Impact of Emerging Technologies on Food Microorganisms: Growth, Conservation, and Extraction of Valuable Compounds

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2020) | Viewed by 6125

Special Issue Editor

Laboratoire Transformations Intégrées de la Matière Renouvelable (UTC/ESCOM, EA 4297 TIMR), Ecole Supérieure de Chimie Organique et Minérale, 1 Allée du réseau Jean-Marie Buckmaster, 60200 Compiègne, France
Interests: fermentation; emerging processing technologies; valorization of by-products and agro-industrial waste bioprocess; antioxidant bioactive compounds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past decade, the application of emerging technologies (e.g., pulsed electric field (PEF), high-voltage electrical discharge (HVED), ultrasound (USN), high-pressure processing (HPP), microwave (MW), ultraviolet (UV), etc.) has been extensively applied to microorganisms for several purposes. These applications include stimulation (i.e. stress), preservation, and inactivation towards the extraction of valuable compounds, among others (e.g., drying, freezing, etc.). Depending on the intensity of the application of these technologies (e.g., intensity of PEF, USN, etc.), the impact on microorganisms will be different. For example, it has been reported that either low-intensity PEF/USN or low-pressure treatment led to a stimulation of microorganism growth, and many effects, including shortening the fermentation time, accelerating the substrate consumption, and increasing the microbial biomass have been reported. However, information about the mechanisms of microbial stimulation remains unclear and insufficiently studied. Increasing the energy of application of emerging technologies involves further stress to microorganisms, and has led to a decrease in the fermentation kinetics during fermentation, and then to microbial inactivation. Many applications have been associated with microbial inactivation using emerging technologies. Some of these have already been industrialized (e.g., PEF and HPP), while others have been successfully applied at laboratory scale (e.g., HVED). Therefore, more research studies are required to further investigate the impact of emerging technologies on microorganisms.

In view of the above potential and developments, the journal Foods is inviting authors to submit unpublished original contributions, critical review articles, and short communications for consideration in the Special Issue “Impact of Emerging Technologies on Microorganisms: Growth, Conservation, and Extraction of Valuable Compounds”. Topics covered in this Special Issue include but are not limited to:

  • Enhancing food fermentation processes by microbial stimulation;
  • Developing new fermented products assisted by innovative processing;
  • Extracting valuable microbial compounds using emerging technologies;
  • Studying the impact of emerging technologies on the conservation of microorganisms;

Scaling-up and implementation of innovative food fermentation processes.


Prof. Mohamed Koubaa
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fermentation
  • microbial stimulation
  • emerging technologies
  • valuable compounds recovery
  • microbial conservation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 3700 KiB  
Article
Effect of Pulsed Electric Fields on the Growth and Acidification Kinetics of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1146; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091146 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2533
Abstract
The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the growth and acidification kinetics of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1 during fermentation. The PEF treatments were applied during the fermentation process using a recirculation pump and [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the growth and acidification kinetics of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1 during fermentation. The PEF treatments were applied during the fermentation process using a recirculation pump and a PEF treatment chamber coupled with a PEF generator. The medium flow rate through the chamber was first optimized to obtain the same growth and acidification kinetics than the control fermentation without medium recirculation. Different PEF intensities (60–428 V cm−1) were then applied to the culture medium to study the impact of PEF on the cells’ behavior. The growth and acidification kinetics were recorded during the fermentation and the specific growth rates µ, pH, and acidification rate (dpH/dt) were assessed. The results obtained showed a biphasic growth by applying high PEF intensities (beyond 285 V cm−1) with the presence of two maximal specific growth rates and a decrease in the acidification activities. It was demonstrated that the cells were stressed during the PEF treatment, but presented an accelerated growth after stopping it, leading thereby to similar absorbance and pH at the end of the fermentation. These results show the great potential of PEF technology to be applied to generate low acidified products by performing PEF-assisted fermentations. Full article
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13 pages, 1738 KiB  
Article
The Combined Effect of Pressure and Temperature on Kefir Production—A Case Study of Food Fermentation in Unconventional Conditions
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081133 - 18 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3179
Abstract
Food fermentation under pressure has been studied in recent years as a way to produce foods with novel properties. The purpose of this work was to study kefir production under pressure (7–50 MPa) at different temperatures (17–32 °C), as a case study of [...] Read more.
Food fermentation under pressure has been studied in recent years as a way to produce foods with novel properties. The purpose of this work was to study kefir production under pressure (7–50 MPa) at different temperatures (17–32 °C), as a case study of unconventional food fermentation. The fermentation time to produce kefir was similar at all temperatures (17, 25, and 32 °C) up to 15 MPa, compared to atmospheric pressure. At 50 MPa, the fermentation rate was slower, but the difference was reduced as temperature increased. During fermentation, lactic and acetic acid concentration increased while citric acid decreased. The positive activation volumes (Va) obtained indicate that pressure decreased the fermentation rate, while the temperature rise led to the attenuation of the pressure effect (lower Va). On the other hand, higher activation energies (Ea) were observed with pressure increase, indicating that fermentation became more sensitive to temperature. The condition that resulted in a faster fermentation, higher titratable acidity, and higher concentration of lactic acid was 15 MPa/32 °C. As the authors are aware, this is the second work in the literature to study the combined effect of pressure and temperature on a fermentative process. Full article
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