Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710). This special issue belongs to the section "Malting, Brewing and Beer".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2024 | Viewed by 5795

Special Issue Editors

REQUIMTE/LAQV-Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: analytical chemistry; bioanalytical chemistry; chromatography; mass spectrometry; food chemistry; food analysis; food control; food quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: health-promoting compounds in brewing raw materials (hops, barley and beer); microbiological, colloidal, and sensorial stability of beer; microbial contaminants in beer and raw materials; authentication of beer and brewing raw materials; study of the properties of brewing yeast; formation, stability, and decomposition of beer foam; development of new products; development of new analytical methods
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Considering the success of the previous Special Issue, we are pleased to announce that we are launching a second Special Issue on the topic "Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition".

The Special Issue will continue to present a collection of feature papers on the recent developments in malting and brewing processes, considering the use of traditional and alternative raw materials, conventional and non-conventional technologies, microorganisms, innovative processes, and emerging technologies to control and improve the production of beer.

This Special Issue is seeking papers that feature original research, as well as review articles. The journal offers a high-quality peer-review and rapid publication process. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Luis F. Guido
Prof. Dr. Pavel Dostálek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • beer
  • brewing
  • malting
  • microorganisms

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 3759 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Malting Suitability and Brewing Quality of Different Rice Cultivars
Beverages 2024, 10(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages10010016 - 01 Feb 2024
Viewed by 592
Abstract
Nineteen globally diverse rice cultivars were analyzed for various chemical parameters important to malting, including germination energy, protein, apparent amylose content, and gelatinization temperatures (GT). The rice cultivars were then malted, and congress mashes were produced. Several parameters important to brewing were then [...] Read more.
Nineteen globally diverse rice cultivars were analyzed for various chemical parameters important to malting, including germination energy, protein, apparent amylose content, and gelatinization temperatures (GT). The rice cultivars were then malted, and congress mashes were produced. Several parameters important to brewing were then assessed in the malts and worts (i.e., extract, soluble protein, free amino nitrogen (FAN), GT, etc.). The rice malts produced were saccharified to varying degrees, had high limit dextrinase activities, and contained sufficient FAN/protein concentrations. This suggests their potential to yield robust fermentations in beer styles with high adjunct inclusions without requiring additional nitrogen supplementation. Rice cultivars with purple-pigmented bran were found to yield unique wort colors and could serve as novel natural gluten-free colorants for future recipes. Overall, these findings suggest that malted rice could offer a more local and gluten-free source of starch for brewers and beverage/food producers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition)
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20 pages, 1767 KiB  
Article
Unmalted Cereals, Oenological Yeasts, and In-Bottle Sugar Addition as Synergic Strategies to Enhance the Quality of Craft Beers
Beverages 2024, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages10010008 - 15 Jan 2024
Viewed by 716
Abstract
Craft beer quality is the result of the complex interactions among ingredients. The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of combinations of cereal mixtures, yeast strains, and sucrose added for the refermentation in bottle on the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics [...] Read more.
Craft beer quality is the result of the complex interactions among ingredients. The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of combinations of cereal mixtures, yeast strains, and sucrose added for the refermentation in bottle on the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of the resulting beers in order to maximize their antioxidant content and overall quality. More in depth, brewing trials were carried out with 16 combinations of 2 cereal mixtures (made of 60% malted barley/40% unmalted durum or soft wheat), 4 oenological Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (17290 and 14061 isolated from Negroamaro; 9502 and 9518 from Susumaniello musts), and 2 concentrations of sucrose for refermentation (6 and 9 g/L). If maximizing the total phenolic content is the goal, the best beers were those obtained from the mixtures containing durum wheat and fermented by S. cerevisiae 17290 and 14061. Instead, the best sensory results were obtained from brewing the mixture containing the unmalted common wheat and fermented by S. cerevisiae 9518 thanks to their persistent foam; high turbidity, alcohol content, effervescence, and body; and low saltiness and sourness. The physico-chemical and sensory quality of beers were mainly affected by the cereal mixtures and secondarily by yeasts. The quantity of sucrose added for refermentation affected only CO2, residual sugar, and foam. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition)
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17 pages, 1218 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Rye and Barley Malt and Different Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Beer Volatilome
Beverages 2023, 9(4), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9040093 - 08 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1125
Abstract
Craft breweries are continuously searching for beers made with locally produced raw materials and unique flavor profiles to respond to consumer requests. We explored the behavior of three commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the fermentation of ale beer with a high prevalence [...] Read more.
Craft breweries are continuously searching for beers made with locally produced raw materials and unique flavor profiles to respond to consumer requests. We explored the behavior of three commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the fermentation of ale beer with a high prevalence of rye malt in comparison to pure barley malt. In total, 34 volatile organic compounds were identified, with esters and alcohols being the quantitatively most abundant classes. The yeast strain appeared to impart more differences in the beer’s volatile profile compared to malt. In particular, S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus Y2 strain was associated with a higher production of esters, while strain S. cerevisiae Y3 was correlated to the higher amounts of terpenes together with the lowest relative abundance of volatile acids. Our findings encourage further investigation of the fermentation performance of several yeast strains to produce beers with unique flavors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition)
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12 pages, 2061 KiB  
Article
Exploring Hop Varieties with Discriminating Flavan-3-ol Profiles Likely to Improve Color and Colloidal Stability of Beers
Beverages 2023, 9(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9030067 - 11 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1210
Abstract
While the Saaz aromatic variety remains classified as a total-flavanoid-rich cultivar, no inverse correlation was found between total flavanoids and the α-acid content when the dual-purpose varieties Citra, CTZ, Amarillo, Eureka!, Mandarina Bavaria, Mosaic, Polaris, and Sabro were considered. The levels of hop [...] Read more.
While the Saaz aromatic variety remains classified as a total-flavanoid-rich cultivar, no inverse correlation was found between total flavanoids and the α-acid content when the dual-purpose varieties Citra, CTZ, Amarillo, Eureka!, Mandarina Bavaria, Mosaic, Polaris, and Sabro were considered. The levels of hop flavan-3-ol monomers, dimers, and trimers (quantitated by HPLC-MS/MS) appeared strongly influenced by variety and harvest year. On the other hand, the catechin/epicatechin ratio (and B3/B2 ratio) proved stable within the same variety through two successive harvest years. Among the nine herein-investigated varieties, Citra and Saaz displayed notable catechin/epicatechin ratios (>3.7 compared to <1.6 for the others), whereas Polaris exhibited the lowest monomer content (less than 800 mg/kg). These distinctive profiles could impact the colloidal and color stability of hop-forward beers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition)
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Review

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19 pages, 1473 KiB  
Review
Advances in Extraction Techniques for Beer Flavor Compounds
Beverages 2023, 9(3), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9030071 - 29 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1606
Abstract
Owing to the unique chemical properties exhibited by beer flavor compounds, different extraction methods have been utilized to extract these compounds from the sample matrix. Carbonyl compounds, which significantly contribute to flavor instability in beer, pose challenges in detection due to their low [...] Read more.
Owing to the unique chemical properties exhibited by beer flavor compounds, different extraction methods have been utilized to extract these compounds from the sample matrix. Carbonyl compounds, which significantly contribute to flavor instability in beer, pose challenges in detection due to their low concentrations and reactivity. Consequently, the analysis of beer flavor compounds has focused on improving sensitivity and specificity through techniques that minimize sample preparation requirements and reduce interactions between factors involved in the analysis. Notably, extraction techniques such as headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), and gas diffusion microextraction (GDME) have been successfully applied to the analysis of carbonyl compounds in alcoholic beverages, including beer. Derivatization agents like 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) enhance the volatility and stability of analytes, facilitating their separation and detection in gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Chromatographic separation methods, particularly gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, are extensively employed to identify and quantify aroma/flavor compounds in various foodstuffs, including beer. This review provides a comprehensive overview of extraction techniques and chromatographic methods used in the analysis of beer compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Malting, Brewing and Beer Section—2nd Edition)
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