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Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 23000

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Lithuanian Energy Instiute, LT-44403 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: sustainable energy development; climate change mitigation in the energy sector; behavioral changes; assessment of willingness to pay
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Lithuanian Institute of Agrarian Economics, Vilnius University, 01113 Vilnius, Lithuania
Interests: sustainable development; sustainability assessment; efficiency and productivity; energy economics; assessment of willingness to pay
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of the issue is to analyze and discuss various important issues linked to energy consumption and environmental pollution and human health. The studies assessing the negative impact of fossil fuel burning in terms of external costs of energy generation are welcomed. The use of renewable energy sources provides a lot of external benefits linked to GHG emission and atmospheric pollution reduction; therefore, assessment of the positive impact on human health and environment inked to development of net zero emission economy and carbon-free energy systems is necessary. This would allow grasping the various advantages of reaching 100% share for renewables in final energy consumption and developing new policies promoting penetration of renewables. Studies analyzing the public acceptance of renewable energy technologies in relation to their health impacts can also provide an important contribution to the discussion of energy-use-related health impacts.

Prof. Dr. Dalia Streimikiene
Prof. Dr. Tomas Baležentis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy consumption
  • externals costs
  • atmospheric pollution
  • climate change
  • use of renewable energy sources
  • public acceptance of renewable energy technologies, public health

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 1201 KiB  
Article
Carbon Emissions in the SAARC Countries with Causal Effects of FDI, Economic Growth and Other Economic Factors: Evidence from Dynamic Simultaneous Equation Models
by Rashid Latief, Yusheng Kong, Sohail Ahmad Javeed and Usman Sattar
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4605; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094605 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2998
Abstract
South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) countries like other developing countries are the major destination for foreign investors. At the same time, these countries are facing different climate change challenges. This study aims to inspect the economic determinants of carbon emissions (CE) [...] Read more.
South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) countries like other developing countries are the major destination for foreign investors. At the same time, these countries are facing different climate change challenges. This study aims to inspect the economic determinants of carbon emissions (CE) and dynamic causal interaction of CE with foreign direct investment (FDI), economic growth (EG), and other economic factors using panel cointegration test, dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and vector error correction model (VECM) for the SAARC countries. To make the homogenous analysis, we examined the association among variables for the individual country and as a group for the period 1990 to 2016. The panel results of this study confirmed the presence of the unidirectional causal association of EG with CE. The panel results of other economic factors confirmed the causality of urban population (UP) and energy consumption (EC) with CE. Moreover, the panel results of domestic capital (DS) and inflation rate (INF) confirmed the causal association with EG. Finally, the panel results of DS revealed a causality with FDI. Based on the above results, some policy guidelines are proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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18 pages, 1623 KiB  
Article
Integrating Social Dimensions into Future Sustainable Energy Supply Networks
by Matevz Obrecht, Yigit Kazancoglu and Matjaz Denac
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176230 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2328
Abstract
Environmental protection and sustainable development have become an inevitable trend in many areas, including the energy industry. The development of energy supply networks is strongly correlated with the economics of energy sources as well as ecological and socio-political issues. However, the energy supply [...] Read more.
Environmental protection and sustainable development have become an inevitable trend in many areas, including the energy industry. The development of energy supply networks is strongly correlated with the economics of energy sources as well as ecological and socio-political issues. However, the energy supply network is often distant from the social perspective. This paper therefore combines examination of perceptions and awareness of general public (web-based questionnaire) and top energy experts (a Delphi survey) on the energy supply network and identifies their potential integration in energy supply decision making processes. The results showed that public should be better informed as well as integrated into designing energy supply network as the prosumers gain power and the energy suppliers will no longer dominate the market. Public actors are ready to shape sustainable energy supply and also willing to pay 5.8% more for a sustainable energy supply. The majority are prepared to invest in renewable energy supply network close to their place of residence. Another result is that the public is calling for a shift in priority towards more sustainable and socially friendlier energy supply rather than focusing mainly on the economic and technical perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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20 pages, 1370 KiB  
Article
Conceptualizing Pathways of Sustainable Development in the Union for the Mediterranean Countries with an Empirical Intersection of Energy Consumption and Economic Growth
by Rashid Latief, Yusheng Kong, Yuanyuan Peng and Sohail Ahmad Javeed
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5614; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155614 - 4 Aug 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3261
Abstract
The availability of sufficient and trustworthy energy services at the reasonable cost in a securely and environmentally friendly manner, and conventionality with economic and social development requirements, is an important factor of sustainable development (SD). Energy plays a significant role in eliminating poverty [...] Read more.
The availability of sufficient and trustworthy energy services at the reasonable cost in a securely and environmentally friendly manner, and conventionality with economic and social development requirements, is an important factor of sustainable development (SD). Energy plays a significant role in eliminating poverty and increasing living standards. However, most of the present energy forms of energy supply and consumption are unsustainable. This paper analyzes the association between economic growth (EG), energy consumption (EC), and sustainable development (SD) among other economic factors. The sample of 14 developed and developing member states of the Union for the Mediterranean (UFM) was selected. To deal with the endogeneity issue, the system- generalized method of moment (GMM) model was employed. Moreover, panel co-integration, Granger causality tests, and robustness tests were employed to examine the long-run and short-run causality among variables of interest. The results confirmed the short-run dynamic association from sustainable development (SD) to energy consumption (EC), and economic growth (EG) to sustainable development (SD). Moreover, the results validated the presence of long-run equilibrium association in the equations of EC and sustainable development (SD). The findings of this study will be supportive for the policymakers to formulate sustainable energy policies to stimulate the economic growth (EG) in the way of sustainable development (SD) in the UFM countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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22 pages, 2034 KiB  
Article
Evolution of External Health Costs of Electricity Generation in the Baltic States
by Jintao Lu, Chong Zhang, Licheng Ren, Mengshang Liang, Wadim Strielkowski and Justas Streimikis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5265; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155265 - 22 Jul 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2397
Abstract
Implementation of strict policies for mitigating climate change has a direct impact on public health as far as the external health costs of electricity generation can be reduced, thanks to the reduction of emission of typical pollutants by switching to cleaner low carbon [...] Read more.
Implementation of strict policies for mitigating climate change has a direct impact on public health as far as the external health costs of electricity generation can be reduced, thanks to the reduction of emission of typical pollutants by switching to cleaner low carbon fuels and achieving energy efficiency improvements. Renewables have lower external health costs due to the lower life cycle emission of typical air pollutants linked to electricity generation, such as SO2, NOx, particulate matter, NH3, or NMVOC (Non-methane volatile organic compounds), which all appear to have serious negative effects on human health. Our case study performed in the Baltic States analyzed the dynamics of external health costs in parallel with the dynamics of the main health indicators in these countries: life expectancy at birth, mortality rates, healthy life years, self-perceived health, and illness indicators. We employed the data for external health costs retrieved from the CASES database, as well as the health statistics data compiled from the EUROSTAT database. The time range of the study was 2010–2018 due to the availability of consistent health indicators for the EU Member States. Our results show that the decrease of external health costs had a positive impact on the increase of the self-perceived good health and reduction of long-standing illness as well as the decrease of infant death rate. Our conclusions might be useful for other countries as well as for understanding the additional benefits of climate change mitigation policies and tracking their positive health impacts. The cooperation initiatives on clean energy and climate change mitigation between countries like One Belt One Road initiative by the Chinese government can also yield additional benefits linked to the public health improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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21 pages, 820 KiB  
Article
Economic Effects of Renewable Energy Expansion Policy: Computable General Equilibrium Analysis for Korea
by Inha Oh, Wang-Jin Yoo and Kihwan Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4762; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134762 - 2 Jul 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3421
Abstract
This study examines the effects of renewable energy expansion policy on the Korean economy and industries using the computable general equilibrium model, which divides the power generation sector into detailed generation technologies and sources. The scenarios are set to observe the cases where [...] Read more.
