Bio-Based Co-Adjuvant Systems for Infection Control

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthetic Biology and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 August 2022) | Viewed by 9123

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Textile Science and Technology, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: antimicrobial agents; regenerative cues; drug delivery; biomaterials; wound healing; medical textiles; polymer processing; nano- and microfiber scaffolding systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The excessive consumption and misuse of antibiotics have increased the challenges for a sustained global health. Microorganisms are now developing resistance more quickly, turning conventional solutions obsolete. In an attempt to overcome such a scenario, many researchers are now engineering new biomolecules or optimizing pre-existent mechanisms of action. The adjuvant effect of safe, cost-effective, bio-based molecules (natural extracts, peptides, polymers, etc.) with the potential to fight infections and prevent microbial colonization has served as the foundation of recent studies, which aim at developing systems with a target-directed action that prevents harmful, systemic side effects in the human body. This Special Issue seeks manuscript submissions that further our understanding of the antimicrobial action of specialized biomolecules when used in combination with other bio-based systems. Submissions on the synergistic effects between two or more natural origin molecules with the aim of preventing serious infections from evolving or treating diseases are especially encouraged. The mechanisms of action and the ability of one biomolecule to enhance or inhibit a specific function on another while in the presence of pathogens are particularly desirable.

Dr. Helena P. Felgueiras
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial agents
  • Bacterial resistance
  • Natural extracts
  • Peptides
  • Natural-origin polymers
  • Biomaterials functionalization
  • Delivery systems
  • Synergisms
  • Competitive behavior

