Bioactive Compounds in Foods: Functional Properties, Health Benefits and Disease Prevention

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals, Functional Foods, and Novel Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2024 | Viewed by 3864

Special Issue Editors

Department of Pharmacy, “G. d'Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy
Interests: food compounds; pharma-toxicological evaluation of herbal extracts and natural compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Pharmacy, University of G. d'Annunzio Chieti and Pescara, Chieti, Italy
Interests: food compounds; bioactive extracts; inflammation; oxidative metabolic diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit original articles for publication in this Special Issue of Foods, entitled: “Bioactive Compounds in Foods: Functional Properties, Health Benefits and Disease Prevention”.

Novel foods and their ingredients are actually required to reduce, prevent and treat chronic, inflammatory and metabolic diseases and promote health.

The goal of this Special Issue is to deepen knowledge on the conscious use of food, with particular reference paid to biactive compounds. Including natural products and also extracted from high-quality by-products, these can exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

In this regard, the investigations presented should include detailed analyses attesting to the protective role of foods and their components, together with an accurate evaluation of qualitative and quantitative chemical compositions.

In particular, biological and pharmacological research should also contain an examination of the beneficial activities exerted through both in vitro (i.e., cell cultures, pathogen microbiological strains, isolated tissue) and in vivo models and include preclinical and clinical data based on validated and reproducible models. Particular attention will be given to the chemical composition of the examined products.

Potential authors are strongly invited to submit papers reporting on the identification and quantification of food compounds through chromatographic and/or spectroscopic analyses.

In addition, researchers are encouraged to submit investigations into the characterization of cytotoxicity determination, mechanism of actions, pharmaco-toxicological evaluations as well as bioinformatics approaches based on target–component analysis, in particular for bioactive extracts from foods.

Dr. Annalisa Chiavaroli
Dr. Giustino Orlando
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • bioactive extracts
  • oxidative stress
  • inflammation
  • metabolic diseases

