Volatiles in Foods—Its Importance on Consumer Acceptance Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 4102

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Food Science, National Council of Research (ISA-CNR), Via Roma 64, 83100 Avellino, Italy
Interests: volatile organic compounds (VOCs); head space solid phase micro-extraction (HS SPME); gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); electronic nose; food quality; food safety; plant response to abiotic stress; packaging and/or storage conditions; innovative crops pre-treatment; modified and controlled atmosphere; logistic cold chain; innovative transport system; no-destructive systems for quality evaluation of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables; sensorial evaluation of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables; consumer acceptability based on the sensory properties of food
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Guest Editor
CQM - Centro de Química da Madeira, Faculty of Exact Sciences and Engineering, University of Madeira, Funchal, Portugal
Interests: food chemistry; food composition; food bioactive; foodomics; fgeographical markers; food markers; food authenticity; fraceability; food contaminants; microextraction techniques; instrumental techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a crucial role in the development of food aroma, which is the primary attribute for consumers’ acceptability. Scientific evidence suggests that odour is the main parameter that defines the quality of foods, since it acts as a signal of the presence of edible or inedible food even before the consumer sees the food itself. Different VOC patterns are obtained depending on cultivars, geographical origin, and different pre- and postharvest treatments or storage conditions, contributing to the discrimination of foodstuff in different sensory qualities. Recent studies have established that specific VOCs can enhance the flavour perception in plant-origin food, evaluating the overall acceptance by the statistical correlations among sensory attributes, assessed by a consumer panel and analytical data, including the VOCs profile.

In this context, this Special Issue of Foods invites you to send novel contributions concerning any aspect related to the monitoring of the VOCs profile, with the aim of contributing to the identification of possible signature metabolites (bio-markers) or patterns able to guarantee desirable aromatic characteristics for consumers, meet the expectations of the audience in a specifically targeted consumer market, and ensure the highest possible quality.

Dr. Rosaria Cozzolino
Prof. Dr. José Sousa Câmara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • volatile organic compounds
  • HS SPME/GC-MS
  • electronic nose
  • plant-origin food
  • consumer acceptability
  • fresh and fresh-cut vegetables
  • genotype
  • geographical origin
  • packaging
  • pre- and postharvest treatments
  • food quality/safety/authenticity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 3813 KiB  
Article
Volatile Profiling of Spirulina Food Supplements
by Aikaterina Paraskevopoulou, Triantafyllos Kaloudis, Anastasia Hiskia, Martin Steinhaus, Dimitra Dimotikali and Theodoros M. Triantis
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1257; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081257 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1237
Abstract
Spirulina, a cyanobacterium widely used as a food supplement due to its high nutrient value, contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It is crucial to assess the presence of VOCs in commercial spirulina products, as they could influence sensory quality, various processes, and technological [...] Read more.
Spirulina, a cyanobacterium widely used as a food supplement due to its high nutrient value, contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It is crucial to assess the presence of VOCs in commercial spirulina products, as they could influence sensory quality, various processes, and technological aspects. In this study, the volatile profiles of seventeen commercial spirulina food supplements were determined using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identification of volatile compounds was achieved using a workflow that combined data processing with software tools and reference databases, as well as retention indices (RI) and elution order data. A total of 128 VOCs were identified as belonging to chemical groups of alkanes (47.2%), ketones (25.7%), aldehydes (10.9%), alcohols (8.4%), furans (3.7%), alkenes (1.8%), esters (1.1%), pyrazines (0.8%), and other compounds (0.4%). Major volatiles among all samples were hydrocarbons, especially heptadecane and heptadec-8-ene, followed by ketones (i.e., 4-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-3-buten-2-one, β-ionone, 2,2,6-trimethylcyclohexan-1-one), aldehydes (i.e., hexanal), and the alcohol oct-1-en-3-ol. Several volatiles were found in spirulina dietary supplements for the first time, including 6,10-dimethylundeca-5,9-dien-2-one (geranylacetone), 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one, hept-2-enal, octanal, nonanal, oct-2-en-1-ol, heptan-1-ol, nonan-1-ol, tetradec-9-en-1-ol, 4,4-dimethylcyclohex-2-en-1-ol, 2,6-diethylpyrazine, and 1-(2,5-dimethylfuran-3-yl) ethanone. The methodology used for VOC analysis ensured high accuracy, reliability, and confidence in compound identification. Results reveal a wide variety of volatiles in commercial spirulina products, with numerous newly discovered compounds, prompting further research on sensory quality and production methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods—Its Importance on Consumer Acceptance Volume II)
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21 pages, 4287 KiB  
Article
The Physical and Structural Effects of 1-MCP on Four Different Apple Cultivars during Storage
by Valentina J. L. Ting, Pat Silcock, Franco Biasioli and Phil Bremer
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4050; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224050 - 7 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The impact of the ethylene inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), on four apple cultivars (Braeburn, Fuji, Jazz and Golden Delicious) over 150 days of storage at 2 °C was assessed. Proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QUAD-MS) was used to monitor changes in VOC composition, [...] Read more.
The impact of the ethylene inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), on four apple cultivars (Braeburn, Fuji, Jazz and Golden Delicious) over 150 days of storage at 2 °C was assessed. Proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QUAD-MS) was used to monitor changes in VOC composition, while texture analysis and X-ray microcomputer tomography (µ-CT) scanning were used to study microstructural changes. The application of 1-MCP on apples reduced VOC emissions, concurrently maintaining a firmer texture compared to the untreated apples at each time point. The µ-CT scanning revealed how changes in specific morphological characteristics such as anisotropy, connectivity and porosity, size and shape, as well as the interconnectivity of intracellular spaces (IS) influenced texture even when porosity was similar. Additionally, this study showed that the porosity and connectivity of IS were associated with VOC emission and increased simultaneously. This study highlights how the morphological parameters of an apple can help explain their ripening process during long-term storage and how their microstructure can influence the release of VOCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods—Its Importance on Consumer Acceptance Volume II)
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16 pages, 1637 KiB  
Article
Phenolic Content, Amino Acids, Volatile Compounds, Antioxidant Capacity, and Their Relationship in Wild Garlic (A. ursinum L.)
by Tvrtko Karlo Kovačević, Nikola Major, Marta Sivec, Dijana Horvat, Marina Krpan, Mirjana Hruškar, Dean Ban, Nina Išić and Smiljana Goreta Ban
Foods 2023, 12(11), 2110; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12112110 - 24 May 2023
Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Allium ursinum L. is a wild relative of garlic, and it is abundant in many antioxidant compounds. Sulfur compounds, primarily cysteine sulfoxides (CSOs), are converted through several reactions into various volatile molecules, which are considered the principal flavor compounds of Alliums. In addition [...] Read more.
Allium ursinum L. is a wild relative of garlic, and it is abundant in many antioxidant compounds. Sulfur compounds, primarily cysteine sulfoxides (CSOs), are converted through several reactions into various volatile molecules, which are considered the principal flavor compounds of Alliums. In addition to secondary metabolites, wild garlic is abundant in primary compounds, such as amino acids, which serve not only as building blocks for the health-promoting sulfur compounds but also as antioxidants. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between individual amino acid contents, the total phenolic content, and the profile of volatile compounds as well as their influence on the antioxidant capacity of both the leaves and bulbs of wild garlic populations in Croatia. Both univariate and multivariate methods were used to study the differences in the phytochemical compositions among the wild garlic plant organs and the link between individual compounds and antioxidant capacity. Both the plant organ and location, as well as their interaction, have a significant impact on the content of total phenolic content, amino acids, volatile organic compounds, and the antioxidant capacity of wild garlic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatiles in Foods—Its Importance on Consumer Acceptance Volume II)
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