Functional BeveragesCurrent Concepts Through to Implementation into the Food Chain

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 August 2022) | Viewed by 48157

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food & Ecosystem Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Interests: probiotics; prebiotics; dairy products and food quality and safety
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Guest Editor
1. Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra 2617, ACT, Australia
2. Functional Foods and Nutrition Research (FFNR) Laboratory, University of Canberra, Ngunnawal Land 2617, Australia
3. University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UCRISE), Canberra 2617, ACT, Australia
4. Discipline of Nutrition-Dietetics, Harokopio University, 17671 Athens, Greece
Interests: green tea; plant polyphenols; catechins; EGCG; bioactives, nutrition; the effects of resveratrol supplementation on obesity in humans; plant bioactives; nutraceuticals
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Guest Editor
Aston Medical School, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK
Interests: cocoa; low alcohol beers; diabetes; cardiovascular risk; obesity; evidence-based medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of functional beverages is a rapidly growing sector of the food industry globally. Functional beverages are developed and designed to provide consumers with additional potential health benefits that extend beyond their nutritional composition and possess appealing sensory characteristics. Processing technologies of functional beverages can be traditional/conventional or advanced and the new technological applications are continuously being implemented. This also adds to the wide array of food ingredients that are emerging on the food market and allows their use in the manufacturing of functional beverages, offering endless formulation opportunities.

This Special Issue is expected to provide up-to-date information on all aspects of research innovations and high-quality reviews on processing, storage and packaging technologies, physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory aspects, functional properties, quality and safety, nutrition and health benefits of functional beverages. This Special Issue is also open for submission of concept papers, reviews and original research manuscripts.

Dr. Senaka Ranadheera
Prof. Dr. Nenad Naumovski
Dr. Duane D. Mellor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1391 KiB  
Article
Possible Utilization of Two-Phase Olive Pomace (TPOP) to Formulate Potential Functional Beverages: A Preliminary Study
by Antonella De Leonardis, Ayesha Iftikhar and Vincenzo Macciola
Beverages 2022, 8(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8030057 - 19 Sep 2022
Viewed by 2041
Abstract
The demand for functional beverages is expanding over the world. In this work, a rapid, easy and low-cost procedure was followed to prepare a functional beverage (FB) by directly using two-phase olive pomace (TPOP). Liquid ingredients (water and 6% citric acid), extraction systems [...] Read more.
The demand for functional beverages is expanding over the world. In this work, a rapid, easy and low-cost procedure was followed to prepare a functional beverage (FB) by directly using two-phase olive pomace (TPOP). Liquid ingredients (water and 6% citric acid), extraction systems (heat and ultrasonic treatment), treatment time (30, 60, 90 min) and drying techniques (freeze and air-dried) were studied. Experimented TPOP had a total phenol content of 7.5 mg/g CAE (caffeic acid equivalent), composed majorly of o-diphenols. Air drying of TPOP caused a 50% depletion of total phenols compared to freeze drying. Conversely, no substantial differences were found in the FB, neither for liquid ingredients nor treatment/time adopted. Both 6% citric acid and water were revealed to be profitable liquid ingredients. A 30-min heating treatment was enough to produce a satisfactory beverage, whereas ultrasound treatment caused a loss of total phenols, especially in the water FB. All FBs appeared just limpid after a simple filtration; the citric acid beverage showed reddish color, while water ones were brownish. Finally, the prepared FBs had an average total phenol of about 600 mg/L CAE (by using 300 g/L fresh pomace), with hydroxytyrosol and related compounds being well represented, which confirmed their potential functionality. Full article
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Review