This study examines the effects of renewable energy expansion policy on the Korean economy and industries using the computable general equilibrium model, which divides the power generation sector into detailed generation technologies and sources. The scenarios are set to observe the cases where the share of solar photovoltaic and wind power generation reaches 7%. The effects are examined according to differing circumstances, such as when greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are regulated, and the funding source for renewable expansion varies. The results show that renewable expansion policies have negative effects on GDP. However, the magnitude of the GDP decline becomes smaller when GHG emissions are regulated. The expansion of renewable energy induces the growth of upstream industries which supply components for renewable generation modules. Regarding employment, the renewable expansion policy can increase the demand for labor. However, the direction and the extent of the effect vary depending on the funding source. When overlapping regulations, such as the emission trading scheme and renewable energy expansion policies, exist in the power generation sector, the renewable energy expansion policy could provide incentives for GHG emission-intensive power sources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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15 pages, 8802 KiB  
Article
Evolution of SO2 and NOx Emissions from Several Large Combustion Plants in Europe during 2005–2015
by Daniel-Eduard Constantin, Corina Bocăneala, Mirela Voiculescu, Adrian Roşu, Alexis Merlaud, Michel Van Roozendael and Puiu Lucian Georgescu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3630; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103630 - 21 May 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3467
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to investigate the evolution of SO2 and NOx emissions of ten very large combustion plants (LCPs >500 MW) located in the European Union (EU) during 2005–2015. The evolution of NOx and SO2 emissions were analyzed [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to investigate the evolution of SO2 and NOx emissions of ten very large combustion plants (LCPs >500 MW) located in the European Union (EU) during 2005–2015. The evolution of NOx and SO2 emissions were analyzed against the EU Directives in force during 2005–2015. The investigation was performed using space-borne observations and estimated emissions collected from the EEA (European Environment Agency) inventory of air pollutant emissions. The power plants were chosen according to their capacity and emissions, located in various parts of Europe, to give an overall picture of atmospheric pollution with NOx and SO2 associated with the activity of very large LCPs in Europe. Satellite observations from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) are compared with calculated emissions in order to assess whether satellite observations can be used to monitor air quality, as a standard procedure, by governmental or nongovernmental institutions. Our results show that both space observations and estimated emissions of NOx and SO2 atmospheric content have a descending trend until 2010, complying with the EU Directives. The financial and economic crisis during 2007–2009 played an important role in reducing emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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Other

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12 pages, 345 KiB  
Comment
Comment on Pietrapertosa et al. How to Prioritize Energy Efficiency Intervention in Municipal Public Buildings to Decrease CO2 Emissions? A Case Study from Italy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4434
by Miroslav Variny
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3961; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083961 - 9 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2299
Abstract
This paper responds to the article by Pietrapertosa et al., doi:10.3390/ijerph17124434, published previously in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Its aim is to discuss the appropriateness of the studied method, to analyze its weak sides and to propose its [...] Read more.
This paper responds to the article by Pietrapertosa et al., doi:10.3390/ijerph17124434, published previously in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Its aim is to discuss the appropriateness of the studied method, to analyze its weak sides and to propose its robustness improvement. Thus, data presented in the above study were examined and recalculated, yielding, among others, indicators of annual energy savings (in kWh per m2 of total heated area) and specific proposals investment costs (in € per m2 of total heated area). By analyzing the obtained data for all public buildings, a significantly simplified approach to this problematic has been suggested while several other features of the research method and some presented results lack proper reasoning and discussion. Individual approach to each public building has been proposed and discussed point-by-point to enhance the method’s applicability. As a result, more realistic outcomes are obtained, and suitable investment actions can be proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
3 pages, 270 KiB  
Reply
Reply to Comment on Pietrapertosa et al. How to Prioritize Energy Efficiency Intervention in Municipal Public Buildings to Decrease CO2 Emissions? A Case Study from Italy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4434
by Filomena Pietrapertosa, Marco Tancredi, Michele Giordano, Carmelina Cosmi and Monica Salvia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3760; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073760 - 4 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1625
Abstract
This is a reply to the paper by Miroslav Variny [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and Environmental and Public Health)
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