New Insights on Traditional Fermented Beverages

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710). This special issue belongs to the section "Beverage Technology Fermentation and Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2023) | Viewed by 30387

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, University of Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentations; nonconventional yeasts; aroma; nutrition; health
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Guest Editor
Food Technology Area, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentation; health; nutrition; filamentous fungi; antifungal proteins; fungal biofactories
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Private Bag 16, Palapye 10071, Botswana
Interests: yeast genetics; biodiversity; alcoholic fermentations; stress tolerance; strain developments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditional fermented beverages constitute an extremely interesting group of fermented foods mostly limited to local markets. There are a huge diversity of beverages that can be produced by the action of an immense range of microorganisms on an enormous number of different raw materials by these natural and sustainable processes. Most of these processes have only been poorly studied or not studied at all. However, some of the resulting beverages may be relevant not only because of their sensory characteristics and the product diversification they imply but also for the potential presence of probiotic microorganisms or prebiotic compounds, which can beneficially impact human health. In fact, some studies have been carried out linking the usual consumption of fermented foodstuffs to health benefits.

This Special Issue will cover all research focused on the production of traditional fermented beverages and the different microorganisms involved, paying special attention to the improvement of the products they generate, not only related to product diversification and sensory traits but also regarding nutrition and health enhancement through a natural and sustainable processes.

Dr. Amparo Gamero
Dr. Mónica Gandía
Dr. Nerve Zhou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • traditional food fermentation
  • microorganisms
  • nutrition
  • health
  • sensory analyses
  • sustainability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2082 KiB  
Article
Storage Potential of the Cactus Pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) Fruit Juice and Its Biological and Chemical Evaluation during Fermentation into Cactus Pear Wine
by Louis Ramoba, Maropeng Charles Monyama and Kgabo Moganedi
Beverages 2022, 8(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8040067 - 31 Oct 2022
Viewed by 2354
Abstract
The cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) fruit is widely cultivated and grown naturally in arid regions because it is adaptive to a wide range of soil and environments. The pear fruit is inhabited by different micro-organisms and has chemical composition suitable for wine [...] Read more.
The cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) fruit is widely cultivated and grown naturally in arid regions because it is adaptive to a wide range of soil and environments. The pear fruit is inhabited by different micro-organisms and has chemical composition suitable for wine making. Profiling the contributing micro-organisms and evaluating the chemical parameters of cactus pear wine can assist in selecting reliable microbes for use as starter cultures. Spontaneous fermentation was carried out for 13 days and followed by three months of cold storage. Fermenting microbes were isolated, characterised and identified. The chemical parameters, namely, sugar concentration, ethanol concentration, pH and total acidity, were analysed. A total of 22 micro-organisms were identified, among which nine yeast species, two acetic acid bacteria (Gluconobacter spp.) and eight Bacillus spp. were isolated. The simple sugars were used up, and ethanol was produced to a high concentration of 50.9 g/L. The pH ranged between 2.8 and 2.9; hence, a maximum total acidity of ±25 g/100 mL was achieved. At least 78% of the available tannins were used in the early stages of fermentation. Potassium and magnesium were the highest minerals obtained, and zinc was the lowest. The highest ash content obtained was 7.9 g/100 mL. The vitamin C content was retained and gradually increased throughout the fermentation process. The findings indicate that lasting flavoured wine can be developed from cactus pear fruit because of the fermenting microbes and the chemical composition of the fruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights on Traditional Fermented Beverages)
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14 pages, 3900 KiB  
Article
Microbial and Chemical Dynamics during Marula Wine Fermentation
by Archie Phiri, Daniel La Grange and Kgabo Moganedi
Beverages 2022, 8(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8030050 - 22 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2859
Abstract
Marula wine is traditionally produced through a spontaneous fermentation process and has a huge economic potential in Africa. The current study investigated the contributing microbiota and the metabolites produced during the wine fermentation process. Microbial communities were analyzed by selective cultivation and identified [...] Read more.
Marula wine is traditionally produced through a spontaneous fermentation process and has a huge economic potential in Africa. The current study investigated the contributing microbiota and the metabolites produced during the wine fermentation process. Microbial communities were analyzed by selective cultivation and identified by biotyping and rDNA sequencing. Sugars and volatile compounds were determined with the high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, respectively. Different Lactobacillus spp. were present throughout the fermentation process but dominated the earlier stages of fermentation, together with non-Saccharomyces yeasts, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae and acetic acid bacteria dominated the latter stages. Sucrose, glucose and fructose were detected during the early stages, while ethanol and butanol were present during the latter stages of fermentation. Interestingly, acetic acid and formic acid were detected in relatively high amounts at the latter stages of fermentation. Lactobacillus spp. and S. cerevisiae were identified as the primary contributing microbiota, and Acetobacter aceti and Acetobacter pasteuriannus were associated with the off taste and spoilage of the marula wine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights on Traditional Fermented Beverages)
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Review

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13 pages, 639 KiB  
Review
Recent Trends in Fermented Beverages Processing: The Use of Emerging Technologies
by Mariana Morales-de la Peña, Graciela A. Miranda-Mejía and Olga Martín-Belloso
Beverages 2023, 9(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9020051 - 13 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3643
Abstract
Since ancient times, fermentation has been one of the most utilized techniques for food preservation and for the development of natural products with functional properties at low cost. Nowadays, fermented foods and beverages are highly attractive to consumers since they are perceived as [...] Read more.
Since ancient times, fermentation has been one of the most utilized techniques for food preservation and for the development of natural products with functional properties at low cost. Nowadays, fermented foods and beverages are highly attractive to consumers since they are perceived as natural and potential sources of functional compounds. Research efforts conducted in this area over the years have allowed for an understanding of the main reactions occurring during fermentation related to microbial growth, enzyme activity, metabolite production, and physicochemical changes. As a result, scientists and technologists have been able to improve the fermentation process in terms of efficiency, safety, costs, and high-quality production of products. The aim of this review was to gather the most recent and relevant information about fermentation evolution during the last decades, focused on the application of emerging technologies for the development of fermented beverages as interesting products in the functional food market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights on Traditional Fermented Beverages)
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22 pages, 1404 KiB  
Review
Diet Diversification and Priming with Kunu: An Indigenous Probiotic Cereal-Based Non-Alcoholic Beverage in Nigeria
by Johnson K. Ndukwe, Claret Chiugo Aduba, Kingsley Tochukwu Ughamba, Kenechi Onyejiaka Chukwu, Chijioke Nwoye Eze, Ogueri Nwaiwu and Helen Onyeaka
Beverages 2023, 9(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9010014 - 02 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 7383
Abstract
Kunu is a fermented non-alcoholic beverage consumed all over Nigeria. The drink is served as an alternative to alcohol due to its perceived extreme nourishing and therapeutic properties. Varieties of this beverage are determined mostly by the type of grain, the supplements, sensory [...] Read more.
Kunu is a fermented non-alcoholic beverage consumed all over Nigeria. The drink is served as an alternative to alcohol due to its perceived extreme nourishing and therapeutic properties. Varieties of this beverage are determined mostly by the type of grain, the supplements, sensory additives used, and the process employed during its production. Dietary quality is paramount in nutritional well-being and a key factor in human overall health development. The nutritional quality of grains utilised for Kunu production makes the drink more appealing to a large growing population when compared to some other drinks. Some use Kunu drink as an infant weaning drink, thus serving as a priming beverage for infants due to its rich probiotic and nutritional properties. However, this beverage’s short shelf-life has limited its production scale. This review therefore elaborates succinctly on the diverse therapeutic nutritional properties of the Kunu beverage and the effect of additives and fermentation on the microbial dynamics during Kunu production, as well as the prospect of Kunu in diet diversification and priming for weaning infants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights on Traditional Fermented Beverages)
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17 pages, 656 KiB  
Review
Chemical Composition of Kombucha
by Peyton Bishop, Eric R. Pitts, Drew Budner and Katherine A. Thompson-Witrick
Beverages 2022, 8(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8030045 - 05 Aug 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 12494
Abstract
Kombucha is a fermented sweetened tea with a mixed fermenting culture of yeast and acetic acid bacteria. While the history of kombucha is not completely clear, it is now available around the world and has shown an increase in availability and demand in [...] Read more.
Kombucha is a fermented sweetened tea with a mixed fermenting culture of yeast and acetic acid bacteria. While the history of kombucha is not completely clear, it is now available around the world and has shown an increase in availability and demand in the United States market. The proponents of kombucha consumption tout the varied health benefits it can provide. The final kombucha flavor and composition is a function of both the initial tea used and the fermentation process. While the ascribed benefits are varied and numerous, the number of direct studies has been limited. This review focuses on the current state of understanding of the chemical composition and the potential health effects both positive and negative reported in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights on Traditional Fermented Beverages)
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