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Energy Efficiency and Shadow Pricing

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "C: Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 5323

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Department of Food and Resource Economics (IFRO), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: applied microeconomics; efficiency analysis and benchmarking; allocation rules; health economics; network economics; cooperative game theory
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute of Economics and Rural Development, Lithuanian Centre for Social Sciences, 03220 Vilnius, Lithuania
Interests: sustainable development; integrated analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The objectives of climate change mitigation and resource efficiency imply the need for energy efficiency gains. Furthermore, energy-related GHG emission needs to be monitored and curbed. The use of energy and the resulting environmental impacts are also related to economic growth and the use of production factors. This complex framework can be analyzed by modelling (environmental) production technology. This gives rise to measures of efficiency and productivity change. Parametric and nonparametric models can be used for gauging efficiency and productivity change. Shadow prices are an important measure of pollution abatement. All in all, efficiency analysis renders multiple data-driven indicators for the assessment of the sustainability of economies.

This Special Issue calls for theoretical and empirical papers focusing on the following topics:

  • Energy efficiency;
  • Total factor productivity;
  • Environmental performance indicators;
  • Energy planning;
  • Pinch analysis;
  • Data envelopment analysis;
  • Stochastic frontier analysis;
  • Shadow pricing;
  • Emission allocation.

Prof. Dr. Tomas Baležentis
Prof. Dr. Jens Leth Hougaard
Prof. Dr. Dalia Štreimikienė
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy efficiency
  • shadow prices
  • data envelopment analysis
  • stochastic frontier analysis
  • energy intensity
  • emission intensity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 3676 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Relationship between Residential CO2 Emissions, Urbanization, Economic Growth, and Residential Energy Consumption: Evidence from the North Africa Region
by Charifa Haouraji, Badia Mounir, Ilham Mounir and Abdelmajid Farchi
Energies 2021, 14(18), 5849; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185849 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1958
Abstract
Rapid urbanization, coupled with income growth, will inevitably cause the residential energy consumption in the North Africa region to continue to increase, with adverse effects on the climate, human health, and the economy. In these regards, this paper explores the relationship between residential [...] Read more.
Rapid urbanization, coupled with income growth, will inevitably cause the residential energy consumption in the North Africa region to continue to increase, with adverse effects on the climate, human health, and the economy. In these regards, this paper explores the relationship between residential carbon dioxide emissions (RCO2), urbanization, economic growth, and residential energy use in four North African countries (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Egypt) over the period 1990–2016. To do this, we used the bounds cointegration and the Toda–Yamamoto Granger causality test. The existence of cointegration relationships was confirmed for the four countries. In the long run, the environment Kuznets curve relationship between increased income per capita and RCO2 emissions was verified for only Morocco and Tunisia. The causality analysis also reveals a combination of neutral, unidirectional, and bidirectional relationships for all countries. The RCO2 emissions have not proved to be a limiting factor in any country’s economic growth. The findings of this study certainly contribute to advancing the existing literature by emphasizing the income–pollution nexus in African countries. Policy makers and government regulators should implement the necessary policies that accelerate the development of renewable technologies to drive sustainable cooling and heating as well as water management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficiency and Shadow Pricing)
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16 pages, 597 KiB  
Article
Willingness to Pay for Renovation of Multi-Flat Buildings and to Share the Costs of Renovation
by Dalia Streimikiene and Tomas Balezentis
Energies 2020, 13(11), 2721; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13112721 - 28 May 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2454
Abstract
The paper deals with the problems linked to the energy renovation of multi-apartment buildings and developed a case study in Lithuania with the aim to assess the household’s willingness to pay for energy renovation and to define the main barriers preventing the households [...] Read more.
The paper deals with the problems linked to the energy renovation of multi-apartment buildings and developed a case study in Lithuania with the aim to assess the household’s willingness to pay for energy renovation and to define the main barriers preventing the households from making decisions to renovate their apartments in residential buildings. Energy renovation provides huge energy savings and greenhouse gas emissions reduction potential and though policies and measures exist to promote large scale energy renovation, there are still many barriers and the pace of energy renovation is still very slow, especially in new EU member states and former Soviet Union members. These countries have inherited old, energy inefficient residential buildings from their Soviet past, and their inhabitants are locked in energy poverty because of their inability to renovate their apartments. This paper analyzed the current situation in the selected country and presents the results of a case study on willingness to pay (WTP) for energy renovation in Lithuanian residential buildings. The survey of 104 Lithuanian households living in unrenovated multi-flat buildings was conducted. The 39 multiple choice questions were asked in order to define the main barriers and drivers of energy renovation. The main results of this pilot study indicated that there are several important organizational and economic barriers for energy renovation in multi-flat buildings and current policies and support schemes have not addressed them in a proper way. The high heating bills and low heat comfort in apartments were the main drivers of energy renovation decision-making for households, however, inadequate state support, reluctance to take a loan due to low income, and inability to make collective decisions on renovation due to the lack of cooperation and housing association were the main barriers that prevented them from this step. New innovative schemes like the Energy Service Companies ESCO model with consolidated billing can be applied to address the identified barriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficiency and Shadow Pricing)
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