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 946 KiB  
Article
Co-Application of Tetramycin and Chitosan in Controlling Leaf Spot Disease of Kiwifruit and Enhancing Its Resistance, Photosynthesis, Quality and Amino Acids
by Cheng Zhang, Haitao Li, Xiaomao Wu, Yue Su and Youhua Long
Biomolecules 2022, 12(4), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom12040500 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1854
Abstract
Leaf spot disease caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae and Alternaria tenuissima is a seriously fungal disease in kiwifruit production. In this study, the co-application of tetramycin and chitosan against leaf spot disease in kiwifruit and its effects on the disease resistance, photosynthesis, quality and [...] Read more.
Leaf spot disease caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae and Alternaria tenuissima is a seriously fungal disease in kiwifruit production. In this study, the co-application of tetramycin and chitosan against leaf spot disease in kiwifruit and its effects on the disease resistance, photosynthesis, quality and amino acids of kiwifruit were investigated. The results show that tetramycin exhibited an excellent antifungal activity against L. theobromae and A. tenuissima with EC50 values of 2.37 and 0.16 mg kg−1. In the field, the foliar co-application of tetramycin and chitosan could effectively control leaf spot disease with control efficacy of 89.44% by spraying 0.3% tetramycin aqueous solutions (AS) 5000 time liquid + chitosan 100 time liquid, which was significantly (ANOVA, p < 0.01) higher than 79.80% of 0.3% tetramycin AS 5000 time liquid and 56.61% of chitosan 100 time liquid. Simultaneously, the co-application of tetramycin and chitosan was more effective than tetramycin or chitosan alone in enhancing the disease resistance and photosynthesis of kiwifruit leaves, as well as improving the quality and amino acids of kiwifruit fruits. This work highlights that chitosan is a practicable, cost-effective and eco-friendly adjuvant of tetramycin for controlling leaf spot disease of kiwifruit, enhancing resistance and photosynthesis of leaves and improving quality and amino acids of fruits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Co-Adjuvant Systems for Infection Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1485 KiB  
Article
Chitosan Augments Tetramycin against Soft Rot in Kiwifruit and Enhances Its Improvement for Kiwifruit Growth, Quality and Aroma
by Qiuping Wang, Cheng Zhang, Xiaomao Wu, Youhua Long and Yue Su
Biomolecules 2021, 11(9), 1257; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom11091257 - 24 Aug 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2577
Abstract
In this study, the co–application of chitosan and tetramycin against kiwifruit soft rot and its effects on the disease resistance, growth, quality and aroma of kiwifruit were investigated. The results show that chitosan could effectively enhance tetramycin against soft rot of kiwifruit with [...] Read more.
In this study, the co–application of chitosan and tetramycin against kiwifruit soft rot and its effects on the disease resistance, growth, quality and aroma of kiwifruit were investigated. The results show that chitosan could effectively enhance tetramycin against soft rot of kiwifruit with the field control efficacy of 85.33% for spraying chitosan 100 time + 0.3% tetramycin AS 5000–time dilution liquid, which was higher than 80.99% for 0.3% tetramycin AS 5000–time dilution liquid and significantly (p < 0.01) higher than 40.66% for chitosan 100–time dilution liquid. Chitosan could significantly (p < 0.05) improve the promoting effects of tetramycin on total phenolics, total flavonoids, SOD activity of kiwifruit compared to tetramycin during storage for 0–28 days and enhance the disease resistance of kiwifruit. Moreover, the co–application of chitosan and tetramycin was more effective than tetramycin or chitosan alone in enhancing fruit growth, improving fruit quality and increasing fruit aroma. This study highlights that chitosan can be used as an adjuvant to enhance tetramycin against soft rot of kiwifruit and promote tetramycin’s improvement for the single fruit volume and weight, vitamin C, soluble sugar, soluble solid, dry matter, soluble protein, titratable acidity and aroma of kiwifruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Co-Adjuvant Systems for Infection Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4263 KiB  
Article
Selenium Nanoparticles as Candidates for Antibacterial Substitutes and Supplements against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria
by Hee-Won Han, Kapil D. Patel, Jin-Hwan Kwak, Soo-Kyung Jun, Tae-Su Jang, Sung-Hoon Lee, Jonathan Campbell Knowles, Hae-Won Kim, Hae-Hyoung Lee and Jung-Hwan Lee
Biomolecules 2021, 11(7), 1028; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom11071028 - 14 Jul 2021
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 3692
Abstract
In recent years, multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have increased rapidly, representing a major threat to human health. This problem has created an urgent need to identify alternatives for the treatment of MDR bacteria. The aim of this study was to identify the antibacterial activity [...] Read more.
In recent years, multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have increased rapidly, representing a major threat to human health. This problem has created an urgent need to identify alternatives for the treatment of MDR bacteria. The aim of this study was to identify the antibacterial activity of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) and selenium nanowires (SeNWs) against MDR bacteria and assess the potential synergistic effects when combined with a conventional antibiotic (linezolid). SeNPs and SeNWs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), zeta potential, and UV-visible analysis. The antibacterial effects of SeNPs and SeNWs were confirmed by the macro-dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. SeNPs showed MIC values against methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) at concentrations of 20, 80, 320, and >320 μg/mL, respectively. On the other hand, SeNWs showed a MIC value of >320 μg/mL against all tested bacteria. Therefore, MSSA, MRSA, and VRSA were selected for the bacteria to be tested, and SeNPs were selected as the antimicrobial agent for the following experiments. In the time-kill assay, SeNPs at a concentration of 4X MIC (80 and 320 μg/mL) showed bactericidal effects against MSSA and MRSA, respectively. At a concentration of 2X MIC (40 and 160 μg/mL), SeNPs showed bacteriostatic effects against MSSA and bactericidal effects against MRSA, respectively. In the synergy test, SeNPs showed a synergistic effect with linezolid (LZD) through protein degradation against MSSA and MRSA. In conclusion, these results suggest that SeNPs can be candidates for antibacterial substitutes and supplements against MDR bacteria for topical use, such as dressings. However, for use in clinical situations, additional experiments such as toxicity and synergistic mechanism tests of SeNPs are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Co-Adjuvant Systems for Infection Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop