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Emerging Dietary or Nutritional Interventions for Preventing and Treating Liver Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2024) | Viewed by 3065

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago 8380000, Chile
Interests: hepatic metabolism; hepatic oxidative stress and fatty acid metabolism; liver steatosis; dietary and nutritional intervention in liver diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Carrera Nutrición y Dietética, Departamento Ciencias de la Salud, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile
Interests: bioactive compounds; polyphenols; fatty acids; agro-industrial by-products; functional foods; liver steatosis; obesity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Worldwide, there is a significant and escalating prevalence of gastrointestinal and liver diseases, such as NASH and NAFLD. This trend is attributed to factors like the adoption of a Western diet, characterized by excessive saturated fatty acids and sugars, coupled with inadequate fiber and insufficient intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and other bioactive compounds. Therefore, affecting lifestyle changes and making dietary adjustments play a pivotal role in both preventing and treating gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Conventional interventions entail altering dietary habits to include a higher consumption of vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fish, as exemplified by the Mediterranean diet. Additionally, emerging strategies are gaining traction as complementary approaches. Among these, intermittent fasting and the consumption of functional foods (foods that confer health benefits beyond basic nutrition) have gained attention. However, prior to their recommendation, evidence regarding their health outcome and molecular mechanisms is required.

In this Special Issue, we would like to discuss the future direction of emerging dietary and nutritional interventions for preventing and treating liver disease. We welcome manuscripts regarding the association between bioactive compounds and liver disease but also promising dietary interventions, including intermittent fasting, calorie restriction, and functional foods.

Dr. Rodrigo Valenzuela
Dr. Francisca Echeverria
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • functional foods
  • bioactive compounds
  • liver disease
  • dietary intervention
  • dietary supplementation
  • NAFLD and NASH
  • intermittent fasting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 4227 KiB  
Article
Flaxseed Lignan Alleviates the Paracetamol-Induced Hepatotoxicity Associated with Regulation of Gut Microbiota and Serum Metabolome
by Yongyan Ren, Zhenxia Xu, Zhixian Qiao, Xu Wang and Chen Yang
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020295 - 18 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1206
Abstract
This study examined the protective effect of flaxseed lignans on liver damage caused by an overdose of paracetamol (PAM). The findings demonstrated that administering 800 mg/kg/d flaxseed lignan prior to PAM significantly decreased the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and total [...] Read more.
This study examined the protective effect of flaxseed lignans on liver damage caused by an overdose of paracetamol (PAM). The findings demonstrated that administering 800 mg/kg/d flaxseed lignan prior to PAM significantly decreased the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and total bilirubin (TBi) levels, while it increased liver superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels in mice. Flaxseed lignan renovated the gut microbiota dysbiosis induced by PAM by promoting the proliferation of sulfonolipid (SL) producing bacteria such as Alistipes and lignan-deglycosolating bacteria such as Ruminococcus while inhibiting the growth of opportunistic pathogen bacteria such as Acinetobacter and Clostridium. Furthermore, flaxseed lignan modulated the serum metabolomic profile after PAM administration, specifically in the taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, phenylalanine metabolism, and pyrimidine metabolism. The study identified eight potential biomarkers, including enterolactone, cervonyl carnitine, acutilobin, and PC (20:3(5Z, 8Z, 11Z)/20:0). Overall, the results suggest that flaxseed lignan can alleviate PAM-induced hepatotoxicity and may be beneficial in preventing drug-induced microbiome and metabolomic disorders. Full article
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Review

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21 pages, 2330 KiB  
Review
Dietary and Nutritional Interventions in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Pediatrics
by Camila Farías, Camila Cisternas, Juan Cristobal Gana, Gigliola Alberti, Francisca Echeverría, Luis A. Videla, Lorena Mercado, Yasna Muñoz and Rodrigo Valenzuela
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4829; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224829 - 18 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1639
Abstract
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is pediatrics’ most common chronic liver disease. The incidence is high in children and adolescents with obesity, which is associated with an increased risk of disease progression. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy in pediatrics; therefore, lifestyle [...] Read more.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is pediatrics’ most common chronic liver disease. The incidence is high in children and adolescents with obesity, which is associated with an increased risk of disease progression. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy in pediatrics; therefore, lifestyle interventions remain the first line of treatment. This review aims to present an updated compilation of the scientific evidence for treating this pathology, including lifestyle modifications, such as exercise and dietary changes, highlighting specific nutritional strategies. The bibliographic review was carried out in different databases, including studies within the pediatric population where dietary and/or nutritional interventions were used to treat NAFLD. Main interventions include diets low in carbohydrates, free sugars, fructose, and lipids, in addition to healthy eating patterns and possible nutritional interventions with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (EPA and DHA), amino acids (cysteine, L-carnitine), cysteamine, vitamins, and probiotics (one strain or multi-strain). Lifestyle changes remain the main recommendation for children with NAFLD. Nevertheless, more studies are required to elucidate the effectiveness of specific nutrients and bioactive compounds in this population. Full article
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