Impact of Emerging Technologies on Food Products Composition

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2019) | Viewed by 17651

Special Issue Editors

Laboratoire Transformations Intégrées de la Matière Renouvelable (UTC/ESCOM, EA 4297 TIMR), Ecole Supérieure de Chimie Organique et Minérale, 1 Allée du réseau Jean-Marie Buckmaster, 60200 Compiègne, France
Interests: fermentation; emerging processing technologies; valorization of by-products and agro-industrial waste bioprocess; antioxidant bioactive compounds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of emerging technologies for food and by-product processing has been widely studied in the last few decades. Among these technologies, pulsed electric fields, high-pressure processing, high voltage electrical discharges, ohmic heating, ultrasounds, microwaves, pulsed light, and cold plasma, are the most studied. They can be used as alternatives for food preservation technologies (inactivation of microorganisms), and for the intensification of the extraction of added value compounds from microbial and plant matrices. However, although the numerous advantages of these technologies over conventional ones, information about their impact on food quality and composition remains scarce and need further investigations.

In view of this research need, Foods is inviting authors to submit unpublished original contributions, critical review articles and short communications for consideration in the Special Issue “Impact of Emerging Technologies on Food Product Composition”.

Dr. Mohamed Koubaa
Dr. Nabil Grimi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emerging technologies
  • food quality
  • food composition
  • nutritional value

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 433 KiB  
Article
Effects of Light-Emitting Diodes on the Accumulation of Glucosinolates and Phenolic Compounds in Sprouting Canola (Brassica napus L.)
Foods 2019, 8(2), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8020076 - 19 Feb 2019
Cited by 52 | Viewed by 5512
Abstract
In this study, we investigated optimal light conditions for enhancement of the growth and accumulation of glucosinolates and phenolics in the sprouts of canola (Brassica napus L.). We found that the shoot lengths and fresh weights of red light-irradiated sprouts were higher [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated optimal light conditions for enhancement of the growth and accumulation of glucosinolates and phenolics in the sprouts of canola (Brassica napus L.). We found that the shoot lengths and fresh weights of red light-irradiated sprouts were higher than those of sprouts exposed to white, blue, and blue + red light, whereas root length was not notably different among red, blue, white, and blue + red light treatments. The accumulations of total glucosinolates in plants irradiated with white, blue, and red lights were not significantly different (19.32 ± 0.13, 20.69 ± 0.05, and 20.65 ± 1.70 mg/g dry weight (wt.), respectively). However, sprouts exposed to blue + red light contained the lowest levels of total glucosinolates (17.08 ± 0.28 mg/g dry wt.). The accumulation of total phenolic compounds was the highest in plants irradiated with blue light (3.81 ± 0.08 mg/g dry wt.), 1.33 times higher than the lowest level in plants irradiated with red light (2.87 ± 0.05 mg/g dry wt.). These results demonstrate that red light-emitting diode (LED) light is suitable for sprout growth and that blue LED light is effective in increasing the accumulation of glucosinolates and phenolics in B. napus sprouts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Emerging Technologies on Food Products Composition)
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10 pages, 2199 KiB  
Article
Improvements on the Stability and Vitamin Content of Acerola Juice Obtained by Ultrasonic Processing
Foods 2018, 7(5), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7050068 - 01 May 2018
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5444
Abstract
This work has examined the influence of ultrasonic processing on acerola juice and its influence in the stability of the juice and in the availability of vitamins B, C, E, and pro-vitamin A. The study has evaluated the changes in these quality parameters [...] Read more.
This work has examined the influence of ultrasonic processing on acerola juice and its influence in the stability of the juice and in the availability of vitamins B, C, E, and pro-vitamin A. The study has evaluated the changes in these quality parameters resulting from changes on ultrasonic power density, processing time and temperature. Ultrasound application increased the availability of pro-vitamin A and vitamins B3, B5, C and E in the juice by releasing them from the apoenzymes to which they are bound and by improving the homogeneity of the juice. The retention of the major vitamins in acerola juice (vitamins A and C) was higher when lower temperatures (10 to 20 °C) and mild ultrasound power density (2000 to 3000 W/L) were applied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Emerging Technologies on Food Products Composition)
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Review

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14 pages, 3523 KiB  
Review
Pilot Scale Cavitational Reactors and Other Enabling Technologies to Design the Industrial Recovery of Polyphenols from Agro-Food By-Products, a Technical and Economical Overview
Foods 2018, 7(9), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7090130 - 21 Aug 2018
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 6043
Abstract
We herein provide an overview of the most recent multidisciplinary process advances that have occurred in the food industry as a result of changes in consumer lifestyle and expectations. The demand for fresher and more natural foods is driving the development of new [...] Read more.
We herein provide an overview of the most recent multidisciplinary process advances that have occurred in the food industry as a result of changes in consumer lifestyle and expectations. The demand for fresher and more natural foods is driving the development of new technologies that may efficiently operate at room temperature. Moreover, the huge amount of material discarded by the agro-food production chain lays down a significant challenge for emerging technologies that can provide new opportunities by recovering valuable by-products and creating new applications. Aiming to design industrial processes, there is a need for pilot scale plants such as the ‘green technologies development platform’, which was established by the authors. The platform is made up of a series of multifunctional laboratories that are equipped with non-conventional pilot reactors, developed in direct collaboration with partner companies, in order to bridge the enormous gap between academia and industry via the large-scale exploitation of relevant research achievements. Selected key, enabling technologies for process intensification make this scale-up feasible. We make use of two selected examples, the grape and olive production chains, to show how cavitational reactors, which are based on high-intensity ultrasound and rotational hydrodynamic units, can assist food processing and the sustainable recovery of waste, to produce valuable nutraceuticals as well as colouring and food–beverage additives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Emerging Technologies on Food Products Composition)
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