Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 15321

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Centre for Textile Science and Technology, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: antimicrobial agents; regenerative cues; drug delivery; biomaterials; wound healing; medical textiles; polymer processing; nano- and microfiber scaffolding systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, fibers have seen increased applications in several areas of biomedicine, namely in wound dressings, bone tissue engineering, and drug-controlled release and delivery, among others. Its low toxicity, biodegradability, biocompatibility, natural abundance, and outstanding mechanical properties have made cellulose and its derivatives a potent material for use in drug delivery applications, wound dressing, and many other biomedical applications. Aside from cellulose, chitosan and its derivatives and many other naturally derived polymers have played a crucial role in the production of important drug delivery platforms for biomedical applications in the last few years.

Based on the potential application of the scaffold, the organization of fibers is a crucial element for the performance of the intended function, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. From electrospinning (or other spinning techniques, e.g., wet-spinning) to 3D printing scaffolding fiber-based systems, these techniques have contributed significantly to the optimization of devices and the improvement of the quality of life of many patients.

This Special Issue aims to collect advanced studies of fiber-based scaffolds in the drug delivery field. By submitting the latest and unique results of your research, you can share knowledge and data with readers and scientists working in this discipline. Any novel and smart fiber scaffolding systems using the techniques mentioned earlier or others are very welcome.

Dr. Helena P. Felgueiras
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • nano- and microfibers
  • spinning techniques
  • natural-origin carriers
  • trigger-based drug release
  • controlled liberation of drugs
  • antimicrobial cues
  • tissue regenerative properties

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 22883 KiB  
Article
Functionalization of Osteoplastic Material with Human Placental Growth Factor and Assessment of Biocompatibility of the Resulting Material In Vitro
by Diana Ya Aleynik, Andrey E. Bokov, Irina N. Charykova, Yulia P. Rubtsova, Daria D. Linkova, Ekaterina A. Farafontova and Marfa N. Egorikhina
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(1), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16010085 - 8 Jan 2024
Viewed by 856
Abstract
This article provides the results of a study of the interaction of placental growth factor with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) of various origins, as well as the possibility of generating osteoplastic material based on xenogeneic matrix functionalization with human placental growth factor (PLGF). [...] Read more.
This article provides the results of a study of the interaction of placental growth factor with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) of various origins, as well as the possibility of generating osteoplastic material based on xenogeneic matrix functionalization with human placental growth factor (PLGF). It is demonstrated that the greatest release of this factor from the functionalized material into the medium occurs during the first 3 h of contact with the model medium, but then the levels of the factor being released fall sharply, although release did continue throughout the 7 days of observation. The modified material was not cytotoxic, and its surface provided good cell adhesion. During 3 days of cultivation, the ASCs proliferated and migrated more actively on the surfaces of the modified material than on the surfaces of the control material. This study can serve as the basis for the development of original methods to functionalize such osteoplastic material by increasing PLGF immobilization by creating stronger bonds in order to regulate both factor dosage and the dynamics of the factor release into the environment. Further studies in experimental animals should facilitate assessment of the effectiveness of the functionalized materials. Such studies will be useful in the development of osteoplastic materials with new properties resulting from the inclusion of growth factors and in research on their biological activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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22 pages, 6854 KiB  
Article
Antibacterial Activity and Cytocompatibility of Electrospun PLGA Scaffolds Surface-Modified by Pulsed DC Magnetron Co-Sputtering of Copper and Titanium
by Arsalan D. Badaraev, Marat I. Lerner, Olga V. Bakina, Dmitrii V. Sidelev, Tuan-Hoang Tran, Maksim G. Krinitcyn, Anna B. Malashicheva, Elena G. Cherempey, Galina B. Slepchenko, Anna I. Kozelskaya, Sven Rutkowski and Sergei I. Tverdokhlebov
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(3), 939; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15030939 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1767
Abstract
Biocompatible poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds fabricated via electrospinning are having promising properties as implants for the regeneration of fast-growing tissues, which are able to degrade in the body. The hereby-presented research work investigates the surface modification of these scaffolds in order to improve antibacterial properties [...] Read more.
Biocompatible poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds fabricated via electrospinning are having promising properties as implants for the regeneration of fast-growing tissues, which are able to degrade in the body. The hereby-presented research work investigates the surface modification of these scaffolds in order to improve antibacterial properties of this type of scaffolds, as it can increase their application possibilities in medicine. Therefore, the scaffolds were surface-modified by means of pulsed direct current magnetron co-sputtering of copper and titanium targets in an inert atmosphere of argon. In order to obtain different amounts of copper and titanium in the resulting coatings, three different surface-modified scaffold samples were produced by changing the magnetron sputtering process parameters. The success of the antibacterial properties’ improvement was tested with the methicillin-resistant bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the resulting cell toxicity of the surface modification by copper and titanium was examined using mouse embryonic and human gingival fibroblasts. As a result, the scaffold samples surface-modified with the highest copper to titanium ratio show the best antibacterial properties and no toxicity against mouse fibroblasts, but have a toxic effect to human gingival fibroblasts. The scaffold samples with the lowest copper to titanium ratio display no antibacterial effect and toxicity. The optimal poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffold sample is surface-modified with a medium ratio of copper and titanium that has antibacterial properties and is non-toxic to both cell cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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23 pages, 8091 KiB  
Article
Fabrication, Optimization, and Characterization of Antibacterial Electrospun Shellac Fibers Loaded with Kaempferia parviflora Extract
by Wantanwa Krongrawa, Sontaya Limmatvapirat, Mont Kumpugdee Vollrath, Prasat Kittakoop, Supachai Saibua and Chutima Limmatvapirat
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(1), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15010123 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1906
Abstract
This study aimed to develop a Kaempferia parviflora (KP) extract based on electrospun shellac fibers capable of transporting methoxyflavones. This study used a Box–Behnken design to determine the optimal production parameters that influence the fiber diameter and bead-to-fiber ratio responses. The optimization step [...] Read more.
This study aimed to develop a Kaempferia parviflora (KP) extract based on electrospun shellac fibers capable of transporting methoxyflavones. This study used a Box–Behnken design to determine the optimal production parameters that influence the fiber diameter and bead-to-fiber ratio responses. The optimization step produced fibers with a small diameter (574 nm) and a lower bead-to-fiber ratio (0.48 beads per fiber) by combining 37.25% w/w shellac and 1.50% w/w KP extract with a solution feed rate of 0.8 mL/h and an electrical voltage of 18 kV. The KP extract was found to be dispersed throughout the electrospun shellac fibers during the characterization study. The results were highly correlated with the theoretical values, indicating that the regression models used to predict the response variables were adequate. A study of in vitro dissolution confirmed that KP extract-loaded electrospun shellac fibers could produce a sustained-release profile within 10 h. Additionally, KP-infused shellac fibers demonstrated antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. This KP loading method combined with shellac properties provided a new delivery system and could be used to explore novel biomedical materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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19 pages, 8323 KiB  
Article
Polycaprolactone (PCL)-Polylactic Acid (PLA)-Glycerol (Gly) Composites Incorporated with Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and Tea Tree Essential Oil (TTEO) for Tissue Engineering Applications
by Carlos David Grande-Tovar, Jorge Iván Castro, Carlos Humberto Valencia Llano, Diego López Tenorio, Marcela Saavedra, Paula A. Zapata and Manuel N. Chaur
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(1), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15010043 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2176
Abstract
The search for new biocompatible materials that can replace invasive materials in biomedical applications has increased due to the great demand derived from accidents and diseases such as cancer in various tissues. In this sense, four formulations based on polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactic [...] Read more.
The search for new biocompatible materials that can replace invasive materials in biomedical applications has increased due to the great demand derived from accidents and diseases such as cancer in various tissues. In this sense, four formulations based on polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) incorporated with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and tea tree essential oil (TTEO) were prepared. The sol-gel method was used for zinc oxide nanoparticle synthesis with an average size of 11 ± 2 nm and spherical morphology. On the other hand, Fourier Transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed characteristic functional groups for each composite component. The TTEO incorporation in the formulations was related to the increased intensity of the C-O-C band. The thermal properties of the materials show that the degradative properties of the ZnO-NPs decrease the thermal stability. The morphological study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the presence of TTEO and ZnO-NPs act synergistically, obtaining smooth surfaces, whereas membranes with the presence of ZnO-NPs or TTEO only show porous morphologies. Histological implantation of the membranes showed biocompatibility and biodegradability after 60 days of implantation. This degradation occurs through the fragmentation of the larger particles with the presence of connective tissue constituted by type III collagen fibers, blood vessels, and inflammatory cells, where the process of resorption of the implanted material continues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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Review

