nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Ironing Human Health: From Basic Discovery to Clinical Translational Medicine

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Micronutrients and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (18 September 2023) | Viewed by 27210

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: trace elements; homeostasis; ferroptosis; metabolic disease; nutrition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Iron is an essential trace element for human health. Iron homeostasis in the whole body and at cellular levels needs to be maintained to participate in a variety of physiological and metabolic activities. Since either iron deficiency or iron overload can lead to various pathological conditions, iron homeostasis needs to be tightly regulated. Iron can be supplemented through diets. Iron from food comes in two forms: heme and non-heme. Heme is found only in animal flesh, such as meat, poultry, and seafood. Non-heme iron is found in plant foods, such as whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, and leafy greens. Non-heme iron is also found in animal flesh (as animals consume plant foods with non-heme iron) and fortified foods.

This Special Issue will encourage clinical studies, investigations, and basic research progress as well as review articles related to dietary iron supplementation, iron homeostasis, and iron metabolism in human health and disease.

Prof. Dr. Fudi Wang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Iron diet
  • Iron supplementary
  • Iron deficiency
  • Iron metabolism
  • Metabolism

Published Papers (11 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 488 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Iron-Fortified Lentils on Blood and Cognitive Status among Adolescent Girls in Bangladesh
by Amy L. Barnett, Michael J. Wenger, Fakir M. Yunus, Chowdhury Jalal and Diane M. DellaValle
Nutrients 2023, 15(23), 5001; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15235001 - 02 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1315
Abstract
Background: Iron deficiency is highly prevalent in South Asia, especially among women and children in Bangladesh. Declines in cognitive performance are among the many functional consequences of iron deficiency. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that, over the course of a 4-month iron fortification [...] Read more.
Background: Iron deficiency is highly prevalent in South Asia, especially among women and children in Bangladesh. Declines in cognitive performance are among the many functional consequences of iron deficiency. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that, over the course of a 4-month iron fortification trial, cognitive performance would improve, and that improvement would be related to improvements in iron status. Methods: Participants included 359 adolescent girls attending Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) clubs as a subsample of a larger double-blind, cluster-randomized community trial in which participants were assigned to one of three conditions: a condition in which no lentils were supplied (NL, n = 118, but which had the usual intake of lentils), a control (non-fortified) lentil condition (CL, n = 124), and an iron-fortified lentil condition (FL, n = 117). In the FL and CL conditions, approximately 200 g of cooked lentils were served five days per week for a total of 85 feeding days. In addition to biomarkers of iron status, five cognitive tasks were measured at baseline (BL) and endline (EL): simple reaction time task (SRT), go/no-go task (GNG), attentional network task (ANT), the Sternberg memory search Task (SMS), and a cued recognition task (CRT). Results: Cognitive performance at EL was significantly better for those in the FL relative to the CL and NL conditions, with this being true for at least one variable in each task, except for the GNG. In addition, there were consistent improvements in cognitive performance for those participants whose iron status improved. Although there were overall declines in iron status from BL to EL, the declines were smallest for those in the FL condition, and iron status was significantly better for those in FL condition at EL, relative to those in the CL and NL conditions. Conclusions: the provision of iron-fortified lentils provided a protective effect on iron status in the context of declines in iron status and supported higher levels of cognitive performance for adolescent girls at-risk of developing iron deficiency. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1217 KiB  
Article
Alterations in Placental Inflammation-Related Gene Expression Partially Mediate the Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Consumption on Maternal Iron Homeostasis
by Jacqueline J. Masehi-Lano, Maya Deyssenroth, Sandra W. Jacobson, Joseph L. Jacobson, Christopher D. Molteno, Neil C. Dodge, Helen C. Wainwright, Ernesta M. Meintjes, Corina Lesseur, Haoxiang Cheng, Qian Li, Ke Hao, Jia Chen and R. Colin Carter
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4105; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194105 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1368
Abstract
Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with alterations in maternal and infant iron homeostasis that are consistent with changes seen in the setting of inflammation. We hypothesized that PAE leads to alterations in the placental expression of genes related to iron metabolism and [...] Read more.
Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with alterations in maternal and infant iron homeostasis that are consistent with changes seen in the setting of inflammation. We hypothesized that PAE leads to alterations in the placental expression of genes related to iron metabolism and inflammation that play functional roles in the teratogenic effects of alcohol on iron homeostasis. A total of 126 heavy-drinking women (≥1 oz (30 mL) absolute alcohol/day (~1.67 standard drinks/day) or women reporting binge drinking (≥2 drinks/occasion)) and 80 control women (<0.5 oz AA per day, no binging) in Cape Town, South Africa were interviewed prenatally regarding demographics, and alcohol, smoking, and drug use around conception and during pregnancy. Prenatal/maternal and infant hemoglobin and ferritin were measured. Whole-transcriptome RNA sequencing analysis was performed on flash-frozen transplacental tissue samples. Gene sets related to iron metabolism (n = 398) and inflammation (n = 467) were constructed by searching the Molecular Signatures Database for related ontology terms. Principal component analysis (PCA) yielded 59 factors for each theme. In multivariable regression models, PAE was related to 2 iron metabolism PCA factors (PCs) and 5 inflammation PCs, among which 2 iron metabolism and 4 inflammation factors were related to at least 1 key maternal or infant iron outcome. In causal inference analyses based on marginal structural models and the product method, the alterations in the expression profile of genes with functions in immune cell regulation, cytokine activity, angiogenesis, hematopoiesis, and ubiquitous cell processes appeared to partially mediate the relation of prenatal drinking frequency (days/week) around conception to a lower maternal hemoglobin-to-log(ferritin) ratio (proportion mediation = 51.35%). These findings suggest that placental inflammation may be partly responsible for the differences in alcohol-related iron homeostasis patterns between pregnant and non-pregnant adults. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 20731 KiB  
Article
Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Alleviates Acute Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Mice by Inhibiting Ferroptosis via the Activation of the HIF-1α/SLC7A11/GPX4 Signaling Pathway
by Chaowen Ge, Yuqin Peng, Jiacheng Li, Lei Wang, Xiaoyu Zhu, Ning Wang, Dongmei Yang, Xian Zhou and Dennis Chang
Nutrients 2023, 15(15), 3411; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15153411 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1496
Abstract
Ferroptosis is closely associated with the pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), the main active ingredient in the Chinese herbal medicine safflower, exerts significant protective effects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/RI). The aim of this study was to investigate the protective [...] Read more.
Ferroptosis is closely associated with the pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), the main active ingredient in the Chinese herbal medicine safflower, exerts significant protective effects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/RI). The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of HSYA against MI/RI and identify the putative underlying mechanisms. An in vivo model of acute MI/RI was established in C57 mice. Subsequently, the effects of HSYA on myocardial tissue injury were evaluated by histology. Lipid peroxidation and myocardial injury marker contents in myocardial tissue and serum and iron contents in myocardial tissue were determined using biochemical assays. Mitochondrial damage was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were induced in vitro by oxygen–glucose deprivation/reoxygenation, and ferroptosis inducer erastin was administered to detect ferroptosis-related indicators, oxidative-stress-related indicators, and expressions of ferroptosis-related proteins and HIF-1α. In MI/RI model mice, HSYA reduced myocardial histopathological damage, ameliorated mitochondrial damage in myocardial cells, and decreased total cellular iron and ferrous ion contents in myocardial tissue. HSYA increased the protein levels of SLC7A11, HIF-1α, and GPX4 and mitigated erastin- or HIF-1α siRNA-induced damage in H9C2 cells. In summary, HSYA alleviated MI/RI by activating the HIF-1α/SLC7A11/GPX4 signaling pathway, thereby inhibiting ferroptosis. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 1272 KiB  
Communication
Quercetin Inhibits Hephaestin Expression and Iron Transport in Intestinal Cells: Possible Role of PI3K Pathway
by Hanuma Naik Ramavath, Venu Konda and Raghu Pullakhandam
Nutrients 2023, 15(5), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15051205 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
Previous studies demonstrated that quercetin, a polyphenolic compound, inhibits the transport of iron by down-regulation of ferroportin (FPN1), an iron export protein. We have previously demonstrated that activation of the PI3K signaling pathway by zinc stimulates the intestinal iron uptake and transport by [...] Read more.
