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Selected Papers from 2021 Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand: Tūhono - Reconnecting

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 11634

Special Issue Editors

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
Interests: food insecurity; dietary assessment methods; food costs; public health nutrition; food poverty
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise manuscripts of papers presented as either oral or poster presentations at the 2021 Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand: Tūhono—Reconnecting (https://nutritionsociety.gecco.co.nz/2021-nsnz-annual-scientific-conference/).

The Special Issue will also include a manuscript written by the postgraduate student who received the “Nutrients Prize” for Best Student Oral Presentation.

Prof. Dr. Rachel Brown
Dr. Claire Smith
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Te Tiriti o Waitangi
  • women’s health
  • gut–brain axis
  • functional foods
  • sustainability and food sovereignty
  • food systems and access
  • healthy food environments for children

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 271 KiB  
Article
A Qualitative Study of Parental Perceptions of Baby Food Pouches: A Netnographic Analysis
Nutrients 2022, 14(15), 3248; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14153248 - 08 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1918
Abstract
Globally, a recent phenomenon in complementary feeding is the use of squeezable baby food pouches. However, some health agencies have raised concerns about their possible long-term health effects. The aim of this study was to describe parental perceptions of the use of baby [...] Read more.
Globally, a recent phenomenon in complementary feeding is the use of squeezable baby food pouches. However, some health agencies have raised concerns about their possible long-term health effects. The aim of this study was to describe parental perceptions of the use of baby food pouches during complementary feeding (i.e., the transition from an entirely milk-based diet to solid foods) using a netnographic analysis of discussions on publicly available forums. In this study, the community was parents of young children. Six parenting forums were identified through a Google search using defined selection criteria. Discussion threads relating to baby food pouches were collected and imported into NVivo12 for thematic analysis via inductive reasoning. Perceptions of baby food pouches fell within two broad categories—benefits and concerns. The most commonly reported themes related to benefits were: convenience, health, baby enjoys, variety, and cost; whereas the most common concerns reported were: health, cost, lack of dietary exposure, dependence, and waste. Many parents reported both benefits and concerns. Once research has determined the long-term effect of using pouches on infants’ health regarding eating habits, nutritional status, growth, and development, the findings of this study can inform educational strategies to either encourage or discourage their use. Full article
12 pages, 1054 KiB  
Article
Malnutrition Risk: Four Year Outcomes from the Health, Work and Retirement Study 2014 to 2018
Nutrients 2022, 14(11), 2205; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14112205 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1456
Abstract
This study aimed to determine four-year outcomes of community-living older adults identified at ‘nutrition risk’ in the 2014 Health, Work and Retirement Study. Nutrition risk was assessed using the validated Seniors in the Community: Risk Evaluation for Eating and Nutrition, (SCREENII-AB) by postal [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine four-year outcomes of community-living older adults identified at ‘nutrition risk’ in the 2014 Health, Work and Retirement Study. Nutrition risk was assessed using the validated Seniors in the Community: Risk Evaluation for Eating and Nutrition, (SCREENII-AB) by postal survey. Other measures included demographic, social and health characteristics. Physical and mental functioning and overall health-related quality of life were assessed using the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12v2). Depression was assessed using the verified shortened 10 item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D-10). Social provisions were determined with the 24-item Social Provisions Scale. Alcohol intake was determined by using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C). Among 471 adults aged 49–87 years, 33.9% were at nutrition risk (SCREEN II-AB score ≤ 38). The direct effects of nutrition risk showed that significant differences between at-risk and not-at-risk groups at baseline remained at follow up. Over time, physical health and alcohol use scores reduced. Mental health improved over time for not-at-risk and remained static for those at-risk. Time had non-significant interactions and small effects on all other indicators. Findings highlight the importance of nutrition screening in primary care as nutrition risk factors persist over time. Full article
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13 pages, 618 KiB  
Article
Sarcopenia Prevalence and Risk Factors among Residents in Aged Care
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1837; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091837 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2855
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sarcopenia and associated risk factors among older adults living in three residential aged care (RAC) facilities within Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 91 older adults (63% women, mean age ± SD; [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sarcopenia and associated risk factors among older adults living in three residential aged care (RAC) facilities within Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 91 older adults (63% women, mean age ± SD; 86.0 ± 8.3 years) were recruited. Using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria, sarcopenia was diagnosed from the assessment of: appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height2, using an InBody S10 body composition analyser and a SECA portable stadiometer or ulna length to estimate standing height; grip strength using a JAMAR handheld dynamometer; and physical performance with a 2.4-m gait speed test. Malnutrition risk was assessed using the Mini Nutrition Assessment–Short Form (MNA-SF). Most (83%) of residents were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, and 41% were sarcopenic. Multivariate regression analysis showed lower body mass index (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7, p = 0.003) and lower MNA-SF score (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.4, p = 0.047) were predictive of sarcopenia after controlling for age, level of care, depression, and number of medications. Findings highlight the need for regular malnutrition screening in RAC to prevent the development of sarcopenia, where low weight or unintentional weight loss should prompt sarcopenia screening and assessment. Full article
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11 pages, 6172 KiB  
Article
Adherence to Clinical Practice Guideline Recommendations in Women with Gestational Diabetes and Associations with Maternal and Infant Health—A Cohort Study
Nutrients 2022, 14(6), 1274; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14061274 - 17 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2485
Abstract
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is managed by dietary advice, but limited evidence exists about the impact of adherence on health. We assessed whether adherence to the New Zealand Ministry of Health dietary recommendations is associated with maternal and infant health in women with [...] Read more.
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is managed by dietary advice, but limited evidence exists about the impact of adherence on health. We assessed whether adherence to the New Zealand Ministry of Health dietary recommendations is associated with maternal and infant health in women with GDM. Data from 313 women with GDM were used. Adherence to food-related recommendations was scored from 0 (no adherence) to 10 (adhered to all recommendations) and analysed in tertile groups (high, moderate, low adherence). Adherence to visiting a dietitian and appropriate weight gain were assessed as yes or no. Chi-square, ANOVA, and odds ratios were used to compare groups. High dietary adherence compared to low adherence was associated with reduced oral hypoglycaemic and insulin use (OR = 0.55, CI = 0.30–1.00). Visiting a dietitian compared to not was associated with increased oral hypoglycaemic and insulin use (OR = 2.96, CI = 1.12–7.80), decreased odds of a large-for-gestational-age infant (OR = 0.32, CI = 0.14–0.73) and neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia (OR = 0.27, CI = 0.08–0.95). Greater than recommended compared with recommended weight gain was associated with increased oral hypoglycaemic and insulin use (OR = 2.51, CI = 1.26–5.01), while lower than recommended weight gain was associated with decreased postpartum haemorrhage (OR = 0.45, CI = 0.23–0.91) and increased breastfeeding (OR = 1.96, CI = 1.04–3.70). Adherence to dietary recommendations for women with GDM likely improves health outcomes. Full article
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13 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
A Sample of Female Adolescent Self-Identified Vegetarians in New Zealand Consume Less Protein and Saturated Fat, but More Fiber than Their Omnivorous Peers
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 711; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030711 - 08 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1910
Abstract
This study aimed to describe the intake and food sources of macronutrients in vegetarian and non-vegetarian adolescent females. Cross-sectional data was collected between February and September 2019. Adolescent females, aged 15 to 18 years old, were recruited throughout New Zealand. Intakes were assessed [...] Read more.
This study aimed to describe the intake and food sources of macronutrients in vegetarian and non-vegetarian adolescent females. Cross-sectional data was collected between February and September 2019. Adolescent females, aged 15 to 18 years old, were recruited throughout New Zealand. Intakes were assessed via two 24-h diet recalls, adjusted to represent usual intake using the multiple source method. Of the 254 participants, 38 self-identified as vegetarian. Vegetarians had similar carbohydrate and fat intakes compared to non-vegetarians; however, their protein intakes were 2.1% kJ lower (95% confidence interval (CI) −3.0 to −1.1%). Vegetarians also consumed 1.1% kJ less saturated fat (95% CI –2.1 to −0.1%), 1.3% kJ (95% CI 0.7 to 1.9) more polyunsaturated fat, and 5 g/day (95% CI 1.8 to 8.0) more fiber than non-vegetarians. When consumed, bread-based dishes and discretionary foods were the highest sources of energy, fat, and carbohydrate in both vegetarians and non-vegetarians. This suggests that some adolescents, including vegetarians, were obtaining high amounts of fat and carbohydrate from food groups associated with poorer dietary quality. We recommend further research to assess how the changing food environment is influencing vegetarian eating patterns and their associations with health outcomes in the wider population. Full article
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