Oncopathogens

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Vaccines and Therapeutic Developments".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 11535

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the Global Cancer Observatory (GLOBOCAN) of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), funded by the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2018, the total number of cancer cases in both sexes attributable to infections amounted to 2,200,000 worldwide. Among the infective agents, the most common is Helicobacter pylori, responsible for 36.3% of infection-associated cancer cases, followed by the Human Papillomavirus (31.1%), the Hepatitis B virus (16.3%), the Hepatitis C virus (7.1%), and others (9.3%). The aim of this Special Issue is to increase knowledge concerning these oncopathogens; relevant clinico-pathological and therapeutic progress, including novel vaccines; and all those interactions among pathogens which depress the immune system, thus promoting the cancer onset.

Dr. Luca Roncati
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Helicobacter pylori
  • human papillomavirus
  • hepatitis B virus
  • hepatitis C virus
  • Epstein–Barr virus
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

8 pages, 895 KiB  
Communication
Detection of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA and Transcripts in Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC)
by Sara Passerini, Carla Prezioso, Giulia Babini, Amedeo Ferlosio, Terenzio Cosio, Elena Campione, Ugo Moens, Marco Ciotti and Valeria Pietropaolo
Pathogens 2023, 12(7), 894; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens12070894 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 985
Abstract
Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is the etiological agent of the majority of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC): a rare skin tumor. To improve our understanding of the role of MCPyV in MCCs, the detection and analysis of MCPyV DNA and transcripts were performed on [...] Read more.
Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is the etiological agent of the majority of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC): a rare skin tumor. To improve our understanding of the role of MCPyV in MCCs, the detection and analysis of MCPyV DNA and transcripts were performed on primary tumors and regional lymph nodes from two MCC patients: one metastatic and one non-metastatic. MCPyV-DNA was searched by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), followed by the amplification of a Large T Antigen (LTAg), Viral Protein 1 (VP1) and Non-Coding Control Region (NCCR). LTAg and VP1 transcripts were investigated by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Viral integration was also studied, and full-length LTAg sequencing was performed. qPCR revealed that the primary tumor of both patients and the lymph node of one patient was positive for the small t-antigen, with an average value of 7.0 × 102 copies/µg. The same samples harbored LTAg, NCCR and VP1 DNA. Sequencing results showed truncated LTAg with the conserved retinoblastoma (Rb) protein binding motif and VP1 and NCCR sequences identical to the MCC350 strain. RT-PCR detected LTAg but not VP1 transcripts. The MCPyV genome was integrated into the primary tumor of both patients. The results confirmed the connection between MCPyV and MCC, assuming integration, LTAg truncation and Rb sequestration as key players in MCPyV-mediated oncogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oncopathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

23 pages, 816 KiB  
Review
Onco-Pathogen Mediated Cancer Progression and Associated Signaling Pathways in Cancer Development
by Sandra Kannampuzha, Abilash Valsala Gopalakrishnan, Hafiza Padinharayil, Reema Rose Alappat, Kavya V. Anilkumar, Alex George, Abhijit Dey, Balachandar Vellingiri, Harishkumar Madhyastha, Raja Ganesan, Thiyagarajan Ramesh, Rama Jayaraj and D. S. Prabakaran
Pathogens 2023, 12(6), 770; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens12060770 - 28 May 2023
Viewed by 1649
Abstract
Infection with viruses, bacteria, and parasites are thought to be the underlying cause of about 8–17% of the world’s cancer burden, i.e., approximately one in every five malignancies globally is caused by an infectious pathogen. Oncogenesis is thought to be aided by eleven [...] Read more.
Infection with viruses, bacteria, and parasites are thought to be the underlying cause of about 8–17% of the world’s cancer burden, i.e., approximately one in every five malignancies globally is caused by an infectious pathogen. Oncogenesis is thought to be aided by eleven major pathogens. It is crucial to identify microorganisms that potentially act as human carcinogens and to understand how exposure to such pathogens occur as well as the following carcinogenic pathways they induce. Gaining knowledge in this field will give important suggestions for effective pathogen-driven cancer care, control, and, ultimately, prevention. This review will mainly focus on the major onco-pathogens and the types of cancer caused by them. It will also discuss the major pathways which, when altered, lead to the progression of these cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oncopathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1115 KiB  
Review
HPV and Cervical Cancer: A Review of Epidemiology and Screening Uptake in the UK
by Sunyoung Choi, Ayden Ismail, George Pappas-Gogos and Stergios Boussios
Pathogens 2023, 12(2), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens12020298 - 11 Feb 2023
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 8371
Abstract
Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in females worldwide, and a leading cause of death in the United Kingdom (UK). The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the strongest risk factor for developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. Across the UK, the national [...] Read more.
Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in females worldwide, and a leading cause of death in the United Kingdom (UK). The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the strongest risk factor for developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. Across the UK, the national HPV immunisation programme, introduced in 2008, has been successful in protecting against HPV-related infections. Furthermore, the National Health Service (NHS) implemented the cytology-based cervical cancer screening service to all females aged 25 to 64, which has observed a decline in cervical cancer incidence. In the UK, there has been an overall decline in age-appropriate coverage since April 2010. In 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted NHS cancer screening and immunisation programmes, leading to a 6.8% decreased uptake of cervical cancer screening from the previous year. Engagement with screening has also been associated with social deprivation. In England, incidence rates of cervical cancer were reported to be 65% higher in the most deprived areas compared to the least, with lifestyle factors such as cigarette consumption contributing to 21% of cervical cancer cases. In this article, we provide an update on the epidemiology of cervical cancer, and HPV pathogenesis and transmission, along with the current prevention programmes within the NHS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oncopathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop