Polyphenols and Health Benefits

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (8 January 2024) | Viewed by 6824

Special Issue Editors

Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, San Luis Potosí 78216, Mexico
Interests: curcumin; food nutrition; human health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirandisabled, Tlalpan, Mexico
Interests: polyphenols; curcumin; biological activity; food nutrition; human health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polyphenols are essential bioactive components that have been demonstrated to play an important role in alleviating risk factors associated with several chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Due to the rapid elimination, high metabolic rate, and poor intestinal absorption of polyphenols, a clear understanding of their bioavailability is essential to validate their health claims. Globally, cardiorenal diseases are associated with the most considerable mortality rates, and mechanisms, pharmacologic regimens, and nutritional treatment have been the focus of recent research. Numerous studies have demonstrated the protective properties of polyphenols in cardiovascular and renal diseases, showing that they modulate multiple signaling pathways such as cellular growth, inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and proliferation. This Special Issue will focus on polyphenols and especially their metabolites and the mechanism by which they prevent chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Daniela Joyce Trujillo Silva
Dr. Victoria Ramírez González
Prof. Dr. José Pedraza Chaverrí
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenols
  • phenolic compound
  • turmeric
  • anthocyanidin
  • cardiorenal diseases
  • kidney
  • antioxidants
  • vasoactive effects
  • bioavailability
  • bioactive compounds
  • plant-based foods
  • health benefits

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

19 pages, 4171 KiB  
Article
Hesperitin-Copper(II) Complex Regulates the NLRP3 Pathway and Attenuates Hyperuricemia and Renal Inflammation
Foods 2024, 13(4), 591; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040591 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 517
Abstract
Background: Hyperuricaemia (HUA) is a disorder of purine metabolism in the body. We previously synthesized a hesperitin (Hsp)-Cu(II) complex and found that the complex possessed strong uric acid (UA)-reducing activity in vitro. In this study we further explored the complex’s UA-lowering and nephroprotective [...] Read more.
Background: Hyperuricaemia (HUA) is a disorder of purine metabolism in the body. We previously synthesized a hesperitin (Hsp)-Cu(II) complex and found that the complex possessed strong uric acid (UA)-reducing activity in vitro. In this study we further explored the complex’s UA-lowering and nephroprotective effects in vivo. Methods: A mouse with HUA was used to investigate the complex’s hypouricemic and nephroprotective effects via biochemical analysis, RT-PCR, and Western blot. Results: Hsp-Cu(II) complex markedly decreased the serum UA level and restored kidney tissue damage to normal in HUA mice. Meanwhile, the complex inhibited liver adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xanthine oxidase (XO) activities to reduce UA synthesis and modulated the protein expression of urate transporters to promote UA excretion. Hsp-Cu(II) treatment significantly suppressed oxidative stress and inflammatory in the kidney, reduced the contents of cytokines and inhibited the activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor thermal protein domain associated protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammatory pathway. Conclusions: Hsp-Cu(II) complex reduced serum UA and protected kidneys from renal inflammatory damage and oxidative stress by modulating the NLRP3 pathway. Hsp-Cu(II) complex may be a promising dietary supplement or nutraceutical for the therapy of hyperuricemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols and Health Benefits)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

19 pages, 701 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Phenolic Composition and Biological Activities of Six Aqueous Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Seed Extracts Originating from Different Countries: A Comparative Analysis
Foods 2024, 13(1), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010126 - 29 Dec 2023
Viewed by 722
Abstract
Date seeds, which are the main by-products of date fruit consumption, were shown to possess promising biological activities and health benefits with minimal human use. The present investigation analyzed and compared the phenolic content of six date seed varieties from four different origins [...] Read more.
Date seeds, which are the main by-products of date fruit consumption, were shown to possess promising biological activities and health benefits with minimal human use. The present investigation analyzed and compared the phenolic content of six date seed varieties from four different origins (Khudari, Sakai, and Safawi from Saudi Arabia, Majdool from Jordan, Zahdi from Iraq, and Kabkab from Iran). The aqueous extracts were examined for possible antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-tumor potential. Date seed oil was extracted, and fatty acid profiles were compared. The results revealed that date seeds are a rich source of polyphenols, which have been linked to biological activities. Furthermore, the phenolic content seemed highly dependent on the variety, where Kabkab had the highest TPC value (271.2 mg GAE/g DM) while Majdool had the lowest value (63.2 mg GAE/g DM). Antioxidant activities of all varieties were highly correlated with the total phenolic content. The antibacterial investigation demonstrated that the Sakai variety possessed the dominant activity, whereas Majdool showed no activity. The results further indicated the sensitivity of both Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus, with a stronger effect against B. cereus, while no effect was observed against Gram-negative strains (Salmonella Typhi and Escherichia coli). All varieties were able to decrease colon and lung cancer cell viability, especially Khudari and Sakai, with stronger effects against colon cancer cells. Analysis of date seed oil showed high oleic acid content, especially in Sakai. The findings suggest that date seeds are promising candidates for future pharmaceutical applications as nutraceuticals to help combat certain illnesses, as well as functional foods and natural additives that boost the nutritional value of food products, increase their shelf lives, and improve the overall health of consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols and Health Benefits)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