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38 pages, 3913 KiB  
Review
Nanofiber Scaffolds as Drug Delivery Systems Promoting Wound Healing
by Ziwei Jiang, Zijun Zheng, Shengxiang Yu, Yanbin Gao, Jun Ma, Lei Huang and Lei Yang
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(7), 1829; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15071829 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3528
Abstract
Nanofiber scaffolds have emerged as a revolutionary drug delivery platform for promoting wound healing, due to their unique properties, including high surface area, interconnected porosity, excellent breathability, and moisture absorption, as well as their spatial structure which mimics the extracellular matrix. However, the [...] Read more.
Nanofiber scaffolds have emerged as a revolutionary drug delivery platform for promoting wound healing, due to their unique properties, including high surface area, interconnected porosity, excellent breathability, and moisture absorption, as well as their spatial structure which mimics the extracellular matrix. However, the use of nanofibers to achieve controlled drug loading and release still presents many challenges, with ongoing research still exploring how to load drugs onto nanofiber scaffolds without loss of activity and how to control their release in a specific spatiotemporal manner. This comprehensive study systematically reviews the applications and recent advances related to drug-laden nanofiber scaffolds for skin-wound management. First, we introduce commonly used methods for nanofiber preparation, including electrostatic spinning, sol–gel, molecular self-assembly, thermally induced phase separation, and 3D-printing techniques. Next, we summarize the polymers used in the preparation of nanofibers and drug delivery methods utilizing nanofiber scaffolds. We then review the application of drug-loaded nanofiber scaffolds for wound healing, considering the different stages of wound healing in which the drug acts. Finally, we briefly describe stimulus-responsive drug delivery schemes for nanofiber scaffolds, as well as other exciting drug delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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49 pages, 8908 KiB  
Review
Therapeutic Agent-Loaded Fibrous Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications
by Dongsik Park, Su Jin Lee, Dong Kyu Choi and Jee-Woong Park
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(5), 1522; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15051522 - 17 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1795
Abstract
Tissue engineering is a sophisticated field that involves the integration of various disciplines, such as clinical medicine, material science, and life science, to repair or regenerate damaged tissues and organs. To achieve the successful regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues, it is necessary [...] Read more.
Tissue engineering is a sophisticated field that involves the integration of various disciplines, such as clinical medicine, material science, and life science, to repair or regenerate damaged tissues and organs. To achieve the successful regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues, it is necessary to fabricate biomimetic scaffolds that provide structural support to the surrounding cells and tissues. Fibrous scaffolds loaded with therapeutic agents have shown considerable potential in tissue engineering. In this comprehensive review, we examine various methods for fabricating bioactive molecule-loaded fibrous scaffolds, including preparation methods for fibrous scaffolds and drug-loading techniques. Additionally, we delved into the recent biomedical applications of these scaffolds, such as tissue regeneration, inhibition of tumor recurrence, and immunomodulation. The aim of this review is to discuss the latest research trends in fibrous scaffold manufacturing methods, materials, drug-loading methods with parameter information, and therapeutic applications with the goal of contributing to the development of new technologies or improvements to existing ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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32 pages, 7290 KiB  
Review
Wetspun Polymeric Fibrous Systems as Potential Scaffolds for Tendon and Ligament Repair, Healing and Regeneration
by Joana Rocha, Joana C. Araújo, Raul Fangueiro and Diana P. Ferreira
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(11), 2526; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14112526 - 19 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2166
Abstract
Tendon and ligament traumatic injuries are among the most common diagnosed musculoskeletal problems. Such injuries limit joint mobility, reduce musculoskeletal performance, and most importantly, lower people’s comfort. Currently, there are various treatments that are used to treat this type of injury, from surgical [...] Read more.
Tendon and ligament traumatic injuries are among the most common diagnosed musculoskeletal problems. Such injuries limit joint mobility, reduce musculoskeletal performance, and most importantly, lower people’s comfort. Currently, there are various treatments that are used to treat this type of injury, from surgical to conservative treatments. However, they’re not entirely effective, as reinjures are frequent and, in some cases, fail to re-establish the lost functionality. Tissue engineering (TE) approaches aim to overcome these disadvantages by stimulating the regeneration and formation of artificial structures that resemble the original tissue. Fabrication and design of artificial fibrous scaffolds with tailored mechanical properties are crucial for restoring the mechanical function of the tissues. Recently, polymeric nanofibers produced by wetspinning have been largely investigated to mimic, repair, and replace the damaged tissue. Wetspun fibrous structures are extensively used due to their exceptional properties, such as the ability to mimic the native tissue, their biodegradability and biocompatibility, and good mechanical properties. In this review, the tendon and ligament structure and biomechanics are presented. Then, promising wetspun multifunctional fibrous structures based on biopolymers, more specifically polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and polyethylenes, will be discussed, as well as reinforcing agents such as cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), nanoparticles, and growth factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber-Based Scaffolds as Drug Carriers: Recent Advances)
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