Food By-Products as Potential Sources of Natural Antioxidants: Latest Research Findings

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural and Synthetic Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 3774

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food chemistry has a strong multidisciplinary value that allows it to span from the elucidation of the chemical composition and nutritional properties of natural and processed foods to the study of dietary supplements and functional foods, the reclamation and valorization of food waste, the investigation of toxicological and contamination issues in food, and the development of highly innovative food analytical techniques, also applied to quality control procedures. As a consequence, food chemistry requires diverse but complementary skills and competencies, and often brings together experts from different disciplines, with positive implications for congruent issues, such as human nutrition and well-being and environmental health.

In recent decades, the growing knowledge of the beneficial effects of foods containing molecules with antioxidant function, combined with the assumption that a number of common synthetic antioxidants may have harmful effects for the consumer, has led the food chemistry community to strengthen research in the field of natural antioxidants. Natural antioxidants are not only able to scavenge free radicals, but can also inactivate metal catalysts by chelation, reducing hydroperoxides into stable hydroxyl derivatives, and interacting synergistically with other reducing compounds. Therefore, they are generally multifunctional in both food and biological systems, as they help the food matrix to prevent its quality deterioration, while keeping its nutritional value, and, at the same time, they support consumer health by discouraging these oxidative stress phenomena, which are involved in cancer, arteriosclerosis, autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as aging processes.

Notorious sources of natural antioxidants are vegetables, fruits, herbs, medicinal plants and spices. Additionally, a wide variety of agricultural residues and food by-products have recently been demonstrated to be potential sources of natural antioxidants. In this case, however, they often present disadvantaging organoleptic profiles, scarce consumer acceptance, and require safety testing.

Within this context, the main lines of research that could be addressed in this multidisciplinary Special Issue are:

  • The elucidation and characterization of antioxidant molecules in (novel) plant foods;
  • The reclamation and valorization of agrifood waste with valuable antioxidant potential;
  • The development of appropriate protocols—in terms of solvent extraction, isolation procedures, purity of active compounds—to obtain functional plant extracts or even isolated natural compounds with valuable antioxidant activity;
  • The safety testing and development of protocols to reliably evaluate the activity of natural antioxidants.

We are delighted to invite you to contribute your latest research findings in this Special Issue, with the hope of emphasizing the potential for multidisciplinary approaches to the complex set of challenges observed in the study of natural antioxidants.

Dr. Nicola Cicero
Prof. Dr. Giuseppa Di Bella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antioxidant foods
  • functional foods
  • biological activity
  • bioactive compounds
  • natural products
  • polyphenols

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 2888 KiB  
Article
Chickpea Seed Flours Improve the Nutritional and the Antioxidant Profiles of Traditional Shortbread Biscuits: Effects of In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion
by Cristina Delgado-Andrade, Raquel Olías, Mari Carmen Marín-Manzano, Isabel Seiquer and Alfonso Clemente
Antioxidants 2024, 13(1), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13010118 - 17 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Functional gluten-free biscuits enriched with commercial and landrace non-commercial chickpea flours were designed and compared with a traditional shortbread biscuit. They were analyzed in sensory attributes, amino acid profile, and antioxidant properties. Subsequently, the biscuits were digested in vitro to evaluate protein hydrolysis, [...] Read more.
Functional gluten-free biscuits enriched with commercial and landrace non-commercial chickpea flours were designed and compared with a traditional shortbread biscuit. They were analyzed in sensory attributes, amino acid profile, and antioxidant properties. Subsequently, the biscuits were digested in vitro to evaluate protein hydrolysis, amino acid bioaccessibility, phenolic compounds release, and antioxidant markers. The presence of chickpea flours provided golden color and heightened biscuit hardness and fracturability (especially in non-commercial), increasing crispness and reducing brittleness. The protein hydrolysis was similar among samples (≈15%), except for one of the non-commercial (≈20%). Amino acids such as arginine, phenylalanine, leucine, tyrosine, and lysine exhibited the highest bioaccessibilities. Incorporating chickpea flour improved the antioxidant activity and polyphenol content in undigested samples and bioaccesible fractions, with higher levels of p-coumaric and ferulic acids after digestion, regardless of the chickpea seed. Non-commercial flours increased the presence of resveratrol and/or catechin in the bioaccessible fraction. Antioxidant action assessed in the Caco-2 cell line showed that the protective effect against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation did not always correlate with the in vitro antioxidant capacity. Our data support that the inclusion of chickpea flours in the formulation of functional biscuits provides the consumer with products of added nutritional value with attractive organoleptic features. Full article
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22 pages, 1118 KiB  
Review
Effect of Diet and Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of Lymphoproliferative Disorders
by Gabriella Cancemi, Nicola Cicero, Alessandro Allegra and Sebastiano Gangemi
Antioxidants 2023, 12(9), 1674; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12091674 - 26 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2048
Abstract
Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of pathologies that result from clonal proliferation of lymphocytes. They are classified into Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the latter develops as a result of B, T, or NK cells undergoing malignant transformation. It is believed that diet [...] Read more.
Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of pathologies that result from clonal proliferation of lymphocytes. They are classified into Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the latter develops as a result of B, T, or NK cells undergoing malignant transformation. It is believed that diet can modulate cellular redox state and that oxidative stress is implicated in lymphomagenesis by acting on several biological mechanisms; in fact, oxidative stress can generate a state of chronic inflammation through the activation of various transcription factors, thereby increasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and causing overstimulation of B lymphocytes in the production of antibodies and possible alterations in cellular DNA. The purpose of our work is to investigate the results of in vitro and in vivo studies on the possible interaction between lymphomas, oxidative stress, and diet. A variety of dietary regimens and substances introduced with the diet that may have antioxidant and antiproliferative effects were assessed. The possibility of using nutraceuticals as novel anticancer agents is discussed; although the use of natural substances in lymphoma therapy is an interesting field of study, further studies are needed to define the efficacy of different nutraceuticals before introducing them into clinical practice. Full article
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