Previous studies demonstrated that quercetin, a polyphenolic compound, inhibits the transport of iron by down-regulation of ferroportin (FPN1), an iron export protein. We have previously demonstrated that activation of the PI3K signaling pathway by zinc stimulates the intestinal iron uptake and transport by stimulating the expression of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) dependent divalent metal iron transporter 1 (DMT1, apical iron transporter) expression and caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) dependent hephaestin (HEPH, basolateral ferroxidase required for iron oxidation) expression, respectively. Since polyphenols are antagonists of the PI3K pathway, we hypothesized that quercetin might inhibit basolateral iron transport via the down-regulation of hephaestin (HEPH). Here in we investigated the effect of quercetin on iron uptake, transport, and expression of iron transporters in intestinal cells. In differentiated Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports, quercetin inhibited the basolateral iron transport while increasing the iron uptake, possibly due to higher cellular retention. Further, quercetin down-regulated the protein and mRNA expression of HEPH and FPN1 but not that of IRP2 or DMT1. In addition, quercetin also abrogated the zinc-induced Akt, CDX2 phosphorylation, and HEPH expression. Together these results suggest that inhibition of iron transport by quercetin is mediated via the down-regulation of CDX2-dependent HEPH expression via inhibition of the PI3K pathway. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 4137 KiB  
Article
Biomimetic Nanozymes Suppressed Ferroptosis to Ameliorate Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity via Synergetic Effect of Antioxidant Stress and GPX4 Restoration
by Yunpeng Zhang, Shuang Liu, Jing Peng, Shifeng Cheng, Qingling Zhang, Nan Zhang, Zandong Zhou, Yue Zhang, Yang Zhao and Tong Liu
Nutrients 2023, 15(5), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15051090 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2281
Abstract
Mitochondria-dependent ferroptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC), which remains a clinical challenge due to the lack of effective interventions. Cerium oxide (CeO2), a representative nanozyme, has attracted much attention because of its antioxidant properties. [...] Read more.
Mitochondria-dependent ferroptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC), which remains a clinical challenge due to the lack of effective interventions. Cerium oxide (CeO2), a representative nanozyme, has attracted much attention because of its antioxidant properties. This study evaluated CeO2-based nanozymes for the prevention and treatment of DIC in vitro and in vivo by adding nanoparticles (NPs), which were synthesized by biomineralization, to the culture or giving them to the mice, and the ferroptosis-specific inhibitor ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1) was used as control. The prepared NPs exhibited an excellent antioxidant response and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4)-depended bioregulation, with the additional merits of bio-clearance and long retention in the heart. The experiments showed that NP treatment could significantly reverse myocardial structural and electrical remodeling, and reduce myocardial necrosis. These cardioprotective therapeutic effects were associated with their ability to alleviate oxidative stress, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial membrane potential damage, with a superior efficiency to the Fer-1. The study also found that the NPs significantly restored the expression of GPX4 and mitochondrial-associated proteins, thereby restoring mitochondria-dependent ferroptosis. Therefore, the study provides some insights into the role of ferroptosis in DIC. It also shows that CeO2-based nanozymes could be a promising prevention and treatment candidate as a novel cardiomyocyte ferroptosis protector to mitigate DIC and improve prognosis and quality of life in cancer patients. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

21 pages, 4848 KiB  
Article
The Ferroptosis Inhibitor Liproxstatin-1 Ameliorates LPS-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice
by Yang Li, Miao Sun, Fuyang Cao, Yu Chen, Linlin Zhang, Hao Li, Jiangbei Cao, Jie Song, Yulong Ma, Weidong Mi and Xiaoying Zhang
Nutrients 2022, 14(21), 4599; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14214599 - 01 Nov 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3324
Abstract
CNS inflammation is known to be an important pathogenetic mechanism of perioperative neurocognitive disorder (PND), and iron overload was reported to participate in this process accompanied by oxidative stress. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of cell death, and occurs in multiple neurodegenerative diseases [...] Read more.
CNS inflammation is known to be an important pathogenetic mechanism of perioperative neurocognitive disorder (PND), and iron overload was reported to participate in this process accompanied by oxidative stress. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of cell death, and occurs in multiple neurodegenerative diseases with cognitive disorder. However, the effect of ferroptosis in inflammation-related PND is unknown. In this study, we found that the ferroptosis inhibitor liproxstatin-1 ameliorated memory deficits in the mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cognitive impairment. Moreover, liproxstatin-1 decreased the activation of microglia and the release of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α, attenuated oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, and further weakened mitochondrial injury and neuronal damage after LPS exposure. Additionally, the protective effect of liproxstatin-1 was related to the alleviation of iron deposition and the regulation of the ferroptosis-related protein family TF, xCT, Fth, Gpx4, and FtMt. These findings enhance our understanding of inflammation-involved cognitive dysfunction and shed light on future preclinical studies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1832 KiB  
Article
Appraising the Causal Association between Systemic Iron Status and Heart Failure Risk: A Mendelian Randomisation Study
by Xingchen Wang, Xizhi Wang, Yingchao Gong, Xiaoou Chen, Danfeng Zhong, Jun Zhu, Lenan Zhuang, Jing Gao, Guosheng Fu, Xue Lu and Dongwu Lai
Nutrients 2022, 14(16), 3258; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14163258 - 09 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2976
Abstract
Although observational studies have shown that abnormal systemic iron status is associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HF), it remains unclear whether this relationship represents true causality. We aimed to explore the causal relationship between iron status and HF risk. Two-sample [...] Read more.
Although observational studies have shown that abnormal systemic iron status is associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HF), it remains unclear whether this relationship represents true causality. We aimed to explore the causal relationship between iron status and HF risk. Two-sample Mendelian randomisation (MR) was applied to obtain a causal estimate. Genetic summary statistical data for the associations (p < 5 × 10−8) between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and four iron status parameters were obtained from the Genetics of Iron Status Consortium in genome-wide association studies involving 48,972 subjects. Statistical data on the association of SNPs with HF were extracted from the UK biobank consortium (including 1088 HF cases and 360,106 controls). The results were further tested using MR based on the Bayesian model averaging (MR-BMA) and multivariate MR (MVMR). Of the twelve SNPs considered to be valid instrumental variables, three SNPs (rs1800562, rs855791, and rs1799945) were associated with all four iron biomarkers. Genetically predicted iron status biomarkers were not causally associated with HF risk (all p > 0.05). Sensitivity analysis did not show evidence of potential heterogeneity and horizontal pleiotropy. Convincing evidence to support a causal relationship between iron status and HF risk was not found. The strong relationship between abnormal iron status and HF risk may be explained by an indirect mechanism. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2178 KiB  
Article
Glycochenodeoxycholate Affects Iron Homeostasis via Up-Regulating Hepcidin Expression
by Long-jiao Wang, Guo-ping Zhao, Xi-fan Wang, Xiao-xue Liu, Yi-xuan Li, Li-li Qiu, Xiao-yu Wang and Fa-zheng Ren
Nutrients 2022, 14(15), 3176; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14153176 - 02 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2158
Abstract
Increasing hepcidin expression is a vital factor in iron homeostasis imbalance among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent studies have elucidated that abnormal serum steroid levels might cause the elevation of hepcidin. Glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA), a steroid, is significantly elevated in patients with [...] Read more.
Increasing hepcidin expression is a vital factor in iron homeostasis imbalance among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent studies have elucidated that abnormal serum steroid levels might cause the elevation of hepcidin. Glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA), a steroid, is significantly elevated in patients with CKD. However, the correlation between GCDCA and hepcidin has not been elucidated. Decreased serum iron levels and increased hepcidin levels were both detected in patients with CKD in this study. Additionally, the concentrations of GCDCA in nephropathy patients were found to be higher than those in healthy subjects. HepG2 cells were used to investigate the effect of GCDCA on hepcidin in vitro. The results showed that hepcidin expression increased by nearly two-fold against control under 200 μM GCDCA treatment. The phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 increased remarkably, while STAT3 and CREBH remained unchanged. GCDCA triggered the expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), followed with the transcription and expression of both BMP6 and ALK3 (upward regulators of SMAD1/5/8). Thus, GCDCA is a potential regulator for hepcidin, which possibly acts by triggering FXR and the BMP6/ALK3-SMAD signaling pathway. Furthermore, 40 C57/BL6 mice were treated with 100 mg/kg/d, 200 mg/kg/d, and 300 mg/kg/d GCDCA to investigate its effect on hepcidin in vivo. The serum level of hepcidin increased in mice treated with 200 mg/kg/d and 300 mg/kg/d GCDCA, while hemoglobin and serum iron levels decreased. Similarly, the FXR-mediated SMAD signaling pathway was also responsible for activating hepcidin in liver. Overall, it was concluded that GCDCA could induce the expression of hepcidin and reduce serum iron level, in which FXR activation-related SMAD signaling was the main target for GCDCA. Thus, abnormal GCDCA level indicates a potential risk of iron homeostasis imbalance. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

15 pages, 4114 KiB  
Review
Nutritional Aspects of Iron in Health and Disease
by Edouard Charlebois and Kostas Pantopoulos
Nutrients 2023, 15(11), 2441; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15112441 - 24 May 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3051
Abstract
Dietary iron assimilation is critical for health and essential to prevent iron-deficient states and related comorbidities, such as anemia. The bioavailability of iron is generally low, while its absorption and metabolism are tightly controlled to satisfy metabolic needs and prevent toxicity of excessive [...] Read more.
Dietary iron assimilation is critical for health and essential to prevent iron-deficient states and related comorbidities, such as anemia. The bioavailability of iron is generally low, while its absorption and metabolism are tightly controlled to satisfy metabolic needs and prevent toxicity of excessive iron accumulation. Iron entry into the bloodstream is limited by hepcidin, the iron regulatory hormone. Hepcidin deficiency due to loss-of-function mutations in upstream gene regulators causes hereditary hemochromatosis, an endocrine disorder of iron overload characterized by chronic hyperabsorption of dietary iron, with deleterious clinical complications if untreated. The impact of high dietary iron intake and elevated body iron stores in the general population is not well understood. Herein, we summarize epidemiological data suggesting that a high intake of heme iron, which is abundant in meat products, poses a risk factor for metabolic syndrome pathologies, cardiovascular diseases, and some cancers. We discuss the clinical relevance and potential limitations of data from cohort studies, as well as the need to establish causality and elucidate molecular mechanisms. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 601 KiB  
Review
Review of the Role of Ferroptosis in Testicular Function
by Xu Yang, Yunhe Chen, Wenxi Song, Tingyu Huang, Youshuang Wang, Zhong Chen, Fengjuan Chen, Yu Liu, Xuebing Wang, Yibao Jiang and Cong Zhang
Nutrients 2022, 14(24), 5268; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14245268 - 10 Dec 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2815
Abstract
Iron is an important metal element involved in the regulation of male reproductive functions and has dual effects on testicular tissue. A moderate iron content is necessary to maintain testosterone synthesis and spermatogenesis. Iron overload can lead to male reproductive dysfunction by triggering [...] Read more.
Iron is an important metal element involved in the regulation of male reproductive functions and has dual effects on testicular tissue. A moderate iron content is necessary to maintain testosterone synthesis and spermatogenesis. Iron overload can lead to male reproductive dysfunction by triggering testicular oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and even testicular ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of cell death that is characterized by iron overload, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage, and glutathione peroxidase depletion. This review summarizes the regulatory mechanism of ferroptosis and the research progress on testicular ferroptosis caused by endogenous and exogenous toxicants. The purpose of the present review is to provide a theoretical basis for the relationship between ferroptosis and male reproductive function. Some toxic substances or danger signals can cause male reproductive dysfunction by inducing testicular ferroptosis. It is crucial to deeply explore the testicular ferroptosis mechanism, which will help further elucidate the molecular mechanism of male reproductive dysfunction. It is worth noting that ferroptosis does not exist alone but rather coexists with other forms of cell death (such as apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic death). Alleviating ferroptosis alone may not completely reverse male reproductive dysfunction caused by various risk factors. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 913 KiB  
Review
Ferroptosis of Endothelial Cells in Vascular Diseases
by Hanxu Zhang, Shuang Zhou, Minxue Sun, Manqi Hua, Zhiyan Liu, Guangyan Mu, Zhe Wang, Qian Xiang and Yimin Cui
Nutrients 2022, 14(21), 4506; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14214506 - 26 Oct 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2794
Abstract
Endothelial cells (ECs) line the inner surface of blood vessels and play a substantial role in vascular biology. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is strongly correlated with the initiation and progression of many vascular diseases. Regulated cell death, such as ferroptosis, is one of the [...] Read more.
Endothelial cells (ECs) line the inner surface of blood vessels and play a substantial role in vascular biology. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is strongly correlated with the initiation and progression of many vascular diseases. Regulated cell death, such as ferroptosis, is one of the multiple mechanisms that lead to ED. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent programmed cell death associated with various vascular diseases, such as cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and pulmonary vascular diseases. This review summarized ferroptosis of ECs in vascular diseases and discussed potential therapeutic strategies for treating ferroptosis of ECs. In addition to lipid peroxidation inhibitors and iron chelators, a growing body of evidence showed that clinical drugs, natural products, and intervention of noncoding RNAs may also inhibit ferroptosis of ECs. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop