Land Governance Technology and Institutional Reform for Achieving Sustainable Development Goals with Environmental and Social Aspects

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Environmental and Policy Impact Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2024 | Viewed by 3290

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecological Effects in Arid Region, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, 710064 Xi’an, China
2. School of Water and Environment, Chang’an University, 710064 Xi’an, China
Interests: urban flood; flood management; hydrological modeling; water quality analysis; statistical analysis; sustainable water resource management; ecohydrology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecological Effects in Arid Region, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi'an 710064, China
2. School of Water and Environment, Chang’an University, Xi'an 710064, China
Interests: water disaster management; ecological environment protection; water pollution simulation; water environment protection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor Assistant
School of Architecture, Chang’an University, Xi'an 710064, China
Interests: landscape architecture; urban planning and design; urban ecological environment

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Guest Editor
River Engineering and Urban Drainage Research Centre (REDAC), Universiti Sains Malaysia, Nibong Tebal 14300, Penang, Malaysia
Interests: water resources engineering; experimental physical model of hydraulic; numerical simulation/modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a key carrier of the interaction between humans and nature, the land use system is in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs) proposed by the United Nations to improve agricultural land production capacity, promote industrial land intensive and transformational use, build safe and inclusive towns, and prevent land pollution. The seven goals, namely restoration of ecosystems and prevention of land degradation, poverty eradication and realization of land property rights security, are closely related. These goals can be summarized into three goals: efficient and intensive use of land, protection and improvement of land ecological environment, and social acceptance. The ability to predict and manage current and future opportunities and risks across economic, environmental, and societal dimensions, while prioritizing environmental conservation and efficiency optimization, aligns with the public governance strategies put forth by sovereign nations in areas such as energy conservation, technological innovation, and rural revitalization. These strategies resonate with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) proposed by the United Nations, which emphasize intensive production, human rights protection, and ecological environmental optimization. Achieving carbon neutrality and peak carbon emissions are integral aspects of these strategies.

Under the complex international background that human beings continue to face climate change and energy crisis, there are still many challenges in terms of cultivated land protection, land management in flood risk areas, transformation and upgrading of industrial land, and land ecological restoration. It is worth noting that when solving this series of major issues, we need to divide the land environment into ecological environment and social environment for analysis. On the one hand, improper human activities destroy land resources, water resources, and ecosystem services as ecological public goods, bringing about a series of problems such as flood disasters, extreme weather, land salinization and desertification, and fossil energy pollution. The resulting negative externalities urgently need to be eliminated through technological transformation, forward-looking planning, and ecological restoration. On the other hand, issues related to the provision of social public goods such as labor rights, healthcare, income inequality, and data security are also significant points of concern. Promoting the optimization of the social environment also urgently demands effective utilization of social resources, including credit resources, human rights protection, and the business environment, by individuals, businesses, and governments.

Based on the analysis above, there is a need to increase investment in research and development of sustainable land use technologies, fostering technological innovation, and developing technologies and models with independent intellectual property rights. Relevant institutions should strengthen land use planning and management, establish more stringent land use policies, restrict unsustainable land use practices, and guide and incentivize sustainable land use. Greater emphasis should be placed on environmental impact assessments of sustainable land use, quantitatively evaluating its environmental effects to provide a scientific basis for improving and optimizing technologies. Efforts should also be intensified in the ecological restoration of damaged lands to promote the regeneration and optimal allocation of land resources, thereby enhancing the stability and resilience of ecosystems. We call upon researchers to analyze and simulate the supply of public goods such as land governance technologies and related systems from the perspectives of disaster prevention, green innovation, social governance, and international collaborative regulation.

The focal point of this Special Issue is the realization of environmental governance objectives under the backdrop of climate change. This encompasses aspects such as flood hazard defense, land planning, hydrological modeling, remote sensing positioning, carbon emission reduction technologies, and the technological and institutional transformations resulting from multiple stakeholders involved in the development of standards and regulatory frameworks for the provision of public goods related to land, energy, and carbon emission trading. Indeed, the inclusive development of man, nature, and society is one of the key issues of common concern in the fields of environmental science, geographical science, economic science, public management science, and legal science. We look forward to, through academic discourse and environmental governance, particularly in the realm of land environmental governance, synthesizing guiding experiences in technology and governance models across different countries, regions, and cultural contexts. This Special Issue therefore welcomes relevant and interdisciplinary original research articles and review articles. While the emphasis will be on empirical articles, articles with editorial style or those proposing methodological innovations will also be considered.

Prof. Dr. Pingping Luo
Dr. Jiqiang Lyu
Prof. Dr. Van-Thanh-Van Nguyen
Dr. Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif Zainol
Guest Editors

Assoc. Prof. Lili Liu
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arid hydrology
  • carbon research
  • carbon emission rights trading
  • cultivated land protection
  • economic analysis
  • environmental economics
  • environmental law
  • environmental management
  • environmental modelling
  • environmental social governance
  • human rights protection in host country
  • industrial land transformation and upgrading
  • land ecological restoration
  • land management
  • sustainable land use
  • urban flood
  • urban rural planning

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 3965 KiB  
Article
Evolution Process of Urban Industrial Land Redevelopment in China: A Perspective of Original Land Users
by Fang He, Yuan Yi and Yuxuan Si
Land 2024, 13(4), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13040548 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 560
Abstract
The crucial role of urban industrial land redevelopment in sustainable urban renewal has garnered widespread attention. While some scholars have explored the interest game among stakeholders in industrial land redevelopment, they primarily focus on the government-led model. Moreover, there remains a research gap [...] Read more.
The crucial role of urban industrial land redevelopment in sustainable urban renewal has garnered widespread attention. While some scholars have explored the interest game among stakeholders in industrial land redevelopment, they primarily focus on the government-led model. Moreover, there remains a research gap concerning the impact of government intervention on the redevelopment of industrial land. This article utilizes evolutionary game theory to investigate the interest game between local governments and original land users in the model of urban industrial land redevelopment dominated by original land users. We establish evolutionary game models considering incentives and the combination of incentives and regulations, explore the interest balance strategy, and examine the impact of positive incentives and mandatory regulations on industrial land redevelopment. Furthermore, we employ a numerical simulation to unveil the impact of initial strategies and parameter adjustments on game strategy. The research results are as follows: (1) Under the original land user-led redevelopment model, only two evolutionary stability strategies exist: either the original land users implement industrial land redevelopment with positive responses from local governments, or neither party advances the process. (2) Government intervention is pivotal in facilitating the redevelopment of inefficient industrial land as economic subsidies and punitive measures motivate more participants to adopt proactive strategies. (3) The increase in government support positively correlates with the likelihood of industrial land redevelopment implementation by original land users. (4) The interests and costs of original land users emerge as crucial parameters influencing strategic decisions. This study enriches the understanding of the interests of core participants in industrial land redevelopment and provides valuable insights for sustainable urban renewal. Full article
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17 pages, 4787 KiB  
Article
Runoff and Sediment Deposition Characteristics of Gravel-Mulched Land: An Experimental Study
by Shuangtao Wang, Pingping Luo, Wangcheng Li, Jiqiang Lyu and Meimei Zhou
Land 2024, 13(4), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13040445 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 605
Abstract
The hydrological characteristics of gravel-containing soils are different from those of gravel-free soils, so it is worth further understanding and enriching the theory of soil and water conservation. In this study, adjustable slope (10°, 20°, 30°) test soil boxes with different surface gravel [...] Read more.
The hydrological characteristics of gravel-containing soils are different from those of gravel-free soils, so it is worth further understanding and enriching the theory of soil and water conservation. In this study, adjustable slope (10°, 20°, 30°) test soil boxes with different surface gravel contents (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%) were prepared to study the runoff erosion characteristics of gravel-covered land slopes under different rainfall conditions (10 mm/h, 20 mm/h, 30 mm/h). Compared with the bare soil, the runoff start time of the three slopes covered with 100% soil surface gravel content is delayed by 38.90, 32.83 and 73.39%, the runoff producing rate of gravel condition under different slopes decreased by 7.20–71.52% and the total amount of sediment yield decreased by 7.94~84.57%. Surface gravel cover can effectively reduce runoff and sediment yield, which is beneficial for better soil and water conservation. The results of this study have a certain reference value for the theory of soil and water conservation and can be used as a basis for guiding efficient agricultural production in gravel-mulched land and construction (like road slope improvement). Full article
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18 pages, 17647 KiB  
Article
Quantifying Spatiotemporal Characteristics and Identifying Influential Factors of Ecosystem Fragmentation in Karst Landscapes: A Comprehensive Analytical Framework
by Xiaopiao Wu, Zhongfa Zhou, Meng Zhu, Jiale Wang, Rongping Liu, Jiajia Zheng and Jiaxue Wan
Land 2024, 13(3), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030278 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 675
Abstract
Guanling-Zhenfeng County, a microcosm of the ecologically fragile karst area in southwest China, experiences rapid population growth and urban expansion which intensifies land use transformation and ecological landscape fragmentation. Exploring the spatiotemporal characteristics of landscape fragmentation and its causes in Guanling-Zhenfeng County is [...] Read more.
Guanling-Zhenfeng County, a microcosm of the ecologically fragile karst area in southwest China, experiences rapid population growth and urban expansion which intensifies land use transformation and ecological landscape fragmentation. Exploring the spatiotemporal characteristics of landscape fragmentation and its causes in Guanling-Zhenfeng County is of great significance in maintaining the stability of the ecosystem and ecological protection in karst areas. In this study, a comprehensive landscape fragmentation index (FI), geographic probe, multi-scale geographically weighted regression (MGWR), and PLUS model were used to quantitatively explore the spatiotemporal characteristic heterogeneity, causes, and future scenario projections of landscape fragmentation in Guanling-Zhenfeng County from 2000 to 2020. The results showed that: (1) the distribution of each landscape index was characterized by obvious spatial differentiation. Among them, the spatial distribution trends of patch density (PD) and largest patch index (LPI) were opposite and the distribution trends of Shannon diversity index (SHDI) and Shannon evenness index (SHEI) were similar. There were fewer heterogeneous patches in the study area from 2000 to 2020, and the landscape shape was more regular and less fragmented. (2) The overall landscape fragmentation in Guanling-Zhenfeng County from 2000 to 2020 was dominated by moderate fragmentation, with the smallest percentage of extreme fragmentation, and heavy fragmentation was mainly distributed in the north-central part of the study area. (3) Natural and social factors jointly affect the landscape fragmentation in Guanling-Zhenfeng County, and there is a significant interactive enhancement effect among the factors, with population density being the most important influence factor. In addition, the effects of the factors on landscape fragmentation showed significant spatial non-stationarity. (4) The characteristics of landscape fragmentation changes in Guanling-Zhenfeng County under different scenarios varied significantly, with the largest percentage of increase in heavy landscape fragmentation under the business-as-usual scenario (BAU), the next under the land use planning scenario (LUP), and the smallest under the ecological protection scenario (ESP). Full article
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20 pages, 6004 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Spatiotemporal Changes in the Gravitational Structure of Urban Agglomerations in Northern and Southern Xinjiang Based on a Gravitational Model
by Difan Liu, Yuejian Wang, Lei Wang, Liping Xu, Huanhuan Chen and Yuxiang Ma
Land 2024, 13(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13010029 - 25 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 863
Abstract
The urban agglomeration plays a significant role in enhancing integrated regional development. Nevertheless, the expansion of urban agglomerations has demonstrated a lackluster ability to attract cities. Presently, finding solutions to stabilize the existing urban strength and effectively extend attraction to neighboring cities has [...] Read more.
The urban agglomeration plays a significant role in enhancing integrated regional development. Nevertheless, the expansion of urban agglomerations has demonstrated a lackluster ability to attract cities. Presently, finding solutions to stabilize the existing urban strength and effectively extend attraction to neighboring cities has become a crucial matter. This study adopts the enhanced comprehensive attraction model, fracture point model, and radiation radius model to examine the level of city attraction, intensity of radiation, and range of radiation in the northern and southern Xinjiang city clusters between 2010 and 2020. Based on the analysis, the following conclusions are drawn: (1) the comprehensive strength and city attraction of cities in the northern Xinjiang region is higher than that of the southern Xinjiang region; (2) the intensity of spatial connection between cities in the northern and southern Xinjiang regions is gradually increasing, and the intensity of spatial connection of cities in the northern Xinjiang region is significantly greater than that in the southern Xinjiang region. The intensity of spatial connection between cities in the northern and southern Xinjiang regions is significantly greater than that in the southern Xinjiang region; (3) the central role of the central cities in the northern and southern Xinjiang regions is weakening, the development of cities in the region is gradually becoming unified and coordinated, and regional integration is gradually being strengthened. This study reveals the similarities and differences in urban development in the north and south of Xinjiang and provides important theoretical reference value for regional urban development. Full article
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