Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 July 2023) | Viewed by 22266

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Guest Editor
Centre for Textile Science and Technology, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: antimicrobial agents; regenerative cues; drug delivery; biomaterials; wound healing; medical textiles; polymer processing; nano- and microfiber scaffolding systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoparticles or nanocapsules are an attractive tool used in medicine, responsible for several advancements in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple diseases. Between their many applications, their use as drug delivery systems, diagnosis, and the improvement of biocompatible materials properties can be highlighted. Their large functional surface, quantum properties, ability to bind, adsorb, and carry drugs, probes, and proteins are unique features of nanoparticles, which are very important for medical purposes. Even though inorganic systems are the most widely researched, lately, biobased, sustainable solutions have encountered a great demand as they are less harmful not only to the human body but also to the environment. New approaches to deal with the growing concern associated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the urgency for target-directed systems that act on a local bases and prevent systemic side effects have boosted research on biobased systems as platforms for drug delivery. This Special Issue seeks manuscript submissions that further our understanding of the ability of organic nanosystems to target and deliver specialized biomolecules in a sustainable way, without causing harmful responses. Further, studies that deal with the advantages of these systems over conventional strategies or inorganic nanoscale approaches are very welcome. Submissions on new processing and extraction methodologies for biobased materials, including biomolecules and polymers, are also encouraged.

Dr. Helena P. Felgueiras
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • nanocapsules
  • organic particles
  • biomaterials functionalization
  • biological delivery systems
  • natural-origin polymers
  • organic synthesis
  • target-directed platforms
  • localized drug action
  • antimicrobial agents
  • infection control

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 3344 KiB  
Article
Streamlined Fabrication of Hybrid Lipid Bilayer Membranes on Titanium Oxide Surfaces: A Comparison of One- and Two-Tail SAM Molecules
by Tun Naw Sut, Sue Woon Tan, Won-Yong Jeon, Bo Kyeong Yoon, Nam-Joon Cho and Joshua A. Jackman
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(7), 1153; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12071153 - 30 Mar 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2267
Abstract
There is broad interest in fabricating cell-membrane-mimicking, hybrid lipid bilayer (HLB) coatings on titanium oxide surfaces for medical implant and drug delivery applications. However, existing fabrication strategies are complex, and there is an outstanding need to develop a streamlined method that can be [...] Read more.
There is broad interest in fabricating cell-membrane-mimicking, hybrid lipid bilayer (HLB) coatings on titanium oxide surfaces for medical implant and drug delivery applications. However, existing fabrication strategies are complex, and there is an outstanding need to develop a streamlined method that can be performed quickly at room temperature. Towards this goal, herein, we characterized the room-temperature deposition kinetics and adlayer properties of one- and two-tail phosphonic acid-functionalized molecules on titanium oxide surfaces in various solvent systems and identified optimal conditions to prepare self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), upon which HLBs could be formed in select cases. Among the molecular candidates, we identified a two-tail molecule that formed a rigidly attached SAM to enable HLB fabrication via vesicle fusion for membrane-based biosensing applications. By contrast, vesicles adsorbed but did not rupture on SAMs composed of one-tail molecules. Our findings support that two-tail phosphonic acid SAMs offer superior capabilities for rapid HLB coating fabrication at room temperature, and these streamlined capabilities could be useful to prepare durable lipid bilayer coatings on titanium-based materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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21 pages, 8061 KiB  
Article
Effects of Process and Formulation Parameters on Submicron Polymeric Particles Produced by a Rapid Emulsion-Diffusion Method
by Clara Luisa Domínguez-Delgado, Zubia Akhtar, Godfrey Awuah-Mensah, Braden Wu and Hugh David Charles Smyth
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12020229 - 11 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2017
Abstract
Emulsification-diffusion method is often used to produce polymeric nanoparticles. However, their numerous and/or lengthy steps make it difficult to use widely. Thus, a modified method using solvent blends (miscible/partially miscible in water, 25–100%) as the organic phases to overcome these disadvantages and its [...] Read more.
Emulsification-diffusion method is often used to produce polymeric nanoparticles. However, their numerous and/or lengthy steps make it difficult to use widely. Thus, a modified method using solvent blends (miscible/partially miscible in water, 25–100%) as the organic phases to overcome these disadvantages and its design space were investigated. To further simplify the process, no organic/aqueous phase saturation and no water addition after the emulsification step were performed. Biodegradable (PLGA) or pH-sensitive (Eudragit® E100) nanoparticles were robustly produced using low/medium shear stirring adding dropwise the organic phase into the aqueous phase or vice versa. Several behaviors were also obtained: lowering the partially water-miscible solvent ratio relative to the organic phase or the poloxamer-407 concentration; or increasing the organic phase polarity or the polyvinyl alcohol concentration produced smaller particle sizes/polydispersity. Nanoparticle zeta potential increased as the water-miscible solvent ratio increased. Poloxamer-407 showed better performance to decrease the particle size (~50 nm) at low concentrations (≤1%, w/v) compared with polyvinyl alcohol at 1–5% (w/v), but higher concentrations produced bigger particles/polydispersity (≥600 nm). Most important, an inverse linear correlation to predict the particle size by determining the solubility parameter was found. A rapid method to broadly prepare nanoparticles using straightforward equipment is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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16 pages, 1979 KiB  
Article
Natural Polyphenol-Containing Gels against HSV-1 Infection: A Comparative Study
by Mariaconcetta Sicurella, Maddalena Sguizzato, Paolo Mariani, Alessia Pepe, Anna Baldisserotto, Raissa Buzzi, Nicolas Huang, Fanny Simelière, Sam Burholt, Peggy Marconi and Elisabetta Esposito
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(2), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12020227 - 11 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1762
Abstract
Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection commonly affects many people, causing perioral sores, as well as severe complications including encephalitis in immunocompromised patients. The main pharmacological approach involves synthetic antiviral drugs, among which acyclovir is the golden standard, often leading to resistant virus [...] Read more.
Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection commonly affects many people, causing perioral sores, as well as severe complications including encephalitis in immunocompromised patients. The main pharmacological approach involves synthetic antiviral drugs, among which acyclovir is the golden standard, often leading to resistant virus strains under long-term use. An alternative approach based on antiviral plant-derived compounds, such as quercetin and mangiferin, demonstrated an antiviral potential. In the present study, semisolid forms for cutaneous application of quercetin and mangiferin were designed and evaluated to treat HSV-1 infection. Phosphatidylcholine- and poloxamer-based gels were produced and characterized. Gel physical–chemical aspects were evaluated by rheological measurements and X-ray diffraction, evidencing the different thermoresponsive behaviors and supramolecular organizations of semisolid forms. Quercetin and mangiferin diffusion kinetics were compared in vitro by a Franz cell system, demonstrating the different gel efficacies to restrain the polyphenol diffusion. The capability of gels to control polyphenol antioxidant potential and stability was evaluated, indicating a higher stability and antioxidant activity in the case of quercetin loaded in poloxamer-based gel. Furthermore, a plaque reduction assay, conducted to compare the virucidal effect of quercetin and mangiferin loaded in gels against the HSV-1 KOS strain, demonstrated the suitability of poloxamer-based gel to prolong the polyphenol activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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11 pages, 2557 KiB  
Article
In Situ Crosslinked Hydrogel Depot for Sustained Antibody Release Improves Immune Checkpoint Blockade Cancer Immunotherapy
by Jihoon Kim, David M. Francis and Susan N. Thomas
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 471; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020471 - 12 Feb 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3368
Abstract
The therapeutic inhibition of immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), through the use of function blocking antibodies can confer improved clinical outcomes by invigorating CD8+ T cell-mediated anticancer immunity. However, low rates of patient [...] Read more.
The therapeutic inhibition of immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), through the use of function blocking antibodies can confer improved clinical outcomes by invigorating CD8+ T cell-mediated anticancer immunity. However, low rates of patient responses and the high rate of immune-related adverse events remain significant challenges to broadening the benefit of this therapeutic class, termed immune checkpoint blockade (ICB). To overcome these significant limitations, controlled delivery and release strategies offer unique advantages relevant to this therapeutic class, which is typically administered systemically (e.g., intravenously), but more recently, has been shown to be highly efficacious using locoregional routes of administration. As such, in this paper, we describe an in situ crosslinked hydrogel for the sustained release of antibodies blocking CTLA-4 and PD-1 signaling from a locoregional injection proximal to the tumor site. This formulation results in efficient and durable anticancer effects with a reduced systemic toxicity compared to the bolus delivery of free antibody using an equivalent injection route. This formulation and strategy thus represent an approach for achieving the efficient and safe delivery of antibodies for ICB cancer immunotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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Review

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38 pages, 2494 KiB  
Review
Lipid-Based Nanovesicular Drug Delivery Systems
by Tania Limongi, Francesca Susa, Monica Marini, Marco Allione, Bruno Torre, Roberto Pisano and Enzo di Fabrizio
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3391; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123391 - 14 Dec 2021
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 5533
Abstract
In designing a new drug, considering the preferred route of administration, various requirements must be fulfilled. Active molecules pharmacokinetics should be reliable with a valuable drug profile as well as well-tolerated. Over the past 20 years, nanotechnologies have provided alternative and complementary solutions [...] Read more.
In designing a new drug, considering the preferred route of administration, various requirements must be fulfilled. Active molecules pharmacokinetics should be reliable with a valuable drug profile as well as well-tolerated. Over the past 20 years, nanotechnologies have provided alternative and complementary solutions to those of an exclusively pharmaceutical chemical nature since scientists and clinicians invested in the optimization of materials and methods capable of regulating effective drug delivery at the nanometer scale. Among the many drug delivery carriers, lipid nano vesicular ones successfully support clinical candidates approaching such problems as insolubility, biodegradation, and difficulty in overcoming the skin and biological barriers such as the blood–brain one. In this review, the authors discussed the structure, the biochemical composition, and the drug delivery applications of lipid nanovesicular carriers, namely, niosomes, proniosomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes, ufasomes, phytosomes, catanionic vesicles, and extracellular vesicles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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24 pages, 37828 KiB  
Review
3D Printing in Development of Nanomedicines
by Keerti Jain, Rahul Shukla, Awesh Yadav, Rewati Raman Ujjwal and Swaran Jeet Singh Flora
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020420 - 7 Feb 2021
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 5886
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) printing is gaining numerous advances in manufacturing approaches both at macro- and nanoscales. Three-dimensional printing is being explored for various biomedical applications and fabrication of nanomedicines using additive manufacturing techniques, and shows promising potential in fulfilling the need for patient-centric personalized [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional (3D) printing is gaining numerous advances in manufacturing approaches both at macro- and nanoscales. Three-dimensional printing is being explored for various biomedical applications and fabrication of nanomedicines using additive manufacturing techniques, and shows promising potential in fulfilling the need for patient-centric personalized treatment. Initial reports attributed this to availability of novel natural biomaterials and precisely engineered polymeric materials, which could be fabricated into exclusive 3D printed nanomaterials for various biomedical applications as nanomedicines. Nanomedicine is defined as the application of nanotechnology in designing nanomaterials for different medicinal applications, including diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, prevention, and control of diseases. Nanomedicine is also showing great impact in the design and development of precision medicine. In contrast to the “one-size-fits-all” criterion of the conventional medicine system, personalized or precision medicines consider the differences in various traits, including pharmacokinetics and genetics of different patients, which have shown improved results over conventional treatment. In the last few years, much literature has been published on the application of 3D printing for the fabrication of nanomedicine. This article deals with progress made in the development and design of tailor-made nanomedicine using 3D printing technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems)
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