Advanced Research in Organs-on-a-Chip and Cancer

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Methods and Technologies Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2023) | Viewed by 1649

Special Issue Editors

Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona University and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Madrid, Spain
Interests: surface functionalization; engineering cell–material interface; biosensors and lab-on-a-chip; microfluidics; 3D bi-oprinting and 3D cell culture; organ-on-a-chip engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; biomaterials; biomimetics; biodegradable materials; 3D in vitro models; cancer modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. 3B's Research Group, I3Bs – Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Ave-Park, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, 4805-017 Barco, Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: biophysics; microfluidics; organ-on-a-chip; cancer; 3D in vitro models; bioengineering; tissue engineering; nano-technology; biomechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The lack of controllable preclinical models able to faithfully recapitulate the human cancer microenvironment impedes the development of novel therapies and limits our understanding of tumor etiology. Combining compartmentalized microfabricated platforms with advanced tissue engineering methods offers great potential for building biomimetic microfluidic models of human tissues and organs. These so-called ´organs-on-a-chip´ models have a unique capacity to, in vitro, recreate the biological complexity, mechanochemical cues, and fluid dynamics of native habitats of human cells and tissues, permitting the recapitulation of in vivo phenomena not achievable with traditional preclinical methods. Further, the inclusion of more complex 3D cellular structures, such as tumor organoids, and (bio)chemical signaling can recreate the interaction between cancer and its surrounding microenvironment in a more physiologically relevant manner, and, therefore, provide important clues to tumor etiology and progression.

Organ-on-a-chip technology has already provided key insights into organ and tissue pathophysiology and valuable information on drug efficacy, attracting significant attention from the industry and clinics as a result. In this regard, the use of organ-on-a-chip technology in oncology is a very promising method for the attainment of a better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of tumorigenesis, drug mechanisms of action or for evaluating the efficacy of therapies before testing them on patients. Currently, important efforts have been focused on adapting organ-on-a-chip platforms to the needs of targeted end-users, particularly clinicians. Despite the undeniable ability to reproduce the in vivo physiology and predict the response of therapeutics, this technology is still too complex and, in general, does not fulfill the strict requirements and functionality required by the clinical sector. For this reason, novel cutting-edge technologies have been applied to boost the clinical translation of organ-on-a-chip in oncology. Particularly, the use of standardized designs, the incorporation of analytical biosensors to detect and monitor predictive biomarkers, the compatibility with advanced imaging and conventional analytical techniques, the application of artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms for the processing of gathered data, the integration of human-based and personalized (bio)materials or the possibility to purchase already pre-established tissue models-on-a-chip are expected to boost the clinical acceptance of this technology, particularly when combined with an improvement on their automation and high-throughput properties.

Overall, organ-on-a-chip technology has countless possibilities in academic, industrial and clinical cancer research. We are confident in its ability to continue to offer exciting novel developments and discoveries in upcoming years. We invite all those working in this revolutionary field to contribute to this Special Issue with original research articles, reviews, commentaries and perspectives in all relevant areas of research.

Prof. Dr. Josep Samitier
Prof. Dr. Rui L. Reis
Dr. David Caballero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tumor in vitro modelling
  • microfluidics
  • organ-on-a-chip
  • tumor-on-a-chip
  • 3D cell culture
  • drug screening and dis-covery
  • biosensors
  • nanotechnology
  • clinical applications
  • personalized medicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

28 pages, 2842 KiB  
Review
Cell Culture Model Evolution and Its Impact on Improving Therapy Efficiency in Lung Cancer
Cancers 2023, 15(20), 4996; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15204996 - 15 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1224
Abstract
Optimizing cell culture conditions is essential to ensure experimental reproducibility. To improve the accuracy of preclinical predictions about the response of tumor cells to different classes of drugs, researchers have used 2D or 3D cell cultures in vitro to mimic the cellular processes [...] Read more.
Optimizing cell culture conditions is essential to ensure experimental reproducibility. To improve the accuracy of preclinical predictions about the response of tumor cells to different classes of drugs, researchers have used 2D or 3D cell cultures in vitro to mimic the cellular processes occurring in vivo. While 2D cell culture provides valuable information on how therapeutic agents act on tumor cells, it cannot quantify how the tumor microenvironment influences the response to therapy. This review presents the necessary strategies for transitioning from 2D to 3D cell cultures, which have facilitated the rapid evolution of bioengineering techniques, leading to the development of microfluidic technology, including organ-on-chip and tumor-on-chip devices. Additionally, the study aims to highlight the impact of the advent of 3D bioprinting and microfluidic technology and their implications for improving cancer treatment and approaching personalized therapy, especially for lung cancer. Furthermore, implementing microfluidic technology in cancer studies can generate a series of challenges and future perspectives that lead to the discovery of new predictive markers or targets for antitumor treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research in Organs-on-a-Chip and Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop