Meat and Meat Products in Processing: Microbiological Safety and Quality Control

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 3973

Special Issue Editor

College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
Interests: meat quality control; poultry processing; novel application of meat protein

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit a paper to the upcoming Special Issue Foods entitled “Meat and Meat Products in Processing: Quality Control and Microbiological safety”. Both research and review papers are welcome for possible publication.

Along with the development of the meat industry, numerous novel technologies and processes have emerged in meat slaughtering, sectioning, seasoning, marinating, heating, cooling, packaging, storage and various other areas. For a long period, the subtle balance between maintaining meat quality and safety control has drawn considerable attention from both scientists and industries. Consumers’ interest in meat with higher convenience, less/free synthetic additives, healthier properties and more sustainable processing has also increased considerably in recent years. Therefore, further information will be necessary in determining the proper formulations, parameters and technologies for use for meat and meat product processing.

Researchers are highly encouraged to submit their original works in areas that include, but are not limited to, ensuring the quality control and microbiological safety of meat and meat products in processing.

Dr. Xue Zhao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meat
  • meat products
  • quality control
  • microbiological safety
  • novel technologies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1711 KiB  
Article
Bactericidal Effects and Quality Impact of Peroxyacetic Acid and Sodium Hypochlorite on Chicken Carcasses
by Bo-Zheng Zhang, Jin-Man Kim and Jung-Min Park
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1204; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081204 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 566
Abstract
There is an urgent need to develop efficient and environmentally friendly decontaminants for poultry products. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the practical application of peroxyacetic acid (PAA) as a replacement for sodium hypochlorite (SH) to sterilize fresh chicken carcasses, using microbial, [...] Read more.
There is an urgent need to develop efficient and environmentally friendly decontaminants for poultry products. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the practical application of peroxyacetic acid (PAA) as a replacement for sodium hypochlorite (SH) to sterilize fresh chicken carcasses, using microbial, color, and electronic-nose analyses. We evaluated the decontamination effects of different concentrations of PAA and SH on chicken carcasses. The bactericidal effects of PAA at pH 3, 7, and 9, and SH at pH 10, at concentrations ranging from 100 to 500 ppm on coliform bacteria, total bacteria, and Salmonella spp. were evaluated. PAA induced a similar bactericidal effect at lower concentrations than SH. Therefore, at the same concentration and treatment time, PAA showed better bactericidal effects than SH. Although treatment with PAA (pH 3) and SH (pH 10) resulted in considerable discoloration, the degree of discoloration decreased when the pH of PAA was increased to 7 and 9. Therefore, by increasing the pH of PAA, the discoloration effect on chicken carcasses can be reduced without altering the microbial-reduction effect. Electronic-nose analysis showed that the flavor of the chicken was almost unaffected by volatile components at a treatment time < 30 min. Therefore, this study experimentally identified the optimal PAA concentration for the decontamination of chicken carcasses. The study findings provide a theoretical basis for the replacement of traditional bactericides, such as SH, with PAA for the production of poultry products. Full article
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14 pages, 2220 KiB  
Article
Effects of Wooden Breast Myopathy on Meat Quality Characteristics of Broiler Pectoralis Major Muscle and Its Changes with Intramuscular Connective Tissue
by Tianjiao Bian, Tong Xing, Xue Zhao and Xinglian Xu
Foods 2024, 13(4), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040507 - 6 Feb 2024
Viewed by 827
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effect of wooden breast (WB) myopathy on chemical composition, meat quality attributes and physiochemical characteristics of intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) of broiler pectoralis major (PM) muscle. Thirty-six fillets were classified into varying degrees of WB condition, including [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effect of wooden breast (WB) myopathy on chemical composition, meat quality attributes and physiochemical characteristics of intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) of broiler pectoralis major (PM) muscle. Thirty-six fillets were classified into varying degrees of WB condition, including normal, moderate and severe. Results show that WB myopathy altered the collagen profile in PM muscle by increasing total collagen content and decreasing collagen solubility. The composition of macromolecules in IMCT, including hydroxylysyl pyridoxine cross-linking, decorin and glycosaminoglycans, were increased with the severity of WB myopathy. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis indicated higher denaturation temperatures and lower denaturation enthalpy of IMCT for WB. Secondary structures of α-helix and β-sheet in the IMCT of WB were changed to β-turn and random coil. In addition, chemical composition and meat quality attributes showed a correlation with collagen profile and IMCT characteristics. Overall, this study emphasizes the effect of WB myopathy on IMCT and their contributions to meat quality variation. Full article
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17 pages, 3031 KiB  
Article
The Application of Ultraviolet Treatment to Prolong the Shelf Life of Chilled Beef
by Shuang Teng, Junlan Gan, Yu Chen, Liyuan Yang and Keping Ye
Foods 2023, 12(12), 2410; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12122410 - 19 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1953
Abstract
This study simulated the storage conditions of chilled beef at retail or at home, and the sterilization and preservation effects of short-time ultraviolet irradiation were studied. The conditions of different irradiation distances (6 cm, 9 cm, and 12 cm) and irradiation times (6 [...] Read more.
This study simulated the storage conditions of chilled beef at retail or at home, and the sterilization and preservation effects of short-time ultraviolet irradiation were studied. The conditions of different irradiation distances (6 cm, 9 cm, and 12 cm) and irradiation times (6 s, 10 s, and 14 s) of ultraviolet (UV) sterilization in chilled beef were optimized, so as to maximally reduce the initial bacterial count, but not affect the quality of the chilled beef. Then, the preservation effect on the chilled beef after the optimized UV sterilization treatment during 0 ± 0.2 °C storage was investigated. The results showed that UV irradiation with parameters of 6 cm and 14 s formed the optimal UV sterilization conditions for the chilled beef, maximally reducing the number of microorganisms by 0.8 log CFU/g without affecting lipid oxidation or color change. The 6 cm and 14 s UV sterilization treatment of the chilled beef was able to reduce the initial microbial count, control the bacterial growth, and delay the increase in the TVB-N values during storage. Compared with the control group, the total bacterial count decreased by 0.56–1.51 log CFU/g and the TVB-N value decreased by 0.20–5.02 mg N/100 g in the UV-treated group. It was found that the TBARS value of the UV treatment group increased during late storage; on days 9–15 of storage, the TBARS values of the treatment group were 0.063–0.12 mg MDA/kg higher than those of the control group. However, UV treatment had no adverse impact on the pH, color, or sensory quality of chilled beef. These results prove that UV treatment can effectively reduce the microbial count on the surface of beef and improve its microbial safety, thus maintaining the quality of beef and prolonging its shelf life. This study could provide a theoretical basis for the preservation technology of chilled beef in small-space storage equipment. Full article
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