Bee Products in Human Health—2nd Edition

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 3395

Special Issue Editor

Institute of Apicultural Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
Interests: bee products; dietary supplements; polyphenol; gut health; gut microbiota; inflammatory bowel diseases;
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Honey bee products, including honey, royal jelly, propolis, bee venom, and bee pollen, or their bioactive chemical constituents, demonstrate interesting nutritional values and therapeutic potential. The biological properties of bee products as immunoregulation, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and antimicrobial agents have prompted preclinical/clinical investigation and applications. The effectiveness of bee products for human health has been documented in various reports, which have extensive uses and applications.

In this special issue of Nutrients, we would like to invite authors to submit original manuscripts within the scope of the proposed topics. Submissions of original research; reviews of current scientific literature, including systematic reviews and meta-analyses; and short reports are welcomed. We believe that this Special Issue, “Bee Products in Human Health—2nd Edition”, will highlight the most recent advances in the preclinical and clinical applications of nutraceutical properties in bee products.

Dr. Kai Wang
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • bee products
  • honey
  • royal jelly
  • propolis
  • bee venom
  • bee pollen
  • bioactive chemical constituents
  • human health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 3533 KiB  
Article
Chemical Composition and Neuroprotective Properties of Indonesian Stingless Bee (Geniotrigona thoracica) Propolis Extract in an In-Vivo Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH)
by Steven Tandean, Iskandar Japardi, Muhammad Rusda, Rr Suzy Indharty, Aznan Lelo, Renindra Ananda Aman, Mustafa Muhammad Amin, Andre Marolop Pangihutan Siahaan, Putri Chairani Eyanoer, Celine Augla D’Prinzessin, Ronny Lesmana, Milena Popova, Boryana Trusheva, Vassya Bankova and Felix Zulhendri
Nutrients 2024, 16(12), 1880; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16121880 - 14 Jun 2024
Viewed by 243
Abstract
Stroke is the world’s second-leading cause of death. Current treatments for cerebral edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) mainly involve hyperosmolar fluids, but this approach is often inadequate. Propolis, known for its various beneficial properties, especially antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could potentially act as [...] Read more.
Stroke is the world’s second-leading cause of death. Current treatments for cerebral edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) mainly involve hyperosmolar fluids, but this approach is often inadequate. Propolis, known for its various beneficial properties, especially antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could potentially act as an adjunctive therapy and help alleviate stroke-associated injuries. The chemical composition of Geniotrigona thoracica propolis extract was analyzed by GC-MS after derivatization for its total phenolic and total flavonoid content. The total phenolic content and total flavonoid content of the propolis extract were 1037.31 ± 24.10 μg GAE/mL and 374.02 ± 3.36 μg QE/mL, respectively. By GC-MS analysis, its major constituents were found to be triterpenoids (22.4% of TIC). Minor compounds, such as phenolic lipids (6.7% of TIC, GC-MS) and diterpenic acids (2.3% of TIC, GC-MS), were also found. Ninety-six Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups; namely, the control group, the ICH group, and four ICH groups that received the following therapies: mannitol, propolis extract (daily oral propolis administration after the ICH induction), propolis-M (propolis and mannitol), and propolis-B+A (daily oral propolis administration 7 days prior to and 72 h after the ICH induction). Neurocognitive functions of the rats were analyzed using the rotarod challenge and Morris water maze. In addition, the expression of NF-κB, SUR1-TRPM4, MMP-9, and Aquaporin-4 was analyzed using immunohistochemical methods. A TUNEL assay was used to assess the percentage of apoptotic cells. Mannitol significantly improved cognitive–motor functions in the ICH group, evidenced by improved rotarod and Morris water maze completion times, and lowered SUR-1 and Aquaporin-4 levels. It also significantly decreased cerebral edema by day 3. Similarly, propolis treatments (propolis-A and propolis-B+A) showed comparable improvements in these tests and reduced edema. Moreover, combining propolis with mannitol (propolis-M) further enhanced these effects, particularly in reducing edema and the Virchow-Robin space. These findings highlight the potential of propolis from the Indonesian stingless bee, Geniotrigona thoracica, from the Central Tapanuli region as a neuroprotective, adjunctive therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health—2nd Edition)
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18 pages, 8915 KiB  
Article
Propolis Alleviates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Heat-Inactivated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus via Regulating Inflammatory Mediators, Gut Microbiota and Serum Metabolites
by Zongze Li, Zhengxin Liu, Yuyang Guo, Shuangshuang Gao, Yujing Tang, Ting Li and Hongzhuan Xuan
Nutrients 2024, 16(11), 1598; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16111598 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 551
Abstract
Propolis has potential anti-inflammatory properties, but little is known about its efficacy against inflammatory reactions caused by drug-resistant bacteria, and the difference in efficacy between propolis and tree gum is also unclear. Here, an in vivo study was performed to study the effects [...] Read more.
Propolis has potential anti-inflammatory properties, but little is known about its efficacy against inflammatory reactions caused by drug-resistant bacteria, and the difference in efficacy between propolis and tree gum is also unclear. Here, an in vivo study was performed to study the effects of ethanol extract from poplar propolis (EEP) and poplar tree gum (EEG) against heat-inactivated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Pre-treatment with EEP and EEG (100 mg/kg, p.o.) resulted in significant protective effects on ALI in mice, and EEP exerted stronger activity to alleviate lung tissue lesions and ALI scores compared with that of EEG. Furthermore, EEP significantly suppressed the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators in the lung, including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ. Gut microbiota analysis revealed that both EEP and EEG could modulate the composition of the gut microbiota, enhance the abundance of beneficial microbiota and reduce the harmful ones, and partly restore the levels of short-chain fatty acids. EEP could modulate more serum metabolites and showed a more robust correlation between serum metabolites and gut microbiota. Overall, these results support the anti-inflammatory effects of propolis in the treatment of ALI, and the necessity of the quality control of propolis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health—2nd Edition)
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18 pages, 2587 KiB  
Article
Citrus Honey Ameliorates Liver Disease and Restores Gut Microbiota in Alcohol–Feeding Mice
by Shengxiang Yi, Gaowei Zhang, Mingyan Liu, Wenjie Yu, Guohua Cheng, Liping Luo and Fangjian Ning
Nutrients 2023, 15(5), 1078; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15051078 - 21 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2392
Abstract
Citrus honey (CH) is rich in nutrients that have a wide variety of biological functions, such as antibacterial, anti–inflammatory, and antioxidant activities, and which demonstrate therapeutic properties, such as anti–cancer and wound–healing abilities. However, the effects of CH on alcohol–related liver disease (ALD) [...] Read more.
Citrus honey (CH) is rich in nutrients that have a wide variety of biological functions, such as antibacterial, anti–inflammatory, and antioxidant activities, and which demonstrate therapeutic properties, such as anti–cancer and wound–healing abilities. However, the effects of CH on alcohol–related liver disease (ALD) and the intestinal microbiota remain unknown. This study aimed to determine the alleviating effects of CH on ALD and its regulatory effects on the gut microbiota in mice. In total, 26 metabolites were identified and quantified in CH, and the results suggested that the primary metabolites were abscisic acid, 3,4–dimethoxycinnamic acid, rutin, and two markers of CH, hesperetin and hesperidin. CH lowered the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate aminotransferase, and alcohol–induced hepatic edema. CH could promote the proliferation of Bacteroidetes while reducing the abundance of Firmicutes. Additionally, CH also showed some inhibitory effects on the growth of Campylobacterota and Turicibacter. CH enhanced the secretion of short–chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, and valeric acid. Given its alleviating functions in liver tissue damage and its regulatory effects on the gut microbiota and SCFAs, CH could be a promising candidate for the therapeutic treatment of ALD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health—2nd Edition)
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