Processing and Technology of Dairy Products Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 15891

Special Issue Editors

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: dairy science and technology; UHT processing and products; whey proteins; thermal and nonthermal processing; new product development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Food Chemistry & Technology, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Ireland
Interests: physico-chemical and functional changes to milk and other milk-derived streams during processing, especially concentration and dehydration; characterization of compositional and biofunctional aspects of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM)-enriched dairy streams; innovative developments in membrane separation technology for targeted enrichment and enhanced functionality of milk-derived ingredients in food formulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is remarkable that starting from one raw material, milk, the dairy industry has been able to produce a large range of consumer dairy products, as well as commodity powders and specialised ingredients with a multitude of functional characteristics and applications. The technologies used and the processes involved in these transformations are the foci of this Special Issue. Papers, both original contributions and review papers, will be welcomed regarding well-established unit operations such as heat treatments and membrane separation in addition to emerging technologies, such as nonthermal processes, dairy-based encapsulation, and 3D printing. The physical, chemical, microbiological, sensory, and nutritional characteristics of the products, and their changes during processing and storage, naturally fall within the scope of the issue.

Prof. Dr. Hilton Deeth
Dr. Phil Kelly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milk
  • dairy products
  • dairy technology
  • dairy processing
  • heating
  • separation
  • fractionation
  • concentration
  • drying
  • fermentation
  • storage
  • nonthermal technologies

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2444 KiB  
Article
EPS-Producing Lactobacillus plantarum MC5 as a Compound Starter Improves Rheology, Texture, and Antioxidant Activity of Yogurt during Storage
Foods 2022, 11(11), 1660; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11111660 - 05 Jun 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2346
Abstract
This study evaluated the effects of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum MC5 on the quality, antioxidant activity, and storage stability of yogurt, to determine its possible application as a starter in milk fermentation. Four groups of yogurt were made with different proportions of probiotic [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the effects of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum MC5 on the quality, antioxidant activity, and storage stability of yogurt, to determine its possible application as a starter in milk fermentation. Four groups of yogurt were made with different proportions of probiotic L. plantarum MC5 and commercial starters. The yogurt samples’ rheological properties, texture properties, antioxidant activity, storage stability, and exopolysaccharides (EPS) content during storage were determined. The results showed that 2:1 and 1:1 yogurt samples (supplemented with L. plantarum MC5) attained the highest EPS content (982.42 mg/L and 751.71 mg/L) during storage. The apparent viscosity, consistency, cohesiveness, and water holding capacity (WHC) of yogurt samples supplemented with L. plantarum MC5 were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.05). Further evaluation of antioxidant activity revealed that yogurt samples containing MC5 starter significantly increased in DPPH, ABTS, OH, and ferric iron-reducing power. The study also found that adding MC5 can promote the growth of Streptococcus thermophilus. Therefore, yogurt containing L. plantarum MC5 had favorable rheological properties, texture, and health effects. The probiotic MC5 usage in milk fermentation showed adequate potential for industrial application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Technology of Dairy Products Volume II)
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15 pages, 1801 KiB  
Article
Sensory Analysis for Cow Milk Product Development Using High Pressure Processing (HPP) in the Dairy Industry
Foods 2022, 11(9), 1233; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11091233 - 25 Apr 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 6789
Abstract
High pressure processing (HPP) can be applied as an alternative thermal treatment of milk to maintain its natural and original sensory quality. Milk was processed at 600 MPa for 10 min or given thermal treatment at 125 °C for 4 s. Sensory evaluation [...] Read more.
High pressure processing (HPP) can be applied as an alternative thermal treatment of milk to maintain its natural and original sensory quality. Milk was processed at 600 MPa for 10 min or given thermal treatment at 125 °C for 4 s. Sensory evaluation of treated milk samples was conducted using the triangle and the acceptance and preference tests. The triangle test was used as a discriminative test to check whether there was a noticeable difference between both treated milk samples. The acceptance and preference test determined attributes of milk including colour, milkiness, creaminess, mouthfeel, and aftertaste based on the 5-point just-about-right (JAR) scale. In the triangle test, 89.5% of panellists were able to identify the odd sample and differentiate milk processed using high pressure from heat treatment. For the acceptance and preference test, 61% of panellists gave higher overall preference for the high pressure processed milk over heat-treated milk. The JAR evaluation showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in all evaluated milk attributes which included milkiness, creaminess, mouthfeel, and aftertaste, with the exception of colour. Overall, high pressure processed milk scored better in terms of organoleptic properties as the penalty value for most attributes including colour, milkiness, mouthfeel, and aftertaste were lower than the penalty of heat-treated milk, except for creaminess. Therefore, to improve the acceptance and preference of high pressure processed milk, future development needs to focus on increasing creaminess of high pressure processed milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Technology of Dairy Products Volume II)
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16 pages, 2506 KiB  
Article
Tailoring the Textural Characteristics of Fat-Free Fermented Concentrated Milk-Protein Based Microgel Dispersions by Way of Upstream, Downstream and Post-Production Thermal Inputs
Foods 2022, 11(5), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11050635 - 22 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
There is a growing demand for new strategies to tailor the texture of fat-free fermented concentrated milk products, also referred to as milk protein-based (MPb) microgel dispersions. Methods should be easy to incorporate into the production scheme, offer labelling without added components and [...] Read more.
There is a growing demand for new strategies to tailor the texture of fat-free fermented concentrated milk products, also referred to as milk protein-based (MPb) microgel dispersions. Methods should be easy to incorporate into the production scheme, offer labelling without added components and be cost-efficient. Thermal treatments are traditionally used upstream (milk heating) and downstream (pre-concentration heating) in the production of these dispersions, though there is little knowledge as to the effects that combinations of different thermal input levels have on final texture. Therefore, this study investigated combinations of thermal input at different intensities and steps in the production scheme at the pilot scale and the relationships with texture. We demonstrated that increasing the intensity of upstream milk heat treatment, in combination with downstream pre-concentration heating, increases gel firmness and apparent viscosity. Downstream pre-concentration heating produces final fat-free fermented concentrated MPb microgel particles that are resistant to post-heating aggregation. On the other hand, omission of downstream pre-concentration heating results in smaller particles that are sensitive to post-heating aggregation. Furthermore, gel firmness and apparent viscosity increase with post-heating. Consequently, combining different levels of thermal inputs upstream, downstream (pre-concentration) and post-production, can produce fat-free fermented concentrated MPb microgel dispersions with a range of different textures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Technology of Dairy Products Volume II)
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21 pages, 5022 KiB  
Article
Goji Berry (Lycium Barbarum L.) Carotenoids Enrichment through ‘Green’ Extraction Method Improves Oxidative Stability and Maintains Fatty Acids of Yak Ghee with Microwave Heating and Storage
Foods 2022, 11(3), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030369 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2695
Abstract
As the oxidation of yak ghee is inevitable and as consumer demand for natural products continues to increase, this study aimed to enrich yak ghee with goji berry carotenoids by means of green solvent extraction and determined changes in the oxidative stability and [...] Read more.
As the oxidation of yak ghee is inevitable and as consumer demand for natural products continues to increase, this study aimed to enrich yak ghee with goji berry carotenoids by means of green solvent extraction and determined changes in the oxidative stability and fatty acid profiles of yak ghees during microwave heating (MW-heating) and accelerated storage. An enriched ghee (GG0) was prepared by high shear dispersion and ultrasound-assisted extraction, while a control ghee (FG0) was prepared by heating and filtration; both ghees were stored at 65 °C for 30 days and were microwave-heated (MW-heating) at 180 °C (15 and 30 min) and 200 °C for 30 min. The results showed that the carotenoid enrichment increased the oxidative stability of yak ghee during MW-heating and storage. The initial CLA and PUFA values of GG0 were not significantly different from those of FG0; SFA increased, and MUFA and TFA decreased. There was a faster rate of UFA loss and an increase in SFA and TFA in FG0 during MW-heating and storage. This indicated a protective effect of carotenoid enrichment on yak ghee. Therefore, the findings in this study support the use of goji berry carotenoids as a natural colorant and antioxidant in yak ghee. This study provides vital information for dairy processors and marketers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Technology of Dairy Products Volume II)
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16 pages, 2893 KiB  
Article
Effect of Dairy, Season, and Sampling Position on Physical Properties of Trentingrana Cheese: Application of an LMM-ASCA Model
Foods 2022, 11(1), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11010127 - 05 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1991
Abstract
Trentingrana hard cheese is a geographic specification of the PDO Grana Padano. It is produced according to an internal regulation by many cooperative dairy factories in the Trentino region (northern Italy), using a semi-artisanal process (the only allowed ingredients are milk, salt, and [...] Read more.
Trentingrana hard cheese is a geographic specification of the PDO Grana Padano. It is produced according to an internal regulation by many cooperative dairy factories in the Trentino region (northern Italy), using a semi-artisanal process (the only allowed ingredients are milk, salt, and rennet). Within the PSR project TRENTINGRANA, colorimetric and textural measurements have been collected from 317 cheese wheels, which were sampled bi-monthly from all the consortium dairies (n = 15) within the timeframe of two years, to estimate the effect on physical properties related to the season of the year and the dairy factory implant. To estimate the effect of the dairy and the time of the year, considering the internal variability of each cheese wheel, a linear mixed-effect model combined with a simultaneous component analysis (LMM-ASCA) is proposed. Results show that all the factors have a significant effect on the colorimetric and textural properties of the cheese. There are five clusters of dairies producing cheese with similar properties, three different couples of months of the year when the cheese produced is significantly different from all the others, and the effect of the geometry of the cheese wheel is reported as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Technology of Dairy Products Volume II)
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