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 3939 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Bioactive Potential of Calostoma insigne, an Endangered Culinary Puffball Mushroom, from Northeastern Thailand
Foods 2024, 13(1), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010113 - 28 Dec 2023
Viewed by 729
Abstract
Calostoma insigne puffball mushrooms are only found in forests with rich biodiversity in very few countries including Thailand, and their biofunctions remain largely unexplored. This study used the agar disk diffusion assay, the anti-glucosidase assay, and the 3, 4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2-5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay [...] Read more.
Calostoma insigne puffball mushrooms are only found in forests with rich biodiversity in very few countries including Thailand, and their biofunctions remain largely unexplored. This study used the agar disk diffusion assay, the anti-glucosidase assay, and the 3, 4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2-5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to evaluate the bioactive potential of these endangered puffball mushrooms. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene analysis identified C. insigne, a puffball mushroom with green, globose, and spiny spores. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis confirmed the polysaccharide structure while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a fiber-like network. The ethanolic gelatinous fruiting body extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging capacity (57.96%), a ferric ion-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) value of 1.73 mg FeSO4/g, and α-glucosidase inhibition (73.18%). C. insigne cytotoxicity was effective towards HT-29 colon cancer cells using the MTT assay (IC50 of 770.6 µg/mL at 72 h) and also showed antiproliferative capacity (IC50 of 297.1 µg/mL). This puffball mushroom stimulated apoptotic genes and proteins (caspase-3, Bax, and p21) via an intrinsic apoptotic pathway in HT-29 cells. In the laboratory, the medium formula consisting of 20% potato, 2% sucrose, and 0.2% peptone was optimal to increase fungal mycelial biomass (2.74 g DW/100 mL), with propagation at pH 5.0 and 30 °C. Puffball mushrooms are consumed as local foods and also confer several potential health benefits, making them worthy of conservation for sustainable utilization. Full article
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17 pages, 9690 KiB  
Article
Exploring In Vitro the Combination of Cistus × incanus L. and Castanea sativa Mill. Extracts as Food Supplement Ingredients against H. pylori Infection
Foods 2024, 13(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010040 - 21 Dec 2023
Viewed by 712
Abstract
Cistus spp. have been traditionally used for inflammatory and infectious disorders, including gastrointestinal ailments, in the Mediterranean area. Among them, Cistus × incanus L. is one of the most frequently cited species in the literature for a variety of biological activities which include [...] Read more.
Cistus spp. have been traditionally used for inflammatory and infectious disorders, including gastrointestinal ailments, in the Mediterranean area. Among them, Cistus × incanus L. is one of the most frequently cited species in the literature for a variety of biological activities which include inflammatory diseases. Cistus spp. aerial parts are rich in polyphenols such as condensed and hydrolysable tannins, procyanidins, and flavonoids, which show gastroprotective activities. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the biological activities of a hydroalcoholic extract from Cistus × incanus L. aerial parts in gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) infected with H. pylori. The extracts inhibited IL-8 and NF-κB induced by H. pylori and showed antibacterial activity after simulated digestion. Since our previous paper reported interesting results on the ability of Castanea sativa Mill. leaf extract to decrease inflammatory conditions in H. pylori-infected gastric cells, the combination of Castanea sativa and Cistus × incanus extracts was also investigated, showing strong anti-inflammatory activity and inhibition of bacterial adhesion. This association of botanicals is proposed herein as a novel food supplement capable of counteracting gastric inflammatory conditions. Full article
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16 pages, 1829 KiB  
Article
Exploring for HPLC-MS/MS Profiles and Biological Activities of Different Extracts from Allium lycaonicum Siehe ex Hayek from Turkey Flora
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4507; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244507 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 604
Abstract
The present study was designed to determine the phenolic constituents, antioxidant, and enzyme inhibition activities of aerial parts and bulbs of Allium lycaonicum (family Amaryllidaceae). Extracts were prepared by maceration and Soxhlet/infusion using hexane, methanol, and water as extraction solvents. Generally, extracts from [...] Read more.
The present study was designed to determine the phenolic constituents, antioxidant, and enzyme inhibition activities of aerial parts and bulbs of Allium lycaonicum (family Amaryllidaceae). Extracts were prepared by maceration and Soxhlet/infusion using hexane, methanol, and water as extraction solvents. Generally, extracts from the aerial parts showed higher total phenolic and individual components and antioxidant activity than their respective bulb extracts. Maceration with water was the best to extract total phenolic content from the aerial parts (29.00 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g), while the Soxhlet extraction with hexane (22.29 mg GAE/g) was the best for the bulb. Maceration with methanol recovered the highest total flavonoid content from both the aerial parts (41.95 mg (rutin equivalents (RE)/g) and bulb (1.83 mg RE/g). Polar extracts of aerial parts were characterized by higher abundance of kaempferol-3-glucoside (≤20,624.27 µg/mg), hyperoside (≤19,722.76 µg/g), isoquercitrin (≤17,270.70 µg/g), delphindin-3,5-diglucoside (≤14,625.21 µg/g), and rutin (≤10,901.61 µg/g) than the bulb. Aerial parts’ aqueous extract, prepared by maceration, exerted the highest anti-ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical activity (64.09 mg trolox equivalents (TE)/g), Cu++ (83.03 mg TE/g) and Fe+++ (63.03 mg TE/g) reducing capacity while that prepared by infusion recorded the highest anti-DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical (31.70 mg TE/g) and metal chelating (27.66 mg EDTAE/g) activities. The highest total antioxidant activity (1.46 mmol TE/g) was obtained by maceration of the bulb with water. Extracts obtained by organic solvents showed remarkable enzyme inhibition properties against the tested enzymes. Soxhlet extraction of the bulb with hexane and methanol recorded the highest acetylcholinesterase inhibition (4.75 mg galanthamine equivalents (GALAE)/g) and tyrosinase inhibition (139.95 mg kojic acid equivalents/g) activities, respectively. Extracts obtained by maceration of the bulb with methanol and the aerial parts with hexane exerted the highest glucosidase inhibition (3.25 mmol acarbose equivalents/g) and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition (20.99 mg GALAE/g) activities, respectively. These data indicated that A. lycaonicum is a source of bioactive molecules with potential antioxidant and enzyme inhibition properties. Nonetheless, the extracts obtained through various solvents and extraction techniques showed variations in their phytoconstituent composition and biological properties. Full article
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12 pages, 1419 KiB  
Article
Antibacterial and Antiviral Properties of Pinus densiflora Essential Oil
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4279; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234279 - 27 Nov 2023
Viewed by 708
Abstract
The Korean mountains are home to the Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora). Pine needle oil has been used as a food additive and a traditional herbal medicine; however, any health-related properties of its trunk oil remain unknown. Herein, we assessed antibacterial [...] Read more.
The Korean mountains are home to the Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora). Pine needle oil has been used as a food additive and a traditional herbal medicine; however, any health-related properties of its trunk oil remain unknown. Herein, we assessed antibacterial and antiviral properties of essential oil extracted from the trunk of P. densiflora. Th extracted oil was hydrodistilled using a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial activity of the oil was tested using the microbroth dilution technique against 10 bacterial species (6 g-positive and 4 g-negative) and fungi. The extract exerted strong antimicrobial activity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, and Malassezia furfur (minimum inhibitory concentration = 10 mL/L). Additionally, it exhibited dose-dependent activity against influenza virus A and feline coronavirus. Furthermore, among 20 identified constituents accounting for 98.7% of the oil contents, the major components included 3-cyclohexene-1-methanol (10.12%), 2-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-2-propanol (9.09%), fenchone (8.14%), O-isopropyltoluene (6.35%), and isothymol methyl ether (6.14%). The P. densiflora trunk essential oil showed antibacterial and antiviral activities that depended on its chemical composition and the microbial strains tested herein. The essential oil can be used as an antimicrobial agent and disinfectant. Full article
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Review

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21 pages, 340 KiB  
Review
Grape Pomace—Advances in Its Bioactivity, Health Benefits, and Food Applications
Foods 2024, 13(4), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040580 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 716
Abstract
From a circular economy perspective, the appropriate management and valorization of winery wastes and by-products are crucial for sustainable development. Nowadays, grape pomace (GP) has attracted increasing interest within the food field due to its valuable content, comprising nutritional and bioactive compounds (e.g., [...] Read more.
From a circular economy perspective, the appropriate management and valorization of winery wastes and by-products are crucial for sustainable development. Nowadays, grape pomace (GP) has attracted increasing interest within the food field due to its valuable content, comprising nutritional and bioactive compounds (e.g., polyphenols, organic and fatty acids, vitamins, etc.). Particularly, GP polyphenols have been recognized as exhibiting technological and health-promoting effects in different food and biological systems. Hence, GP valorization is a step toward offering new functional foods and contributing to solving waste management problems in the wine industry. On this basis, the use of GP as a food additive/ingredient in the development of novel products with technological and functional advantages has recently been proposed. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the bioactivity and health-promoting effects of polyphenolic-rich extracts from GP samples. Advances in GP incorporation into food formulations (enhancement of physicochemical, sensory, and nutritional quality) and information supporting the intellectual property related to GP potential applications in the food industry are also discussed. Full article
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