment of advanced OMICS tools, namely, metabolomics, lipidomics, proteomics, and genomics.

Assuming an increasing centrality on the systematic establishment of metabolomes, volatomes, lipidomes, proteomes, and genomes, OMICS technologies have now emerged as self-standing research fields relying on well-established and recognized analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry techniques (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS), in addition to modern spectroscopic approaches based on NMR (1H; 13C), IR and sensor technologies, to better characterize food matrices, identifying their components and defining nutritional properties. This comprehensive strategy, based on the integration of foodomic platforms, combined with high-resolution analytical approaches and data processing, can help us to elucidate some critical issues in food analysis related with food safety and food quality. In turn, this will progress our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms related with the health benefits of bioactive food components.

This Special Issue aims to attract contributions on all aspects of food science, food chemistry, and food analysis supported by different OMICS platforms. There is still the challenge to further explore food authentication and adulteration in addition to food safety and nutrition issues based on different high-throughput analytical methodologies.

Prof. Dr. José Sousa Câmara
Dr. Rosa Perestrelo
Dr. Jorge Pereira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1023 KiB  
Article
Shotgun Lipidomic Analysis for Differentiation of Niche Cold Pressed Oils
by Hanna Nikolaichuk, Kacper Przykaza, Anna Kozub, Magdalena Montowska, Grażyna Wójcicka, Jolanta Tomaszewska-Gras and Emilia Fornal
Molecules 2022, 27(6), 1848; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27061848 - 12 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2699
Abstract
The fast-growing food industry is bringing significant number of new products to the market. To protect consumers’ health and rights, it is crucial that food control laboratories are able to ensure reliable quality testing, including product authentication and detection of adulterations. In our [...] Read more.
The fast-growing food industry is bringing significant number of new products to the market. To protect consumers’ health and rights, it is crucial that food control laboratories are able to ensure reliable quality testing, including product authentication and detection of adulterations. In our study, we applied a fast and eco-friendly method based on shotgun-lipidomic mass spectrometry for the authentication of niche edible oils. Comprehensive lipid profiles of camelina (CA), flax (FL) and hemp (HP) seed oils were obtained. With the aid of principal component analysis (PCA), it was possible to detect and distinguish each of them based on their lipid profiles. Lipidomic markers characteristic ofthe oils were also identified, which can be used as targets and expedite development of new multiplexed testing methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring the OMICS Platforms in Food Analysis II)
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12 pages, 1761 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Health-Promoting Properties of Selected Fruits
by José A. Figueira, Priscilla Porto-Figueira, Cristina Berenguer, Jorge A. M. Pereira and José S. Câmara
Molecules 2021, 26(14), 4202; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26144202 - 10 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2558
Abstract
In this study, the health-promoting benefits of different fruits grown in Madeira Island, namely lemon (Citrus limon var. eureka), tangerine (Citrus reticulata var. setubalense), pitanga (Eugenia uniflora var. red), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. gordal) and [...] Read more.
In this study, the health-promoting benefits of different fruits grown in Madeira Island, namely lemon (Citrus limon var. eureka), tangerine (Citrus reticulata var. setubalense), pitanga (Eugenia uniflora var. red), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. gordal) and uva-da-serra, an endemic blueberry (Vaccinium padifolium Sm.), were investigated. The phenolic composition (total phenolics and total flavonoids content) and antioxidant capacity (assessed through ABTS and DPPH assays) were measured revealing a high phenolic potential for all fruits, except tomato, while uva-da-serra is particularly rich in flavonoids. In relation to the antioxidant capacity, the highest values were obtained for pitanga and uva-da-serra extracts. The bioactive potential was also assessed through the ability of the extracts to inhibit digestive enzymes linked to diabetes (α-amylase, α- and β-glucosidases) and hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme, ACE). The results obtained point to a very high bioactive potential with the selected samples exhibiting very important ACE anti-enzymatic capacities. A statistical analysis of the obtained data reveals a very strong correlation between ABTS and TPC, and a strong contribution of the fruit polyphenols for enzyme inhibition, and thus, presenting high antihypertensive and antidiabetic capacities. Overall, the results obtained clearly show a high bioactive potential of the selected fruits that should be further studied, in terms of specific phenolic composition. Moreover, these results strongly support the valorisation of pitanga seeds usually discarded as a waste, and uva-da-serra, an endemic and wild bush, as potential bioresources of bioactive compounds with impact in human diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring the OMICS Platforms in Food Analysis II)
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Review

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14 pages, 11378 KiB  
Review
Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics of Phytocannabinoids from Non-Cannabis Plant Origins
by Sarana Rose Sommano, Piyachat Sunanta, Noppol Leksawasdi, Kittisak Jantanasakulwong, Pornchai Rachtanapun, Phisit Seesuriyachan, Yuthana Phimolsiripol, Korawan Sringarm, Warintorn Ruksiriwanich, Pensak Jantrawut and Chuda Chittasupho
Molecules 2022, 27(10), 3301; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27103301 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2747
Abstract
Phytocannabinoids are isoprenylated resorcinyl polyketides produced mostly in glandular trichomes of Cannabis sativa L. These discoveries led to the identification of cannabinoid receptors, which modulate psychotropic and pharmacological reactions and are found primarily in the human central nervous system. As a result of [...] Read more.
Phytocannabinoids are isoprenylated resorcinyl polyketides produced mostly in glandular trichomes of Cannabis sativa L. These discoveries led to the identification of cannabinoid receptors, which modulate psychotropic and pharmacological reactions and are found primarily in the human central nervous system. As a result of the biogenetic process, aliphatic ketide phytocannabinoids are exclusively found in the cannabis species and have a limited natural distribution, whereas phenethyl-type phytocannabinoids are present in higher plants, liverworts, and fungi. The development of cannabinomics has uncovered evidence of new sources containing various phytocannabinoid derivatives. Phytocannabinoids have been isolated as artifacts from their carboxylated forms (pre-cannabinoids or acidic cannabinoids) from plant sources. In this review, the overview of the phytocannabinoid biosynthesis is presented. Different non-cannabis plant sources are described either from those belonging to the angiosperm species and bryophytes, together with their metabolomic structures. Lastly, we discuss the legal framework for the ingestion of these biological materials which currently receive the attention as a legal high. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring the OMICS Platforms in Food Analysis II)
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