Nanomaterial-Based Emerging Technologies for Detecting Food Contaminants—Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2024 | Viewed by 2352

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Food Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457, China
Interests: food science; food nutrition and safety; pesticide and veterinary drug testing; food harmful substances analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Trace contaminants in food, such as pesticide and veterinary drug residues, illegal additives, and heavy metals, cause foodborne illnesses and pose a serious threat to people's health. To ensure food safety, accurate, sensitive, and effective analysis strategies are necessary. In recent years, metal-based (gold nanoparticles, gold nanorods, silver nanoparticles, etc.) and carbon-based (carbon nanotubes, carbon quantum dots, etc.) nanomaterials have been applied in various analysis strategies to improve food safety. There has been remarkable progress in the purification of complex food matrices, new signal analysis, and the performance of existing methods. These emerging nanomaterial-based technologies have fully exploited the advantages of nanomaterials, improving the accuracy, sensitivity, time consumption, and convenience of food safety detection to varying degrees. This Special Issue aims to publish the most recent research findings regarding emerging technologies in food safety detection based on various types of nanomaterials, to promote the further development of related techniques in food safety analysis.

This Special Issue will collect publications on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Metal-based nanomaterials;
  • Carbon-based nanomaterials;
  • Metal–organic/covalent organic framework materials;
  • Organic fluorescent/luminescent materials;
  • Electrochemical sensing technology;
  • Chemical/biological sensors;
  • Immunosensors;
  • Food analysis.

Dr. Mingfei Pan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • organic fluorescent/luminescent materials
  • electrochemical sensing technology
  • biosensors
  • food contaminants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 5989 KiB  
Article
Core-Shell-Shell Upconversion Nanomaterials Applying for Simultaneous Immunofluorescent Detection of Fenpropathrin and Procymidone
by Yang Song, Jingyi Jin, Liuling Hu, Bingqian Hu, Mengyao Wang, Lilong Guo and Xiyan Lv
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3445; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183445 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 926
Abstract
This study synthesized the NaGdF4@NaGdF4: Yb, Tm@NaGdF4: Yb, Nd upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), combined with another three-layer structure NaYF4@NaYF4: Yb, Er@NaYF4 UCNPs, with a core-shell-shell structure, effectively suppressing fluorescence quenching and significantly improving [...] Read more.
This study synthesized the NaGdF4@NaGdF4: Yb, Tm@NaGdF4: Yb, Nd upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), combined with another three-layer structure NaYF4@NaYF4: Yb, Er@NaYF4 UCNPs, with a core-shell-shell structure, effectively suppressing fluorescence quenching and significantly improving upconversion luminescence efficiency. Two types of modified UCNPs were coupled with antibodies against fenpropathrin and procymidone to form signal probes, and magnetic nanoparticles were coupled with antigens of fenpropathrin and procymidone to form capture probes. A rapid and sensitive fluorescence immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of fenpropathrin and procymidone was established based on the principle of specific binding of antigen and antibody and magnetic separation technology. Under the optimal competitive reaction conditions, different concentrations of fenpropathrin and procymidone standards were added to collect the capture probe-signal probe complex. The fluorescence values at 542 nm and 802 nm were measured using 980 nm excitation luminescence. The results showed that the detection limits of fenpropathrin and procymidone were 0.114 µg/kg and 0.082 µg/kg, respectively, with sensitivities of 8.15 µg/kg and 7.98 µg/kg, and they were applied to the detection of fenpropathrin and procymidone in tomatoes, cucumbers, and cabbage. The average recovery rates were 86.5~100.2% and 85.61~102.43%, respectively, with coefficients of variation less than 10%. The results showed good consistency with the detection results of high-performance liquid chromatography, proving that this method has good accuracy and is suitable for the rapid detection of fenpropathrin and procymidone in food. Full article
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32 pages, 2598 KiB  
Review
Nanoscale Materials Applying for the Detection of Mycotoxins in Foods
by Xiaochun Hu, Huilin Li, Jingying Yang, Xintao Wen, Shuo Wang and Mingfei Pan
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3448; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183448 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1142
Abstract
Trace amounts of mycotoxins in food matrices have caused a very serious problem of food safety and have attracted widespread attention. Developing accurate, sensitive, rapid mycotoxin detection and control strategies adapted to the complex matrices of food is crucial for in safeguarding public [...] Read more.
Trace amounts of mycotoxins in food matrices have caused a very serious problem of food safety and have attracted widespread attention. Developing accurate, sensitive, rapid mycotoxin detection and control strategies adapted to the complex matrices of food is crucial for in safeguarding public health. With the continuous development of nanotechnology and materials science, various nanoscale materials have been developed for the purification of complex food matrices or for providing response signals to achieve the accurate and rapid detection of various mycotoxins in food products. This article reviews and summarizes recent research (from 2018 to 2023) on new strategies and methods for the accurate or rapid detection of mold toxins in food samples using nanoscale materials. It places particular emphasis on outlining the characteristics of various nanoscale or nanostructural materials and their roles in the process of detecting mycotoxins. The aim of this paper is to promote the in-depth research and application of various nanoscale or structured materials and to provide guidance and reference for the development of strategies for the detection and control of mycotoxin contamination in complex matrices of food. Full article
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