19 pages, 932 KiB  
Review
Polyphenols in Agricultural Grassland Crops and Their Health-Promoting Activities—A Review
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4122; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224122 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1045
Abstract
Grassland crops are emerging reservoirs of undisturbed, natural antioxidants and phytochemicals, such as phenolic acids and flavonoids. The present review will focus on the most commonly cultivated crops, namely Lolium perenne L, Cichorium intybus L, Plantago lanceolata L. and Trifolium pratense L, which [...] Read more.
Grassland crops are emerging reservoirs of undisturbed, natural antioxidants and phytochemicals, such as phenolic acids and flavonoids. The present review will focus on the most commonly cultivated crops, namely Lolium perenne L, Cichorium intybus L, Plantago lanceolata L. and Trifolium pratense L, which have been recognized for their polyphenolic composition. However, these crops are often undervalued and underutilized, yet have the means of potentially creating novel, value-added food and nutraceutical products. Previous studies relating to these crops have identified them as rich sources of caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, daidzein, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin. The key to harnessing the hidden potential of these species is the recovery, identification, and characterization of the phytochemicals they contain. Considering the upsurge of research studies on alternative plant-based diets for the health of humans and the planet earth, there is a necessity to understand the phytochemical composition and the bioactivity that they possess. This review summarizes recovery methods of phytochemicals from the aforementioned grassland crops and their compositional and functional (antioxidant, anti-cancer, and anti-diabetic) characterization and discusses the potential for grassland crops as an abundant reservoir of health-promoting ingredients which can increase the nutritional composition within novel food innovations or within nutraceuticals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols and Health Benefits)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 282 KiB  
Review
Anti-Hyperglycemic Effects of Bioactive Compounds in the Context of the Prevention of Diet-Related Diseases
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3698; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193698 - 09 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1022
Abstract
Diet-related diseases are health conditions primary caused by poor nutrition. These diseases encompass obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, and certain types of cancer. Functional foods and nutraceuticals offer a promising dietary approach to addressing diet-related diseases across various clinical contexts. The [...] Read more.
Diet-related diseases are health conditions primary caused by poor nutrition. These diseases encompass obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, and certain types of cancer. Functional foods and nutraceuticals offer a promising dietary approach to addressing diet-related diseases across various clinical contexts. The bioactive compounds found in these foods are the subject of intensive studies aimed at discovering their anti-hyperglycemic effects, which are beneficial in alleviating chronic diseases and protecting human health. Hyperglycemia is a common risk factor for metabolic disease and mortality worldwide. Chronic hyperglycemic states can lead to many long-term complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy, kidney disease, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This review explores the potential anti-hyperglycemic effects of bioactive compounds, specifically flavonoids and phenolic acids, and their proposed roles in mitigating chronic diseases and promoting human health. By thoroughly examining the existing literature, we investigated the potential anti-hyperglycemic effects of these bioactive compounds and their proposed roles in managing chronic diseases. The goal of this paper was to enhance our comprehension of how these compounds modulate glucose transporters, with the ultimate aim of identifying effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of diet-related diseases. Overall, this review investigated the use of bioactive compounds from functional foods as potential inhibitors of glucose transporters in the context of prevention/treatment of diet-related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols and Health Benefits)
24 pages, 1819 KiB  
Review
The Development of Dyslipidemia in Chronic Kidney Disease and Associated Cardiovascular Damage, and the Protective Effects of Curcuminoids
Foods 2023, 12(5), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12050921 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2901
Abstract
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem that is constantly growing. This disease presents a diverse symptomatology that implies complex therapeutic management. One of its characteristic symptoms is dyslipidemia, which becomes a risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases and increases the mortality [...] Read more.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem that is constantly growing. This disease presents a diverse symptomatology that implies complex therapeutic management. One of its characteristic symptoms is dyslipidemia, which becomes a risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases and increases the mortality of CKD patients. Various drugs, particularly those used for dyslipidemia, consumed in the course of CKD lead to side effects that delay the patient’s recovery. Therefore, it is necessary to implement new therapies with natural compounds, such as curcuminoids (derived from the Curcuma longa plant), which can cushion the damage caused by the excessive use of medications. This manuscript aims to review the current evidence on the use of curcuminoids on dyslipidemia in CKD and CKD-induced cardiovascular disease (CVD). We first described oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and metabolic reprogramming as factors that induce dyslipidemia in CKD and their association with CVD development. We proposed the potential use of curcuminoids in CKD and their utilization in clinics to treat CKD-dyslipidemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols and Health Benefits)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop