Malnutrition and Gastrointestinal Disease

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 1038

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
UOC di Nutrizione Clinica, Dipartimento Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche Addominali ed Endocrino Metaboliche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: nutrition; IBD; gastroenterology; clinical nutrition; sarcopenia; disease-related malnutrition; gut microbiota

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Guest Editor
IBD Unit, CEMAD, UOC di Medicina Interna e Gastroenterologia, Dipartimento Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche Addominali ed Endocrino Metaboliche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: inflammatory bowel disease; digestive disease; colon cancer; gut microbiota; intestinal permeability; probiotics; prebiotics; fecal microbiota transplantaion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Malnutrition is a condition that is commonly associated with a decrease in food consumption, increased nutrient storage catabolism, or malabsorption. It is frequently observed in various gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, liver diseases, pancreatitis, celiac and non-celiac enteropathies, irritable bowel syndrome, short bowel syndrome, and conditions related to gastrointestinal surgery. Although a consequential proportion of patients who suffer from gastrointestinal diseases experience malnutrition, there exists a noteworthy dearth of awareness concerning this issue. As such, the likelihood of disease-related complications is elevated. It is widely acknowledged that malnutrition is frequently associated with poor clinical outcomes, reduced quality of life, impaired body function, and a diminished response to therapy. Early intervention involving the provision of adequate nutritional intake in terms of quality and quantity is crucial in improving prognosis. The increasing access to data for risk stratification and evaluation of nutritional interventions and their influence on outcomes will significantly improve the treatment of malnutrition.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to offer new insights into malnutrition in gastrointestinal diseases and to bridge the divide between research and clinical practice for improved outcomes. We welcome submissions (original research articles and reviews) that address these issues, and hope that the content will prove valuable to clinical practitioners and inspire further innovative research.

Dr. Maria Chiara Mentella
Dr. Franco Scaldaferri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • malnutrition
  • gastrointestinal diseases
  • sarcopenia
  • diet
  • celiac disease
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • pancreatic disease
  • short bowel syndrome
  • gastrointestinal surgery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 610 KiB  
Article
Myostatin and Activin A as Biomarkers of Sarcopenia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients
by Małgorzata Godala, Ewelina Gaszyńska, Konrad Walczak and Ewa Małecka-Wojciesko
Nutrients 2024, 16(6), 810; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16060810 - 12 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The prevalence of sarcopenia in inflammatory bowel disease patients has received increasing attention. The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of determining levels of myostatin (MSTN) and activin A (Act A) as potential markers of disease activity and occurrence of [...] Read more.
The prevalence of sarcopenia in inflammatory bowel disease patients has received increasing attention. The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of determining levels of myostatin (MSTN) and activin A (Act A) as potential markers of disease activity and occurrence of sarcopenia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. The case-control study included 82 patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The control group consisted of 25 healthy volunteers. The serum levels of myostatin and activin A were determined by the quantitative sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sarcopenia was diagnosed based on the EWGSOP2 criteria. The study found lower levels of myostatin and activin A in the IBD patients. There were significantly lower levels of myostatin (80.6 pg/mL vs. 186.2 pg/mL; p = 0.0364) as well as activin A (32.1 pg/mL vs. 35.2 pg/mL; p = 0.0132) in the IBD patients with sarcopenia compared to those without sarcopenia. Positive correlations were found between MSTN levels and Muscle Mass Index (rho = 0.31; p < 0.005) and hand grip strength (rho = 0.34, p < 0.05) in the IBD patients. The determination of serum levels of MSTN and Act A may be useful in the early diagnosis of sarcopenia in IBD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Malnutrition and Gastrointestinal Disease)
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