Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Foods of Marine Origin".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2024) | Viewed by 10343

Special Issue Editor

School of Food Science and Technology, Dalian Polytechnic University, No. 1, Qinggongyuan, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116034, China
Interests: active substance delivery; food preservation; food packaging
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aquatic products are not only beneficial in that they offer essential calories to the human body, but they also have a unique taste and multiple nutrients such as protein, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, active polysaccharides, and so on. With the advancement of equipment and technology, aquatic product processing methods have also fundamentally been developed. However, compared to other muscle products, aquatic products possess more free amino acids, unsaturated fatty acid, fewer connective tissues, and higher enzyme activities. As a consequence, aquatic products are prone to quality degradation during processing, such as protein degradation, lipid oxidation, and changes in the smell, taste, and texture. These need to be studied more in depth.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) traditional processing (such as heating, salting, drying, smoking, natural fermentation), modern processing (such as ultra-high-pressure processing, low‐salt fermentation, rapid freezing-thawing, etc.), byproduct processing, and the quality change mechanisms during the processing of aquatic products.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Jingran Bi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aquatic food products
  • processing method
  • quality control
  • byproduct utilization
  • food safety

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

27 pages, 4855 KiB  
Article
Evaluating Microbiological Safety, Sensory Quality, and Packaging for Online Market Success of Roasted Pickled Fish Powder
by Aunchalee Aussanasuwannakul and Pisut Butsuwan
Foods 2024, 13(6), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060861 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 705
Abstract
This study explores the pivotal roles of microbiological safety, sensory qualities, packaging efficiency, and consumer preferences in determining the success of roasted pickled fish powder (RPFP) variants in the online marketplace. The comparison of the nutritional composition of the developed RPFP variants with [...] Read more.
This study explores the pivotal roles of microbiological safety, sensory qualities, packaging efficiency, and consumer preferences in determining the success of roasted pickled fish powder (RPFP) variants in the online marketplace. The comparison of the nutritional composition of the developed RPFP variants with a commercial benchmark reveals significant differences: the protein content in the herbal flavor variant is found to be 28.97%, which is lower than the 40.17% found in the commercial benchmark, while the fat content in the spicy flavor variant is measured at 19.51%, exceeding the 10.60% present in the benchmark. Additionally, the herbal flavor boasts a superior dietary fiber content of 14.23%, highlighting the intricate relationship between nutritional content and sensory attributes, which is critical in online retail, where physical product evaluation is not possible. Our comprehensive approach, evaluating both nutritional and sensory dimensions, introduces a novel perspective to the adaptation of traditional food products for e-commerce, addressing a gap in the literature. Despite this study’s limitations, including a focused market analysis and constrained sample size, our findings offer valuable insights into enhancing product quality and integrity in the digital marketplace, positioning RPFP for competitive success while suggesting directions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

16 pages, 2606 KiB  
Article
Transcriptome Reveals Regulation of Quorum Sensing of Hafnia alvei H4 on the Coculture System of Hafnia alvei H4 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC13525
by Yanan Wang, Xue Li, Gongliang Zhang, Jingran Bi and Hongman Hou
Foods 2024, 13(2), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020336 - 21 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 864
Abstract
In the food industry, foodborne spoilage bacteria often live in mixed species and attach to each other, leading to changes in spoilage characteristics. Quorum sensing (QS) has been reported to be a regulating mechanism for food spoiling by certain kinds of bacteria. Here, [...] Read more.
In the food industry, foodborne spoilage bacteria often live in mixed species and attach to each other, leading to changes in spoilage characteristics. Quorum sensing (QS) has been reported to be a regulating mechanism for food spoiling by certain kinds of bacteria. Here, the contents of biofilm, extracellular polysaccharides, and biogenic amines in the coculture system of Hafnia alvei H4 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC13525 were significantly reduced when the QS element of H. alvei H4 was deleted, confirming that QS of H. alvei H4 is involved in the dual-species interactions. Then, transcriptomics was used to explore the regulatory mechanism at the mRNA molecular level. The deletion of the QS element decreased the transcript levels of genes related to chemotaxis, flagellar assembly, and the two-component system pathway of H. alvei H4 in the coculture system. Furthermore, a total of 732 DEGs of P. fluorescens ATCC13525 were regulated in the dual species, which were primarily concerned with biofilm formation, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and amino acid metabolism. Taken together, the absence of the QS element of H. alvei H4 weakened the mutual cooperation of the two bacteria in the coculture system, making it a good target for managing infection with H. alvei and P. fluorescens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 7256 KiB  
Article
Line Laser Scanning Combined with Machine Learning for Fish Head Cutting Position Identification
by Xu Zhang, Ze Gong, Xinyu Liang, Weichen Sun, Junxiao Ma and Huihui Wang
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4518; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244518 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 926
Abstract
Fish head cutting is one of the most important processes during fish pre-processing. At present, the identification of cutting positions mainly depends on manual experience, which cannot meet the requirements of large-scale production lines. In this paper, a fast and contactless identification method [...] Read more.
Fish head cutting is one of the most important processes during fish pre-processing. At present, the identification of cutting positions mainly depends on manual experience, which cannot meet the requirements of large-scale production lines. In this paper, a fast and contactless identification method of cutting position was carried out by using a constructed line laser data acquisition system. The fish surface data were collected by a linear laser scanning sensor, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensions of the dorsal and abdominal boundary data. Based on the dimension data, Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVMs), Particle Swarm Optimization-Back Propagation (PSO-BP) networks, and Long and Short Term Memory (LSTM) neural networks were applied for fish head cutting position identification model establishment. According to the results, the LSTM model was considered to be the best prediction model with a determination coefficient (R2) value, root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and residual predictive deviation (RPD) of 0.9480, 0.2957, 0.1933, and 3.1426, respectively. This study demonstrated the reliability of combining line laser scanning techniques with machine learning using LSTM to identify the fish head cutting position accurately and quickly. It can provide a theoretical reference for the development of intelligent processing and intelligent cutting equipment for fish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 4012 KiB  
Article
The Preparation and Properties of Amino-Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Based Antibacterial Hydrogel Loaded with ε-Polylysine
by Yixi Li, Yulong Qiu, Hongman Hou, Gongliang Zhang, Hongshun Hao and Jingran Bi
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3807; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203807 - 17 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1135
Abstract
In this paper, amino-carboxymethyl chitosan (ACC) was prepared through amino carboxymethylation, which introduces -COOH and -NH2 groups to the chitosan (CS) chains. Meanwhile, dialdehyde starch (DAS) was produced by oxidizing corn starch using sodium periodate. To attain the optimal loading and long-time [...] Read more.
In this paper, amino-carboxymethyl chitosan (ACC) was prepared through amino carboxymethylation, which introduces -COOH and -NH2 groups to the chitosan (CS) chains. Meanwhile, dialdehyde starch (DAS) was produced by oxidizing corn starch using sodium periodate. To attain the optimal loading and long-time release of ε-polylysine (ε-PL), the ACC/DAS hydrogels were synthesized through the Schiff base reaction between the amino group on ACC and the aldehyde group in DAS. The molecular structure, microcosmic properties, loading capacity, and bacteriostatic properties of the four types of hydrogels containing different mass concentrations of ACC were investigated. The results showed that the dynamic imine bond C=N existed in the ACC/DAS hydrogels, which proved that the hydrogels were formed by the cross-linking of the Schiff base reaction. With the increasing mass concentration of the ACC, the cross-sectional morphology of the hydrogel became smoother, the thermal stability increased, and the swelling behavior was gradually enhanced. The tight network structure improved the ε-PL loading efficiency, with the highest value of 99.2%. Moreover, the loading of ε-PL gave the hydrogel good antibacterial properties. These results indicate that ACC/DAS hydrogel is potential in food preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 3794 KiB  
Article
Effects of a Novel Starter Culture on Quality Improvement and Putrescine, Cadaverine, and Histamine Inhibition of Fermented Shrimp Paste
by Xinyu Li, Yang Zhang, Xinxiu Ma, Gongliang Zhang and Hongman Hou
Foods 2023, 12(15), 2833; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12152833 - 26 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
Fermented shrimp paste is a popular food in Asian countries. However, biogenic amines (BAs) are a typically associated hazard commonly found during the fermentation of shrimp paste and pose a food-safety danger. In this work, an autochthonic salt-tolerant Tetragenococcus muriaticus TS (T. [...] Read more.
Fermented shrimp paste is a popular food in Asian countries. However, biogenic amines (BAs) are a typically associated hazard commonly found during the fermentation of shrimp paste and pose a food-safety danger. In this work, an autochthonic salt-tolerant Tetragenococcus muriaticus TS (T. muriaticus TS) strain was used as a starter culture for grasshopper sub shrimp paste fermentation. It was found that with the starter culture, putrescine, cadaverine, and histamine concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.05) with a maximal reduction of 19.20%, 14.01%, and 28.62%, respectively. According to high-throughput sequencing data, T. muriaticus TS could change the interactions between species and reduce the abundance of bacterial genera positively associated with BAs, therefore inhibiting the BA accumulation during shrimp paste fermentation. Moreover, the volatile compounds during the fermentation process were also assessed by HS-SPME-GC-MS. With the starter added, the content of pyrazines increased, while the off-odor amines decreased. The odor of the shrimp paste was successfully improved. These results indicate that T. muriaticus TS can be used as an appropriate starter culture for improving the safety and quality of grasshopper sub shrimp paste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 4737 KiB  
Article
Combined Effects of Cold and Hot Air Drying on Physicochemical Properties of Semi-Dried Takifugu obscurus Fillets
by Ye Zhu, Xiaoting Chen, Kun Qiao, Bei Chen, Min Xu, Shuilin Cai, Wenzheng Shi and Zhiyu Liu
Foods 2023, 12(8), 1649; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12081649 - 14 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1210
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of semi-dried Takifugu obscurus fillets in cold air drying (CAD), hot air drying (HAD), and cold and hot air combined drying (CHACD) were analyzed based on pH, water state, lipid oxidation, protein degradation, and microstructure, using a texture analyzer, low-field [...] Read more.
The physicochemical properties of semi-dried Takifugu obscurus fillets in cold air drying (CAD), hot air drying (HAD), and cold and hot air combined drying (CHACD) were analyzed based on pH, water state, lipid oxidation, protein degradation, and microstructure, using a texture analyzer, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance, thiobarbituric acid, frozen sections, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and differential scanning calorimetry. Water binding to the samples was enhanced by all three drying methods, and the immobilized water content of CHACD was between that of HAD and CAD. The pH of the semi-dried fillets was improved by CHACD. When compared to HAD and CAD, CHACD improved the springiness and chewiness of the fillets, especially cold air drying for 90 min (CAD-90), with values of 0.97 and 59.79 g, respectively. The muscle fibers were arranged compactly and clearly in CAD-90, having higher muscle toughness. CHACD reduced the drying time and degree of lipid oxidation compared to HAD and CAD. CAD better preserved protein composition, whereas HAD and CHACD promoted actin production; CHACD had a higher protein denaturation temperature (74.08–74.57 °C). CHACD results in better physicochemical properties than HAD or CAD, including shortened drying time, reduced lipid oxidation, enhanced protein stability, and denser tissue structure. These results provide a theoretical basis for selecting the appropriate drying method for T. obscurus in industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3912 KiB  
Article
Effects of Modified Atmosphere Packaging with Varied CO2 and O2 Concentrations on the Texture, Protein, and Odor Characteristics of Salmon during Cold Storage
by Yun-Fang Qian, Cheng-Cheng Liu, Jing-Jing Zhang, Per Ertbjerg and Sheng-Ping Yang
Foods 2022, 11(22), 3560; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223560 - 09 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2134
Abstract
The effect of gas ratio on the growth of bacteria has been well demonstrated, but some adverse effects of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on seafoods have also been found. To provide a better understanding of the effects of CO2 and O2 [...] Read more.
The effect of gas ratio on the growth of bacteria has been well demonstrated, but some adverse effects of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on seafoods have also been found. To provide a better understanding of the effects of CO2 and O2 concentrations (CO2 from 40% to 100% and O2 from 0% to 30%) in MAP on the texture and protein contents and odor characteristics of salmon during cold storage, the physiochemical, microbial, and odor indicators were compared with those without treatment (CK). Generally, MAP treatments hindered the increase of microbial counts, total volatile basic nitrogen, and TCA-soluble peptides, and decreased the water-holding capacity, hardness, springiness, and sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein contents. The results also indicated that 60%CO2/10%O2/30%N2 was optimal and decreased the total mesophilic bacterial counts by 2.8 log cfu/g in comparison with CK on day 12. In agreement, the concentration of CO2 of 60% showed the lowest myofibrillar protein degradation, and less subsequent loss of hardness. The electronic nose characteristics analysis indicated that 60%CO2/20%O2/20%N2 and 60%CO2/10%O2/30%N2 had the best effect to maintain the original odor profiles of salmon. The correlation analysis demonstrated that microbial growth had a strong relationship with myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein content. It can be concluded that 60%CO2/10%O2/30%N2 displayed the best effect to achieve the goal of preventing protein degradation and odor changes in salmon fillets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1095 KiB  
Article
Changes in Protein Degradation and Non-Volatile Flavor Substances of Swimming Crab (Portunus trituberculatus) during Steaming
by Qin Chen, Yurui Zhang, Lunan Jing, Naiyong Xiao, Xugan Wu and Wenzheng Shi
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3502; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213502 - 03 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1690
Abstract
To investigate the effect of steaming time (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min) on the protein degradation and non-volatile flavor substances of swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus), the moisture content, total nitrogen (TN), non-protein nitrogen (NPN), free amino acids (FAAs), [...] Read more.
To investigate the effect of steaming time (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min) on the protein degradation and non-volatile flavor substances of swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus), the moisture content, total nitrogen (TN), non-protein nitrogen (NPN), free amino acids (FAAs), flavor nucleotides, electronic tongue analysis, and sensory evaluation were determined. The results showed that the contents of NPN and total FAAs were the highest after crabs steamed for 10 min. Meanwhile, the AMP (adenosine monophosphate) content reached the maximum value (332.83 mg/100 g) and the taste active value (TAV) reached 6.67, which indicated that AMP contributes the most to the taste of steamed crab at 10 min. The electronic tongue distinguished the taste difference well, and the sensory score was the highest at 15 min. Combined with equivalent umami concentration (EUC) and TAV value, swimming crab (weight = 200 ± 20 g) steamed for 10–15 min tasted best. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aquatic Food Products Processing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop