New Insights in Molecular Mechanism of Micronutrients Metabolism

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Micronutrients and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 1107

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: trace elements; homeostasis; ferroptosis; metabolic disease; nutrition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: molecular nutrition; trace element metabolism; embryonic development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Micronutrients are vital to human health and play essential roles in metabolism, including energy generation, enzyme catalysis, cell signal transduction, and antioxidant as well as immune defense. Imbalances in micronutrient levels, whether excessive or insufficient, can lead to a series of human diseases. Dietary intake is the primary source of micronutrients, making scientific dietary planning and a balanced diet crucial for meeting the body’s micronutrient needs. The study of the physiological functions of micronutrients has a long history, accumulating valuable experiences in understanding this knowledge. Currently, research on micronutrients continues to make rapid progress, and recent discoveries in mechanisms such as ferroptosis and cuproptosis have propelled this field of study to new heights. Exciting findings have been made in basic medical research and clinical studies. These research advancements provide important insights into our understanding of health and disease, and guide the application of micronutrients.

Prof. Dr. Fudi Wang
Dr. Zhidan Xia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • micronutrients
  • vitamins
  • iron
  • zinc
  • ferroptosis
  • cuproptosis

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 4316 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Causal Effects of Mineral Metabolism Disorders on Telomere and Mitochondrial DNA: A Bidirectional Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Analysis
by Zhijun Feng, Yinghui Wang, Zhengzheng Fu, Jing Liao, Hui Liu and Meijuan Zhou
Nutrients 2024, 16(10), 1417; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16101417 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 571
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the causal relationships between mineral metabolism disorders, representative of trace elements, and key aging biomarkers: telomere length (TL) and mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN). Utilizing bidirectional Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis in combination with the two-stage [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess the causal relationships between mineral metabolism disorders, representative of trace elements, and key aging biomarkers: telomere length (TL) and mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN). Utilizing bidirectional Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis in combination with the two-stage least squares (2SLS) method, we explored the causal relationships between mineral metabolism disorders and these aging indicators. Sensitivity analysis can be used to determine the reliability and robustness of the research results. The results confirmed that a positive causal relationship was observed between mineral metabolism disorders and TL (p < 0.05), while the causal relationship with mtDNA-CN was not significant (p > 0.05). Focusing on subgroup analyses of specific minerals, our findings indicated a distinct positive causal relationship between iron metabolism disorders and both TL and mtDNA-CN (p < 0.05). In contrast, disorders in magnesium and phosphorus metabolism did not exhibit significant causal effects on either aging biomarker (p > 0.05). Moreover, reverse MR analysis did not reveal any significant causal effects of TL and mtDNA-CN on mineral metabolism disorders (p > 0.05). The combination of 2SLS with MR analysis further reinforced the positive causal relationship between iron levels and both TL and mtDNA-CN (p < 0.05). Notably, the sensitivity analysis did not indicate significant pleiotropy or heterogeneity within these causal relationships (p > 0.05). These findings highlight the pivotal role of iron metabolism in cellular aging, particularly in regulating TL and sustaining mtDNA-CN, offering new insights into how mineral metabolism disorders influence aging biomarkers. Our research underscores the importance of trace element balance, especially regarding iron intake, in combating the aging process. This provides a potential strategy for slowing aging through the adjustment of trace element intake, laying the groundwork for future research into the relationship between trace elements and healthy aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in Molecular Mechanism of Micronutrients Metabolism)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop