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Biopolymer-Based Materials for Biomedical Engineering (Second Volume)

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2024) | Viewed by 5408

Special Issue Editors

1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: nanobiomaterials; nanomedicine; theranostics; tissue engineering; bio 3D printing; 3D in vitro tissue models of disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; biomaterials; biomimetics; biodegradable materials; 3D in vitro models; cancer modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) is progressively less limited to the use of simple biomaterials capable of integrating the host tissue to promote the healing and regenerative process while it degrades. The convergence of regenerative medicine with other emerging fields such as nanotechnology, cell and molecular therapy, and precision medicine, can allow us to envision the development of innovative patient-specific approaches with new insights to reverse engineering, imaging acquisition, and scaffold design and biofabrication. Innovative solutions combining natural and/or synthetic biopolymers and emerging engineering strategies seem to be attractive and closer to precisely emulating the biological and mechanical diversity of in vivo tissues. Nanobiomaterials incorporating nanoparticles, peptides, and multimodal nanoprobes are being proposed for targeting specific cells and intracellular drug /gene delivery using live imaging. Aiming to explore these concepts, this Special Issue will focus on the biopolymer-based materials currently used for biomedical applications in TERM, the emerging scaffolding strategies and manufacturing techniques, as well as nanotools for biopolymer functionalization, material–cell interactions, and its biological performance assessment.

We kindly invite you to submit a manuscript(s) for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Submissions can cover the following topics (but are not limited to them):

  • Natural-based polymers for biomedical applications;
  • Nanobiomaterials for controlled and targeted drug/gene delivery;
  • Hydrogels for drug and cell delivery and imaging;
  • Polysaccharides and proteins for TERM;
  • Functionalization of biopolymers;
  • Synthetic polymers for TERM;
  • Biopolymers for TE scaffolding;
  • Processing of biopolymers;
  • Bioinks for Bio 3d printing;
  • Biopolymer–cell interactions and in vivo biological performance assessment.

Prof. Dr. Joaquim Miguel Oliveira
Prof. Dr. Rui L. Reis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biopolymers
  • tissue engineering
  • regenerative medicine
  • nanotechnology
  • precision medicine
  • reverse engineering
  • imaging
  • nanobiomaterials
  • drug delivery
  • scaffolding strategies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 2641 KiB  
Article
Travelling through the Natural Hierarchies of Type I Collagen with X-rays: From Tendons of Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Pigs
Materials 2023, 16(13), 4753; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16134753 - 30 Jun 2023
Viewed by 611
Abstract
Type I collagen physiological scaffold for tissue regeneration is considered one of the widely used biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical applications. It is hierarchically organized: five laterally staggered molecules are packed within fibrils, arranged into fascicles and bundles. The structural organization is [...] Read more.
Type I collagen physiological scaffold for tissue regeneration is considered one of the widely used biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical applications. It is hierarchically organized: five laterally staggered molecules are packed within fibrils, arranged into fascicles and bundles. The structural organization is correlated to the direction and intensity of the forces which can be loaded onto the tissue. For a tissue-specific regeneration, the required macro- and microstructure of a suitable biomaterial has been largely investigated. Conversely, the function of multiscale structural integrity has been much less explored but is crucial for scaffold design and application. In this work, collagen was extracted from different animal sources with protocols that alter its structure. Collagen of tendon shreds excised from cattle, horse, sheep and pig was structurally investigated by wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques, at both molecular and supramolecular scales, and thermo-mechanically with thermal and load-bearing tests. Tendons were selected because of their resistance to chemical degradation and mechanical stresses. The multiscale structural integrity of tendons’ collagen was studied in relation to the animal source, anatomic location and source for collagen extraction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopolymer-Based Materials for Biomedical Engineering (Second Volume))
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17 pages, 3522 KiB  
Article
Repairing Annulus Fibrosus Fissures Using Methacrylated Gellan Gum Combined with Novel Silk
Materials 2023, 16(8), 3173; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16083173 - 18 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1152
Abstract
Intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation often causes severe pain and is frequently associated with the degeneration of the IVD. As the IVD degenerates, more fissures with increasing size appear within the outer region of the IVD, the annulus fibrosus (AF), favoring the initiation and [...] Read more.
Intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation often causes severe pain and is frequently associated with the degeneration of the IVD. As the IVD degenerates, more fissures with increasing size appear within the outer region of the IVD, the annulus fibrosus (AF), favoring the initiation and progression of IVD herniation. For this reason, we propose an AF repair approach based on methacrylated gellan gum (GG-MA) and silk fibroin. Therefore, coccygeal bovine IVDs were injured using a biopsy puncher (⌀ 2 mm) and then repaired with 2% GG-MA as a filler material and sealed with an embroidered silk yarn fabric. Then, the IVDs were cultured for 14 days either without any load, static loading, or complex dynamic loading. After 14 days of culture, no significant differences were found between the damaged and repaired IVDs, except for a significant decrease in the IVDs’ relative height under dynamic loading. Based on our findings combined with the current literature that focuses on ex vivo AF repair approaches, we conclude that it is likely that the repair approach did not fail but rather insufficient harm was done to the IVD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopolymer-Based Materials for Biomedical Engineering (Second Volume))
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Review

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31 pages, 2712 KiB  
Review
Hydrogel-Forming Microneedles with Applications in Oral Diseases Management
Materials 2023, 16(13), 4805; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16134805 - 03 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2807
Abstract
Controlled drug delivery in the oral cavity poses challenges such as bacterial contamination, saliva dilution, and inactivation by salivary enzymes upon ingestion. Microneedles offer a location-specific, minimally invasive, and retentive approach. Hydrogel-forming microneedles (HFMs) have emerged for dental diagnostics and therapeutics. HFMs penetrate [...] Read more.
Controlled drug delivery in the oral cavity poses challenges such as bacterial contamination, saliva dilution, and inactivation by salivary enzymes upon ingestion. Microneedles offer a location-specific, minimally invasive, and retentive approach. Hydrogel-forming microneedles (HFMs) have emerged for dental diagnostics and therapeutics. HFMs penetrate the stratum corneum, undergo swelling upon contact, secure attachment, and enable sustained transdermal or transmucosal drug delivery. Commonly employed polymers such as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone are crosslinked with tartaric acid or its derivatives while incorporating therapeutic agents. Microneedle patches provide suture-free and painless drug delivery to keratinized or non-keratinized mucosa, facilitating site-specific treatment and patient compliance. This review comprehensively discusses HFMs’ applications in dentistry such as local anesthesia, oral ulcer management, periodontal treatment, etc., encompassing animal experiments, clinical trials, and their fundamental impact and limitations, for example, restricted drug carrying capacity and, until now, a low number of dental clinical trial reports. The review explores the advantages and future perspectives of HFMs for oral drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopolymer-Based Materials for Biomedical Engineering (Second Volume))
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