Advances in Sources, Extraction, Encapsulation, Bioavailability and Health Benefits of Functional Food Ingredients

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals, Functional Foods, and Novel Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5224

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Dental, Morphological and Functional Images Sciences (BIOMORF), University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: functional food; functional compounds; nutrition; chromatography; antioxidant; analysis

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Dental, Morphological and Functional Imaging Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: GC; HPLC; mass spectrometry; multidimensional GC; enantio-GC; sample preparation; miniaturized techniques; flavor and fragrance analysis; food; environmental; green chemistry; phytochemicals; nutraceuticals; contaminants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Functional foods have increasingly gained a attention in recent years due to their potential to provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition. This Special Issue focuses on advances in the sources, extraction, encapsulation, bioavailability, and health benefits of functional food ingredients.

The issue covers various aspects of functional food ingredients, including their sources, extraction techniques, encapsulation methods, and bioavailability enhancement strategies. Furthermore, it explores their potential health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-cancer properties.

Experts in the field have contributed their latest research findings on the identification and extraction of bioactive compounds from various sources, the development of novel encapsulation methods to improve the stability and bioavailability of functional food ingredients, and the evaluation of their health benefits using in vitro and in vivo models.

The Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in functional food ingredients and their potential applications in promoting human health and preventing chronic diseases. This research has the potential to make a significant impact on the food industry and public health, as it provides valuable insights into the development of functional foods with enhanced health benefits.

Dr. Rossella Vadalà
Dr. Rosaria Costa
Dr. Nicola Cicero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional foods
  • bioavailability enhancement strategies
  • encapsulation methods
  • health benefits
  • extraction techniques

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

23 pages, 6309 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Citrullus mucosospermus, Citroides, and Moringa oleifera Seeds’ Hydrocolloids
by Olakunbi Olubi, Anthony Obilana, Nsenda Tshilumbu, Veruscha Fester and Victoria Jideani
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1131; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071131 - 08 Apr 2024
Viewed by 508
Abstract
Hydrocolloids form gel-like structures when dispersed in water and have garnered significant attention for their diverse applications in food, pharmaceuticals, and other industries. The extraction of hydrocolloids from natural sources, such as seeds, presents an intriguing avenue due to the potential diversity in [...] Read more.
Hydrocolloids form gel-like structures when dispersed in water and have garnered significant attention for their diverse applications in food, pharmaceuticals, and other industries. The extraction of hydrocolloids from natural sources, such as seeds, presents an intriguing avenue due to the potential diversity in composition and functionality. Utilising seeds from Citrullus lanatus mucosospermus, lanatus citroides, and Moringa aligns with the growing demand for natural and sustainable ingredients in various industries. This research investigated hydrocolloids extracted from Citrullus mucosospermus (CMS), lanatus citroides, and Moringa oleifera seeds, highlighting their versatile physicochemical and functional attributes. Hydrocolloids were extracted from the seeds and subjected to analysis of their proximate composition, particle size distribution, and interfacial tension using the hot water extraction method. Protein content variation was observed among the raw oilseed (CMS, Citroides, and Moringa oleifera) flours. The protein content of the hydrocolloids surpassed that of raw oilseeds, significantly enhancing the amino acid profile. Furthermore, the hydrocolloid ash contents ranged from 4.09% to 6.52% w/w dry weight, coupled with low fat levels. The particle size distribution revealed predominantly fine particles with a narrow size distribution. All three hydrocolloids demonstrated remarkable oil- and water-holding capacities, highlighting their suitability for efficient stabilisation and emulsification in food formulations. These findings suggest the potential utilisation of these hydrocolloids as valuable ingredients across a spectrum of applications, encompassing food, pharmaceuticals, and industry, thus contributing to the development of sustainable and functional products. The unique attributes presented herein mark a noteworthy advancement in the understanding and application of novel hydrocolloids from CMS, Citroides, and Moringa oleifera. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2344 KiB  
Article
Pre-Treatment, Extraction Solvent, and Color Stability of Anthocyanins from Purple Sweetpotato
by Zhuo Chen, Jian Wang, Yang Lu, Qiang Wu, Yi Liu, Yonghua Liu, Sunjeet Kumar, Guopeng Zhu and Zhixin Zhu
Foods 2024, 13(6), 833; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060833 - 08 Mar 2024
Viewed by 569
Abstract
Purple sweetpotato anthocyanins (PSPA) exhibit significant potential as food colorants with associated health benefits. However, challenges related to browning and instability have hindered the application of PSPA. In this study, various pre-treatments and solvents for PSPA extraction were evaluated based on color, anthocyanin [...] Read more.
Purple sweetpotato anthocyanins (PSPA) exhibit significant potential as food colorants with associated health benefits. However, challenges related to browning and instability have hindered the application of PSPA. In this study, various pre-treatments and solvents for PSPA extraction were evaluated based on color, anthocyanin yields, antioxidant capabilities, and brown index. Browning markedly influenced the color and reduced the antioxidant capacity. Optimal results were obtained with the pre-treatment of “steaming of unpeeled whole sweetpotato” and the solvent “1% citric acid-ddH2O”. Furthermore, the color stability of purified PSPA solutions was evaluated under pH levels from 1 to 13 at 25 °C and 65 °C. The PSPA solutions showed a color spectrum from magenta, blue/green, and then to yellow across the pH range. The blue/green hues at pH 10–12 rapidly degraded, while the magenta hue at lower pH showed higher color stability. Elevated temperatures significantly accelerated the PSPA degradation. However, PSPA solutions at pH 1–2 exhibited remarkable color stability, with no spectral decay at either 65 °C for 12 h or 25 °C for 32 days. These results provide valid guidance for the extraction, preservation, and application of PSPA in the food industry. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 4505 KiB  
Article
Structural Characterization and In Vitro Antioxidant Activity of a Novel Polysaccharide from Summer–Autumn Tea
by Miao Cao, Zheng Cao, Juanjuan Tian, Wenping Lv and Hongxin Wang
Foods 2024, 13(6), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060821 - 07 Mar 2024
Viewed by 733
Abstract
To enhance the utilization of summer–autumn tea, a water-soluble polysaccharide (D1N1) was isolated through a series of techniques including hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and column chromatography. The structure of D1N1 was determined through the utilization of ultraviolet, Fourier-transform infrared, high-performance anion-exchange chromatography, [...] Read more.
To enhance the utilization of summer–autumn tea, a water-soluble polysaccharide (D1N1) was isolated through a series of techniques including hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and column chromatography. The structure of D1N1 was determined through the utilization of ultraviolet, Fourier-transform infrared, high-performance anion-exchange chromatography, gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. The results revealed that glucose was the predominant component of D1N1, accounting for 95% of its composition. Additionally, D1N1 also contained galactose, arabinose, and rhamnose. The molecular weight (Mw) of D1N1 was determined to be 224.71 kDa. The backbone of D1N1 consisted of →4)-α-D -Glcp (1→, →3,4)-α-D-Galp-(1→, →4,6)-α-D -Glcp (1→ at a molar ratio of 35:1:1, and branching at the O-3 position of →3,4)-α-D-Galp-(1→ and O-6 position of →4,6)-α-D-Glcp (1→ with α-D -Glcp (1→. In addition, the antioxidant activity of D1N1 was also evaluated. D1N1 exhibited excellent antioxidant bioactivity against the DPPH, superoxide anion radical, and ABTS+ radical. These findings provide a theoretical basis for the application of summer–autumn tea polysaccharide as a potential functional food. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 3176 KiB  
Article
Black Wheat Extracts (Arriheuk) Regulate Adipogenesis and Lipolysis via Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP) Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)/Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) Signaling Pathways
by Young Yoon, Min-Kyung Park, Kyung-Hoon Kim and Geum-Hwa Lee
Foods 2023, 12(14), 2727; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12142727 - 18 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1146
Abstract
Polyphenols and other compounds with antioxidant properties are found in plants and are one of the main antioxidants proven to reduce body weight and the risk of insulin resistance. Still, the mechanism behind the protective effects against obesity remains unclear. Thus, the study [...] Read more.
Polyphenols and other compounds with antioxidant properties are found in plants and are one of the main antioxidants proven to reduce body weight and the risk of insulin resistance. Still, the mechanism behind the protective effects against obesity remains unclear. Thus, the study aims to assess the impact of flavonoid-rich arriheuk extract, a purple wheat extract, on mitochondrial function using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and investigate the molecular mechanism behind its protective effects against adipogenesis and lipolysis. The study findings strongly indicate that arriheuk significantly suppressed triglyceride levels and inhibited the expression of transcription factors like C/EBPα and PPARγ in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, treatment with arriheuk suppressed the expression of SREBP1c and FAS proteins linked to lipogenesis. In addition, treatment with arriheuk extract decreased the mRNA levels of adipogenic transcription factors, increased glycerol release, and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Interestingly, the arriheuk-mediated PGC-1α expression triggered mitochondrial biogenesis by promoting the AMPK phosphorylation and SIRT1 expression in adipocytes. Also, arriheuk suppressed adipogenesis and elicited browning through the AMPK- and SIRT1-associated pathways. Collectively, these findings strongly suggest that arriheuk extract regulates browning in 3T3-L1 white adipocytes by triggering the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway, indicating the prospective applications of arriheuk as a functional food to control obesity. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 742 KiB  
Review
The Role of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods in Skin Cancer: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential
by Lucia Peterle, Serena Sanfilippo, Francesco Borgia, Federica Li Pomi, Rossella Vadalà, Rosaria Costa, Nicola Cicero and Sebastiano Gangemi
Foods 2023, 12(13), 2629; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12132629 - 07 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1751
Abstract
Skin cancer is a prevalent type of cancer worldwide and has a high growth rate compared to other diseases. Although modern targeted therapies have improved the management of cutaneous neoplasms, there is an urgent requirement for a safer, more affordable, and effective chemoprevention [...] Read more.
Skin cancer is a prevalent type of cancer worldwide and has a high growth rate compared to other diseases. Although modern targeted therapies have improved the management of cutaneous neoplasms, there is an urgent requirement for a safer, more affordable, and effective chemoprevention and treatment strategy for skin cancer. Nutraceuticals, which are natural substances derived from food, have emerged as a potential alternative or adjunctive treatment option. In this review, we explore the current evidence on the use of omega-3 fatty acids and polyphenols (curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, apigenin, resveratrol, and genistein) for the treatment of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), as well as in their prevention. We discuss the mechanisms of action of the aforementioned nutraceuticals and their probable therapeutic benefits in skin cancer. Omega-3 fatty acids, curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, apigenin, resveratrol, and genistein have several properties, among which are anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor, which can help to prevent and treat skin cancer. However, their effectiveness is limited due to poor bioavailability. Nanoparticles and other delivery systems can improve their absorption and targeting. More research is needed to evaluate their safety and effectiveness as a natural approach to skin cancer prevention and treatment. These compounds should not replace conventional cancer treatments, but may be used as complementary therapy under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop