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Engineering Biomaterials with Antimicrobial Properties

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2022) | Viewed by 4672

Special Issue Editors

3B’s Research Group, I3Bs - Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics of University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Avepark - Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, 4805-017 Barco, Guimarães, Portugal;
ICVS/3B’s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, 4805-017 Braga/Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: natural origin biomaterials; surface functionalization of biomaterials; drug delivery systems; tissue engineering; antimicrobial strategies; therapeutic eutectic systems
1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; biomaterials; biomimetics; biodegradable materials; 3D in vitro models; cancer modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a serious concern at a global scale that has dramatically increased over the past century partially due to the misuse of antibiotics. This is leading to a frightening scenario where, in the near future, the effectiveness of classical infection treatment approaches may be compromised, which poses a serious risk for human health. Antibiotic efficacy can be highly compromised by several resistance/adaptation mechanisms adopted by microorganisms, such as the formation of a biofilm layer. The root cause of a vast number of complicated healthcare-associated infections arises from the microbial colonization of biomedical devices. Hence, game-changing strategies and more in-depth research in engineering biomaterials with antimicrobials properties are required to tackle the rising occurrence of AMR. This issue focuses on biomaterials strategies struggling to limit AMR emergence by outlining promising strategies showcasing an increase in the infection-resistance of biomaterials. The main aim of this Special Issue is to publish original research articles that mitigate the occurrence and/or impact of implant-associated infections through different approaches, including the engineering of an interface between the implant and tissue that discourage the adhesion of microorganisms, the development of alternative antimicrobial agents and also the improvement of drug delivery systems. Review articles discussing state-of-the-art strategies employed in the fabrication of antimicrobial biomaterials and anticipating new avenues to minimize microbial infections on biomaterials will also be considered for inclusion in this Special Issue.

Dr. Joana M. Silva
Prof. Dr. Rui L. Reis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • anti-infective biomaterials
  • implant-associated infections
  • biomedical devices
  • microbial biofilms
  • surface functionalization
  • antimicrobial coatings
  • antifouling coatings
  • antimicrobial agents
  • surface topography
  • bioinspired strategies
  • natural compounds
  • antimicrobial resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 5760 KiB  
Article
Surface Functionalization of Ureteral Stents-Based Polyurethane: Engineering Antibacterial Coatings
Materials 2022, 15(5), 1676; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15051676 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2217
Abstract
Bacterial colonization of polyurethane (PU) ureteral stents usually leads to severe and challenging clinical complications. As such, there is an increasing demand for an effective response to this unmet medical challenge. In this study, we offer a strategy based on the functionalization of [...] Read more.
Bacterial colonization of polyurethane (PU) ureteral stents usually leads to severe and challenging clinical complications. As such, there is an increasing demand for an effective response to this unmet medical challenge. In this study, we offer a strategy based on the functionalization of PU stents with chitosan-fatty acid (CS-FA) derivatives to prevent bacterial colonization. Three different fatty acids (FAs), namely stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LinA), were successfully grafted onto chitosan (CS) polymeric chains. Afterwards, CS-FA derivatives-based solutions were coated on the surface of PU stents. The biological performance of the modified PU stents was evaluated against the L929 cell line, confirming negligible cytotoxicity of the developed coating formulations. The antibacterial potential of coated PU stents was also evaluated against several microorganisms. The obtained data indicate that the base material already presents an adequate performance against Staphylococcus aureus, which slightly improved with the coating. However, the performance of the PU stents against Gram-negative bacteria was markedly increased with the surface functionalization approach herein used. As a result, this study reveals the potential use of CS-FA derivatives for surface functionalization of ureteral PU stents and allows for conjecture on its successful application in other biomedical devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Biomaterials with Antimicrobial Properties)
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14 pages, 2325 KiB  
Article
DNA Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Coatings Are Antifouling and Promote Mammalian Cell Adhesion
Materials 2021, 14(16), 4596; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14164596 - 16 Aug 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1659
Abstract
The ability of bacteria to adhere to and form biofilms on implant surfaces is the primary cause of implant failure. Implant-associated infections are difficult to treat, as the biofilm mode of growth protects microorganisms from the host’s immune response and antibiotics. Therefore, modifications [...] Read more.
The ability of bacteria to adhere to and form biofilms on implant surfaces is the primary cause of implant failure. Implant-associated infections are difficult to treat, as the biofilm mode of growth protects microorganisms from the host’s immune response and antibiotics. Therefore, modifications of implant surfaces that can prevent or delay bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are highly desired. In addition, the attachment and spreading of bone cells are required for successful tissue integration in orthopedic and dental applications. We propose that polyanionic DNA with a negatively charged phosphate backbone could provide a dual function to repel bacterial adhesion and support host tissue cell attachment. To this end, we developed polyelectrolyte multilayer coatings using chitosan (CS) and DNA on biomaterial surfaces via a layer-by-layer technique. The assembly of these coatings was characterized. Further, we evaluated staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm growth on the coatings as well as cytotoxicity for osteoblast-like cells (SaOS-2 cells), and we correlated these to the layer structure. The CS-DNA multilayer coatings impaired the biofilm formation of Staphylococcus by ~90% on both PMMA and titanium surfaces. The presence of cationic CS as the top layer did not hinder the bacteria-repelling property of the DNA in the coating. The CS-DNA multilayer coatings demonstrated no cytotoxic effect on SaOS-2 cells. Thus, DNA polyelectrolyte multilayer coatings could reduce infection risk while promoting host tissue cell attachment on medical implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Biomaterials with Antimicrobial Properties)
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