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Advances in Novel 3D-Printed Biomaterials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2024 | Viewed by 845

Special Issue Editors

3B's Research Group‐Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University of Minho, Barco, 4805‐017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: hydrogels; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; bioprinting; angiogenesis; intervertebral disc; meniscus; personalized implants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; biomaterials; biomimetics; biodegradable materials; 3D in vitro models; cancer modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Notably, 3D-printing has enormous potential as a method for fabricating scaffolds for tissue engineering, biomedical devices, diagnostic and drug delivery platforms. The advantages of using 3D-printing for manufacturing scaffolds are multiple, including an incomparable architecture control at multiscale. This technology enables us to create scaffolds with precise and complex geometric configurations that can match the tissue defects, interconnected macro‐/microporosities, compositional gradients, and multiple cells (co-culture) and biological cues, which will dictate the final performance of the scaffolds in terms of structural, nutrient transport, and cell–matrix interaction properties.

One of the limitations for the application of 3D-printing in these fields is the number of printable biomaterials that are currently available. Besides the recent progress made in 3D‐printing methods and instrumentation, the rapid growth of 3D-printing and wide research interests has led to advances in the development of novel printable biomaterials and compositions. This Special Issue will focus on the most recent advances in the development of biomaterials and cell‐laden bio-inks for 3D-printing for application in the repair/regeneration of different tissues. We kindly invite you to submit a manuscript(s) for this Special Issue. Research papers, communications, and review articles are all welcome.

Dr. Joana Silva-Correia
Prof. Dr. Rui L. Reis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D-printing
  • additive manufacturing
  • biomaterials
  • bio-inks
  • customized implants
  • tissue engineering
  • regenerative medicine
  • drug delivery
  • diagnostic tools

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 19532 KiB  
Article
Process Development of a Generative Method for Partial and Controlled Integration of Active Substances into Open-Porous Matrix Structures
Materials 2023, 16(21), 6985; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16216985 - 31 Oct 2023
Viewed by 554
Abstract
A special generative manufacturing (AM) process was developed for the partial integration of active ingredients into open-porous matrix structures. A mixture of a silver-containing solution as an antibacterial material with an alginate hydrogel as a carrier system was produced as the active ingredient. [...] Read more.
A special generative manufacturing (AM) process was developed for the partial integration of active ingredients into open-porous matrix structures. A mixture of a silver-containing solution as an antibacterial material with an alginate hydrogel as a carrier system was produced as the active ingredient. The AM process developed was used to introduce the active ingredient solution into an open-porous niobium containing a β-titanium matrix structure, thus creating a reproducible active ingredient delivery system. The matrix structure had already been produced in a separate AM process by means of selective laser melting (SLM). The main advantage of this process is the ability to control porosity with high precision. To determine optimal surface conditions for the integration of active ingredients into the matrix structure, different surface conditions of the titanium substrate were tested for their impact on wetting behaviour of a silver-containing hydrogel solution. The solution-substrate contact angle was measured and evaluated to determine the most favourable surface condition. To develop the generative manufacturing process, an FDM printer underwent modifications that permitted partial application of the drug solution to the structure in accordance with the bioprinting principle. The modified process enabled flexible control and programming of both the position and volume of the applied drug. Furthermore, the process was able to fill up to 95% of the titanium matrix body pore volume used. The customised application of drug carriers onto implants as a drug delivery system can be achieved via the developed process, providing an alternative to established methods like dip coating that lack this capability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Novel 3D-Printed Biomaterials)
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