nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Selected Papers from the 56th Annual Nutrition Society of New Zealand Conference

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 2719

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
Interests: food insecurity; dietary assessment methods; food costs; public health nutrition; food poverty
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise manuscripts of papers presented as either oral or poster presentations at the 2022 56th Annual Conference of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand. (https://www.nutritionsociety.gecco.co.nz/2022-nsnz-conference/)

The Special Issue will also include a manuscript written by the postgraduate student who received the “Nutrients Prize” for Best Student Oral Presentation.

Dr. Claire Smith
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sports nutrition
  • bio-active nutrients
  • women and children’s health
  • Te Tiriti o Waitangi
  • food systems
  • food sovereignty
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 312 KiB  
Article
Meat-Free Mondays in Hospital Cafés in Aotearoa, New Zealand
by Ella Ewens, Leanne Young and Sally Mackay
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4797; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224797 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1196
Abstract
Current human meat consumption levels contribute to environmental degradation and are a risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Globally, meat-reduction policy interventions are limited. Meat-Free Mondays (MFMs) is a global campaign to reduce meat consumption to improve planetary and human health. We conducted a [...] Read more.
Current human meat consumption levels contribute to environmental degradation and are a risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Globally, meat-reduction policy interventions are limited. Meat-Free Mondays (MFMs) is a global campaign to reduce meat consumption to improve planetary and human health. We conducted a mixed methods evaluation of MFMs at three District Health Boards (DHBs) (one not considering a MFM policy, one that had trialled MFMs and one implementing MFMs) to investigate attitudes towards MFMs and barriers and enablers to implementation. An online staff survey and eleven semi-structured interviews with food service managers, café managers and sustainability managers were conducted. Of the 194 survey participants, 51% were actively cutting back on meat, mainly for health, environmental concerns and enjoyment of plant-based dishes, and 59% were positive towards MFMs. Qualitative analysis using a general inductive approach identified four themes: (1) ‘Change and choice’ (impact on personal choice), (2) ‘Getting it right’ (product and price, food quality, health, customer retention and sales), (3) ‘Human and planetary health’ (hospitals as leaders in healthy, sustainable diets), (4) ‘Implementation success’ (communication and education). Recommendations for implementation of MFMs included seeking feedback from other DHBs, wide consultation with food service staff, cultural and dietitian food service support and providing evidence of the success of MFMs and alternatives to MFMs. Full article
21 pages, 822 KiB  
Article
Adherence to Infant Feeding Guidelines in the First Foods New Zealand Study
by Kimberley J. Brown, Kathryn L. Beck, Pamela von Hurst, Anne-Louise Heath, Rachael Taylor, Jillian Haszard, Lisa Daniels, Lisa Te Morenga, Jenny McArthur, Rebecca Paul, Emily Jones, Ioanna Katiforis, Madeleine Rowan, Maria Casale, Neve McLean, Alice Cox, Elizabeth Fleming, Bailey Bruckner, Rosario Jupiterwala, Andrea Wei and Cathryn Conlonadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Nutrients 2023, 15(21), 4650; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15214650 - 02 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1219
Abstract
Infant feeding guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations to support optimal infant health, growth, and development, and exploring adherence to guidelines is a useful way of assessing diet quality. The aim of this study was to determine adherence to the recently updated Ministry of Health [...] Read more.
Infant feeding guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations to support optimal infant health, growth, and development, and exploring adherence to guidelines is a useful way of assessing diet quality. The aim of this study was to determine adherence to the recently updated Ministry of Health “Healthy Eating Guidelines for New Zealand Babies and Toddlers (0–2 years old)”. Data were obtained from First Foods New Zealand, a multicentre observational study of 625 infants aged 7.0–10.0 months. Caregivers completed two 24-h diet recalls and a demographic and feeding questionnaire. Nearly all caregivers (97.9%) initiated breastfeeding, 37.8% exclusively breastfed to around six months of age, and 66.2% were currently breastfeeding (mean age 8.4 months). Most caregivers met recommendations for solid food introduction, including appropriate age (75.4%), iron-rich foods (88.3%), puréed textures (80.3%), and spoon-feeding (74.1%). Infants consumed vegetables (63.2%) and fruit (53.9%) more frequently than grain foods (49.5%), milk and milk products (38.6%), and meat and protein-rich foods (31.8%). Most caregivers avoided inappropriate beverages (93.9%) and adding salt (76.5%) and sugar (90.6%). Our findings indicated that while most infants met the recommendations for the introduction of appropriate solid foods, the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding could be improved, indicating that New Zealand families may need more support. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop