Food Proteins: Processing, Interactions, Functionality and Bioavailability

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 5556

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: dairy; meat; seafood; novel proteins; protein nutrition; protein digestion; bioavailability; personalized nutrition; food synergy

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Co-Guest Editor
School of Food and Advanced Technology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Interests: proteins; polysaccharides; meat; in vitro digestion; structure–digestion relationship
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: relationships between the food structure; digestion and release of nutrients and bioactive compounds; encapsulation of active food ingredients; strategies to develop future food systems with better nutrition value
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Protein is an essential part of our diet. As the world population increases and pressure on the environment from farming grows, there is a need for more efficient and greener methods of production and processing; there is also a need for growth in the production of alternative proteins that can supplement or partially replace the existing protein supply.

This Special Issue will discuss progress in these areas, and the potential impact of novel processes and proteins on the nutritional and health properties of these proteins.

Dr. Mike Boland
Dr. Lovedeep Kaur
Dr. Alejandra Acevedo-Fani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dairy
  • meat
  • seafood
  • novel proteins
  • protein nutrition
  • protein digestion
  • bioavailability
  • allergenic and other reactions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 5455 KiB  
Article
Effect of Molecular Weight on the Structural and Emulsifying Characteristics of Bovine Bone Protein Hydrolysate
by Yaodi Zhu, Niancheng Hong, Lijun Zhao, Shengnan Liu, Jie Zhang, Miaoyun Li, Yangyang Ma, Dong Liang and Gaiming Zhao
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4515; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244515 - 18 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The emulsifying capacity of bovine bone protein extracted using high-pressure hot water (HBBP) has been determined to be good. Nevertheless, given that HBBP is a blend of peptides with a broad range of molecular weights, the distinction in emulsifying capacity between polypeptide components [...] Read more.
The emulsifying capacity of bovine bone protein extracted using high-pressure hot water (HBBP) has been determined to be good. Nevertheless, given that HBBP is a blend of peptides with a broad range of molecular weights, the distinction in emulsifying capacity between polypeptide components with high and low molecular weights is unclear. Therefore, in this study, HBBP was separated into three molecular weight components of 10–30 kDa (HBBP 1), 5–10 kDa (HBBP 2), and <5 kDa (HBBP 3) via ultrafiltration, and the differences in their structures and emulsifying properties were investigated. The polypeptide with the highest molecular weight displayed the lowest endogenous fluorescence intensity, the least solubility in an aqueous solution, and the highest surface hydrophobicity index. Analysis using laser confocal Raman spectroscopy showed that with an increase in polypeptide molecular weight, the α-helix and β-sheet contents in the secondary structure of the polypeptide molecule increased significantly. Particle size, rheological characteristics, and laser confocal microscopy were used to characterize the emulsion made from peptides of various molecular weights. High-molecular-weight peptides were able to provide a more robust spatial repulsion and thicker interfacial coating in the emulsion, which would make the emulsion more stable. The above results showed that the high-molecular-weight polypeptide in HBBP effectively improved the emulsion stability when forming an emulsion. This study increased the rate at which bovine bone was utilized and provided a theoretical foundation for the use of bovine bone protein as an emulsifier in the food sector. Full article
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15 pages, 13962 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Thermal-Induced Polymerized Goat Milk Whey Protein
by Mu Tian, Xiaomeng Sun, Jianjun Cheng and Mingruo Guo
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3626; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193626 - 29 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Goat milk whey protein products are a hard-to-source commodity. Whey protein concentrate was directly prepared from fresh goat milk. The effects of the heating temperature (69–78 °C), time (15–30 min), and pH (7.5–7.9) on the physicochemical and functional properties of the goat milk [...] Read more.
Goat milk whey protein products are a hard-to-source commodity. Whey protein concentrate was directly prepared from fresh goat milk. The effects of the heating temperature (69–78 °C), time (15–30 min), and pH (7.5–7.9) on the physicochemical and functional properties of the goat milk whey protein were investigated. The results showed that the particle size of the samples significantly increased (p < 0.05) after heat treatment. The zeta potential of polymerized goat milk whey protein (PGWP) was lower than that of native goat milk whey protein. The content of the free sulfhydryl groups of PGWP decreased with increasing heating temperature and time, while an increase in surface hydrophobicity and apparent viscosity of PGWP were observed after heat treatment. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis indicated that heat treatment and pH had considerable impacts on the secondary structure of goat milk whey protein. Transmission electron microscope images revealed that heat induced the formation of a large and uniform protein network. Additionally, the changes in the physicochemical and structural properties contributed to the improvement of the emulsifying and foaming properties of goat milk whey protein after heat treatment. The results may provide a theoretical basis for the applications of polymerized goat milk whey protein in related products. Full article
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Review

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31 pages, 1659 KiB  
Review
Electrical Fields in the Processing of Protein-Based Foods
by Ricardo N. Pereira, Rui Rodrigues, Zita Avelar, Ana Catarina Leite, Rita Leal, Ricardo S. Pereira and António Vicente
Foods 2024, 13(4), 577; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040577 - 14 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Electric field-based technologies offer interesting perspectives which include controlled heat dissipation (via the ohmic heating effect) and the influence of electrical variables (e.g., electroporation). These factors collectively provide an opportunity to modify the functional and technological properties of numerous food proteins, including ones [...] Read more.
Electric field-based technologies offer interesting perspectives which include controlled heat dissipation (via the ohmic heating effect) and the influence of electrical variables (e.g., electroporation). These factors collectively provide an opportunity to modify the functional and technological properties of numerous food proteins, including ones from emergent plant- and microbial-based sources. Currently, numerous scientific studies are underway, contributing to the emerging body of knowledge about the effects on protein properties. In this review, “Electric Field Processing” acknowledges the broader range of technologies that fall under the umbrella of using the direct passage of electrical current in food material, giving particular focus to the ones that are industrially implemented. The structural and biological effects of electric field processing (thermal and non-thermal) on protein fractions from various sources will be addressed. For a more comprehensive contextualization of the significance of these effects, both conventional and alternative protein sources, along with their respective ingredients, will be introduced initially. Full article
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24 pages, 7592 KiB  
Review
Effect of Process Variables and Ingredients on Controlled Protein Network Creation in High-Moisture Plant-Based Meat Alternatives
by Animesh Singh Sengar, Michael Beyrer, Ciara McDonagh, Uma Tiwari and Shivani Pathania
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3830; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203830 - 19 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
The market has observed a rapid increase in the demand for plant-based foods as an alternative to animal meat products. Technologies such as high-moisture extrusion (HME) have the potential to develop anisotropic structures using alternative protein ingredients. This article discusses the different possible [...] Read more.
The market has observed a rapid increase in the demand for plant-based foods as an alternative to animal meat products. Technologies such as high-moisture extrusion (HME) have the potential to develop anisotropic structures using alternative protein ingredients. This article discusses the different possible mechanisms responsible for structure formation and the effect of extrusion process parameters and outlines the recent advances in the long cooling dies (LCDs) used for meat alternative development. The role of different protein ingredients and the impact of combining them with other biopolymers were also evaluated. The underlying mechanism behind anisotropic structure formation during HME is a synergistic effect, with substantial dependence on the source of ingredients and their processing background. Formulation including proteins derived from plants, insects, animals, and microalgae with other biopolymers could pave the way to develop structured meat alternatives and fill nutritional interstices. Dynamic or rotating annular gap cooling dies operating at freely controllable shear and static annular gap dies are recent developments and assist to produce layered or fibrous structures. The complex chemical sites created during the HME of plant protein favour flavour and colour retention. This paper summarises the recent information published in the scientific literature and patents, which could further help researchers to fill the present knowledge gaps. Full article
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