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17 pages, 1625 KiB  
Review
Functional Beverages in the 21st Century
by Mateusz Sugajski, Magdalena Buszewska-Forajta and Bogusław Buszewski
Beverages 2023, 9(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9010027 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3983
Abstract
Underlying the dawn of humanity was primarily the search for food and access to drinking water. Over the course of civilization, there has been a significant increase in drinking water quality. By the average of the nutritional standards, the daily water demand is [...] Read more.
Underlying the dawn of humanity was primarily the search for food and access to drinking water. Over the course of civilization, there has been a significant increase in drinking water quality. By the average of the nutritional standards, the daily water demand is 2.5 L (also including liquid products such as tea, coffee, or soup). However, it is worth noticing that the need is strictly individual for each person and depends on two major factors, namely, epidemiological (sex, age state of health, lifestyle, and diet) and environmental (humidity and air temperature). Currently, our diet is more and more often enriched with isotonic drinks, functional drinks, or drinks bearing the hallmarks of health-promoting products. As a result, manufacturing companies compete to present more interesting beverages with complex compositions. This article will discuss both the composition of functional beverages and their impact on health. Full article
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19 pages, 675 KiB  
Review
The Effects of Consuming Amino Acids L-Arginine, L-Citrulline (and Their Combination) as a Beverage or Powder, on Athletic and Physical Performance: A Systematic Review
by Siphamandla Nyawose, Rowena Naidoo, Nenad Naumovski and Andrew J. McKune
Beverages 2022, 8(3), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8030048 - 17 Aug 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 31041
Abstract
Consumption of amino acids L-arginine (L-Arg) and L-citrulline (L-Cit) are purported to increase nitric oxide (NO) production and improve physical performance. Clinical trials have shown relatively more favorable outcomes than not after supplementing with L-Cit and combined L-Arg and L-Cit. However, in most [...] Read more.
Consumption of amino acids L-arginine (L-Arg) and L-citrulline (L-Cit) are purported to increase nitric oxide (NO) production and improve physical performance. Clinical trials have shown relatively more favorable outcomes than not after supplementing with L-Cit and combined L-Arg and L-Cit. However, in most studies, other active ingredients such as malate were included in the supplement. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of consuming standalone L-Arg, L-Cit, and their combination (in the form of powder or beverage) on blood NO level and physical performance markers. A systematic review was undertaken following PRISMA 2020 guidelines (PROSPERO: CRD42021287530). Four electronic databases (PubMed, Ebscohost, Science Direct, and Google scholar) were used. An acute dose of 0.075 g/kg of L-Arg or 6 g L-Arg had no significant increase in NO biomarkers and physical performance markers (p > 0.05). Consumption of 2.4 to 6 g/day of L-Cit over 7 to 16 days significantly increased NO level and physical performance markers (p < 0.05). Combined L-Arg and L-Cit supplementation significantly increased circulating NO, improved performance, and reduced feelings of exertion (p < 0.05). Standalone L-Cit and combined L-Arg with L-Cit consumed over several days effectively increases circulating NO and improves physical performance and feelings of exertion in recreationally active and well-trained athletes. Full article
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12 pages, 1198 KiB  
Review
Nutraceutical and Functional Properties of Camelids’ Milk
by Silvia Vincenzetti, Natalina Cammertoni, Roberta Rapaccetti, Giuseppe Santini, Yulia Klimanova, Jing-Jing Zhang and Paolo Polidori
Beverages 2022, 8(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8010012 - 17 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4945
Abstract
In most areas of the world, camelids are considered exotic animals, living only in zoological gardens. Additionally, considering the original lands where they were previously bred with specific economic and social aims, today it is possible to detect a reduction in their total [...] Read more.
In most areas of the world, camelids are considered exotic animals, living only in zoological gardens. Additionally, considering the original lands where they were previously bred with specific economic and social aims, today it is possible to detect a reduction in their total numbers. Typically bred as working animals for goods transportation in desert regions, and as a source of meat and milk, in recent years, camels have been dismissed due to the construction of new roads for motor vehicles, the migration of nomadic populations from deserts to urban zones, and the choice of some autochthonous bovine breeds as sources of meat and milk. The decline in camelids heads seems irreversible. Camels should be considered a valid source of food in marginal areas; the peculiar quality parameters of their milk, showing the proper characteristics for the use of this milk in human nutrition, can justify the choice for breeding them, rather than considering camels only as objects of amusement. Full article
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