Technological Functionality and Applications of Dairy Ingredients

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2021) | Viewed by 6658

Special Issue Editors

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: dairy science and technology; UHT processing and products; whey proteins; thermal and nonthermal processing; new product development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Food Chemistry & Technology, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Ireland
Interests: physico-chemical and functional changes to milk and other milk-derived streams during processing, especially concentration and dehydration; characterization of compositional and biofunctional aspects of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM)-enriched dairy streams; innovative developments in membrane separation technology for targeted enrichment and enhanced functionality of milk-derived ingredients in food formulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last 50 years, the dairy industry has evolved from a processor of milk and a manufacturer of butter, cheese and powders to a producer of many products, including milk components, which are used as ingredients in a wide range of foods. This evolution has occurred due to improved knowledge of the chemical components, the development of commercial separation techniques, and increased knowledge of the nutritional and functional properties of the components. These developments have been accompanied by advances in analytical techniques that have led to the discovery of valuable milk components, methods of extracting them from milk and ways of using them in food products. These techniques are also promoting an increased understanding of how the microstructure of food formulations may be used to guide the optimization of ingredient functionality and provide supporting diagnostic capability. All of these developments have been driven by research and development, which is ongoing. This Special Issue is designed to capture the fruits of this research and development as they relate to the functionality of the various products now made from milk and their applications in foods, special nutrition products and sports supplements. The scope of the Special Issue covers but is not limited to milk powders, protein products, lipid products, lactose products and minerals.

Prof. Dr. Hilton Deeth
Dr. Phil Kelly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milk components
  • ingredients
  • functionality
  • nutrition
  • milk powders
  • protein products
  • lipids
  • carbohydrates
  • minerals
  • advanced instrumentation
  • food formulation microstructure

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1681 KiB  
Article
Quality of Set Yogurts Made from Raw Milk and Processed Milk Supplemented with Enriched Milk Fat Globule Membrane in a Two-Stage Homogenization Process
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071534 - 02 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2929
Abstract
Dairy products are relevant in the food industries as functional ingredients for several food products and contribute towards human nutrition in ameliorating certain disorders. In this study, set yogurts were produced from raw milk and processed milk combined with 4% Lacprodan®PL20 [...] Read more.
Dairy products are relevant in the food industries as functional ingredients for several food products and contribute towards human nutrition in ameliorating certain disorders. In this study, set yogurts were produced from raw milk and processed milk combined with 4% Lacprodan®PL20 concentration and subjected to two-stage pressure homogenization. The total solids concentration of the mixture was raised to 15% using SMP (skim milk powder). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Lacprodan®PL20 on the set yogurt quality produced by homogenization-induced pressure and its interaction with milk components. The changes in the physical and chemical attributes of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) via destabilization of the membrane significantly affected the physicochemical properties of set yogurts produced from processed or raw milk. There was a slight variation in MFGM-specific proteins detected in the set yogurts. Set yogurt produced from homogenized raw milk (HRM) had a considerably higher water-holding capacity, firmness, and apparent viscosity. The microstructure of HRM was dense and compacted, unlike non-homogenized raw milk (NRM) with large MFGM fragments and pore holes between the matrixes. The inclusion of homogenization showed a remarkable improvement in set yogurt quality, promoting interaction between MFGM components and milk proteins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Functionality and Applications of Dairy Ingredients)
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14 pages, 6635 KiB  
Article
Influence of Emulsifiers and Dairy Ingredients on Manufacturing, Microstructure, and Physical Properties of Butter
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1140; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051140 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3142
Abstract
The influence of emulsifiers and dairy solids on churning and physical attributes of butter was investigated. Commercial dairy cream was blended with each of the ingredients (0.5%, w/w) separately, aged overnight (10 °C), and churned (10 °C) into butter. The [...] Read more.
The influence of emulsifiers and dairy solids on churning and physical attributes of butter was investigated. Commercial dairy cream was blended with each of the ingredients (0.5%, w/w) separately, aged overnight (10 °C), and churned (10 °C) into butter. The employed additives showed a distinctive impact on the macroscopic properties of butter without largely affecting the melting behavior. In fresh butter, polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) emulsifier having dominated hydrophobic moieties significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced the softness. Among dairy solids, sodium caseinate (SC) was the most effective in reducing the solid fat fraction, hardness, and elastic modulus (G’), while whey protein isolate (WPI) and whole milk powder (WMP) produced significantly harder, stiffer, and more adhesive butter texture. As per tribological analysis, PGPR, Tween 80, and SC lowered the friction-coefficient of butter, indicating an improved lubrication property of the microstructure. The extent of butter-setting during 28 days of storage (5 °C) varied among the samples, and in specific, appeared to be delayed in presence of WPI, WMP, and buttermilk solids. The findings of the study highlighted the potential of using applied emulsifiers and dairy-derived ingredients in modifying the physical functionality of butter and butter-like churned emulsions in addition to a conventional cream-ageing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Functionality and Applications of Dairy Ingredients)
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