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New Trends in Inflammation Management

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 5390

Special Issue Editors

3B’s Research Group, I3Bs-Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Barco, Portugal
Interests: nanomedicine; inflammatory diseases; cancer; biomaterials; nanotechnology; materials engineering and chemistry; advanced therapies; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
I3B's-Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: biodegradable biomaterials; polymer science; natural origin biomaterials; surface biofunctionalization of biomaterials; innovative therapies for chronic inflammation; nanostructured biomaterials and composites; bone and cartilage tissue engineering; adult stem cells; advanced therapies; regenerative medicine; animal models for testing of biomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; biomaterials; biomimetics; biodegradable materials; 3D in vitro models; cancer modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acute inflammation is an efficient and essential temporarily restricted response for the maintenance of human health. However, failure to resolve acute inflammation leads to serious pathological conditions that jointly represent the leading cause of death worldwide today. Indeed, numerous challenging and devastating diseases are mainly caused by chronic inflammation or include chronic inflammation as a pathophysiologically important component.

Despite remarkable improvements in recent decades in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases, three main drawbacks remain unsolved: (i) severe adverse effects that often create a very high risk/benefit ratio; (ii) the underexplored heterogeneity of disease mechanisms and among patients; and (iii) limited efficacy as patients present reduced life expectancy that may be worsened due to different comorbidities. Indeed, the presence of one inflammatory disorder increases the probability of developing other diseases. Thus, therapies that could safely and effectively treat chronic inflammation, overcoming these limitations, must urgently be developed.

This Special Issue aims to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological processes in chronic inflammation and the latest achievements in the therapies for inflammatory diseases. This Special Issue will publish original research articles regarding the current understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in chronic inflammation as well as innovative, targeted and precision therapies. Review articles with a critical and detailed analysis of the published research and forecasting future avenues for the research in this field will be also valuable to this Special Issue.

Dr. Helena Ferreira
Dr. Nuno M. Neves
Prof. Dr. Rui L. Reis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic inflammation
  • nanomedicine
  • pro-inflammatory mediators
  • anti-inflammatory agents
  • immunomodulation
  • advanced therapies
  • precision therapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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25 pages, 3990 KiB  
Article
On the Bioactivity of Echinacea purpurea Extracts to Modulate the Production of Inflammatory Mediators
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(21), 13616; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232113616 - 06 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3010
Abstract
Inflammatory diseases are the focus of several clinical studies, due to limitations and serious side effects of available therapies. Plant-based drugs (e.g., salicylic acid, morphine) have become landmarks in the pharmaceutical field. Therefore, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of flowers, leaves, and roots [...] Read more.
Inflammatory diseases are the focus of several clinical studies, due to limitations and serious side effects of available therapies. Plant-based drugs (e.g., salicylic acid, morphine) have become landmarks in the pharmaceutical field. Therefore, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of flowers, leaves, and roots from Echinacea purpurea. Ethanolic (EE) and dichloromethanolic extracts (DE) were obtained using the Accelerated Solvent Extractor and aqueous extracts (AE) were prepared under stirring. Their chemical fingerprint was evaluated by liquid chromatography–high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The pro- and anti-inflammatory effects, as well as the reduction in intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), of the different extracts were evaluated using non-stimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Interestingly, AE were able to stimulate macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor -TNF-α, interleukin -IL-1β, and IL-6), and to generate ROS/RNS. Conversely, under an inflammatory scenario, all extracts reduced the amount of pro-inflammatory mediators. DE, alkylamides-enriched extracts, showed the strongest anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, E. purpurea extracts demonstrated generally a more robust anti-inflammatory activity than clinically used anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, diclofenac, salicylic acid, and celecoxib). Therefore, E. purpurea extracts may be used to develop new effective therapeutic formulations for disorders in which the immune system is either overactive or impaired. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Inflammation Management)
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Review

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32 pages, 3298 KiB  
Review
Host-Derived Cytotoxic Agents in Chronic Inflammation and Disease Progression
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 3016; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24033016 - 03 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2032
Abstract
At inflammatory sites, cytotoxic agents are released and generated from invading immune cells and damaged tissue cells. The further fate of the inflammation highly depends on the presence of antagonizing principles that are able to inactivate these host-derived cytotoxic agents. As long as [...] Read more.
At inflammatory sites, cytotoxic agents are released and generated from invading immune cells and damaged tissue cells. The further fate of the inflammation highly depends on the presence of antagonizing principles that are able to inactivate these host-derived cytotoxic agents. As long as the affected tissues are well equipped with ready-to-use protective mechanisms, no damage by cytotoxic agents occurs and resolution of inflammation is initiated. However, long-lasting and severe immune responses can be associated with the decline, exhaustion, or inactivation of selected antagonizing principles. Hence, cytotoxic agents are only partially inactivated and contribute to damage of yet-unperturbed cells. Consequently, a chronic inflammatory process results. In this vicious circle of permanent cell destruction, not only novel cytotoxic elements but also novel alarmins and antigens are liberated from affected cells. In severe cases, very low protection leads to organ failure, sepsis, and septic shock. In this review, the major classes of host-derived cytotoxic agents (reactive species, oxidized heme proteins and free heme, transition metal ions, serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases, and pro-inflammatory peptides), their corresponding protective principles, and resulting implications on the pathogenesis of diseases are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Inflammation Management)
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