Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 57086

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, University of Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentations; nonconventional yeasts; aroma; nutrition; health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Technology Area, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentation; health; nutrition; filamentous fungi; antifungal proteins; fungal biofactories
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods have been part of the human diet for centuries and are a natural strategy for both food diversification and preservation. Through fermentation, it is possible to obtain different types of food products with highly valued organoleptic characteristics, such as better aroma, taste, or texture, while simultaneously improving sanitary quality and extending shelf life. In addition, recent research studies have focused on food fermentations as a natural strategy to enhance the nutritional and functional value of the resulting products, thus contributing to human health. For instance, microorganisms participating in fermentation processes can synthesize nutrients or bioactive compounds as well as increase their bioaccessibility and bioavailability, or they can increase the digestibility of foodstuffs.

On the other hand, fermentations are a very sustainable alternative for food production, as they consume little energy and generate little waste. At the same time, fermentative processes can be applied to reduce waste by-products generated from other food industry processes which, when fermented, can be useful for human nutrition or in other fields.

The main objective of this Special Issue is to publish recent research and reviews in the field of food fermentation for healthy nutrition that benefits consumers, improves their health, and contributes to sustainable development.

All proposals in this field will be reviewed and evaluated for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Amparo Gamero Lluna
Prof. Dr. Mónica Gandía
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food fermentation
  • nutrition
  • health
  • sustainability
  • microorganisms

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

23 pages, 2164 KiB  
Article
Fermented Brewers’ Spent Grain Containing Dextran and Oligosaccharides as Ingredient for Composite Wheat Bread and Its Impact on Gut Metabolome In Vitro
by Prabin Koirala, Alice Costantini, Henry N. Maina, Carlo Giuseppe Rizzello, Michela Verni, Valentina De Beni, Andrea Polo, Kati Katina, Raffaella Di Cagno and Rossana Coda
Fermentation 2022, 8(10), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8100487 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2614
Abstract
Brewers’ spent grain or BSG is a fiber and protein rich food-grade side stream that has remained underutilized due to its poor technological and sensory characteristics. In this study, BSG was fermented with Weissella confusa A16 in presence of sucrose to induce the [...] Read more.
Brewers’ spent grain or BSG is a fiber and protein rich food-grade side stream that has remained underutilized due to its poor technological and sensory characteristics. In this study, BSG was fermented with Weissella confusa A16 in presence of sucrose to induce the synthesis of dextran and maltosyl-isomaltooligosaccharides. Fermented BSG with or without the above polysaccharides was used as ingredient in wheat bread. Digestion of BSG breads was simulated in vitro with Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem, and levels of fecal metabolites were analyzed. Enrichment of BSG breads with in situ dextran and maltosyl-isomaltooligosaccharides improved the baking quality compared to native BSG. Metabolism of free amino acids and synthesis of short chain fatty acids varied at different stages and parts of colon. The increase in butyric acid was similar in both the proximal and distal colon. In situ dextran and maltosyl-isomaltooligosaccharides, and higher content of proteins and fiber in BSG breads had a positive influence towards gut microbiota functionality. Along with several essential amino acids, an increase in amount of γ-aminobutyric acid was also observed after simulated digestion. BSG breads had a significant effect on the gut metabolome during in vitro digestion, showing increased production of microbial metabolites with potential health benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

18 pages, 1334 KiB  
Article
Probiotic and Antifungal Attributes of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates from Naturally Fermented Brazilian Table Olives
by Luara Simões, Natália Fernandes, Angélica de Souza, Luiz dos Santos, Marciane Magnani, Luís Abrunhosa, José Teixeira, Rosane Freitas Schwan and Disney Ribeiro Dias
Fermentation 2022, 8(6), 277; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8060277 - 14 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2297
Abstract
Research with fermented olives as a source of wild Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains with probiotic and biotechnological characteristics constitutes a promising field of work. The present study evaluated in vitro probiotic, antifungal, and antimycotoxigenic potential of LAB isolates from naturally fermented Brazilian [...] Read more.
Research with fermented olives as a source of wild Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains with probiotic and biotechnological characteristics constitutes a promising field of work. The present study evaluated in vitro probiotic, antifungal, and antimycotoxigenic potential of LAB isolates from naturally fermented Brazilian table olives. Among fourteen LAB isolates, the Levilactobacillus brevis CCMA 1762, Lactiplantibacillus pentosus CCMA 1768, and Lacticaseibacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei CCMA 1770 showed potential probiotic and antifungal properties. The isolates showed resistance to pH 2.0 (survival ≥ 84.55), bile salts (survival ≥ 99.44), and gastrointestinal tract conditions (survival ≥ 57.84%); hydrophobic cell surface (≥27%); auto-aggregation (≥81.38%); coaggregation with Escherichia coli INCQS 00181 (≥33.97%) and Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 564 (≥53.84%); adhesion to the epithelial cell line Caco-2 (≥5.04%); antimicrobial activity against the bacteria S. Enteritidis ATCC 564 (≥6 mm), Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 (≥6 mm), Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 8702 (≥3 mm), and the fungi Penicillium nordicum MUM 08.16 (inhibition ≥ 64.8%). In addition, the strains showed the ability to adsorb the mycotoxins aflatoxin B1 (≥40%) and ochratoxin A (≥34%). These results indicate that LAB strains from naturally fermented Brazilian table olives are potentially probiotic and antifungal candidates that can be used for food biopreservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2485 KiB  
Article
Bioconversion of Ginsenosides in American Ginseng Extraction Residue by Fermentation with Ganoderma lucidum Improves Insulin-like Glucose Uptake in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes
by Bo-Yang Hsu, Chia-Hui Chen, Ting-Jang Lu, Min-Hsiung Pan, Chi-Tang Ho, Lucy Sun Hwang and Wei-Lun Hung
Fermentation 2021, 7(4), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7040297 - 06 Dec 2021
Viewed by 2911
Abstract
Ginseng is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines that have been widely used in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Ginsenosides are the unique bioactive saponins occurring in ginseng, and their biological activities have been extensively investigated. A [...] Read more.
Ginseng is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines that have been widely used in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Ginsenosides are the unique bioactive saponins occurring in ginseng, and their biological activities have been extensively investigated. A large amount of ginseng residue is produced as waste product due to its applications in manufacturing functional food products, even though it may still contain bioactive components. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the hypoglycemic activities of American ginseng extraction residue (AmR) via fermentation with Ganoderma lucidum. Our results showed that the total phenolic contents and β-glucosidase activity of AmR profoundly increased after fermentation with G. lucidum. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, stimulation of glucose uptake by treatment with AmR was not significant, while fermented AmR (FAmR) exhibited insulin-like glucose-uptake-stimulatory effects. Importantly, the hypoglycemic effects of FAmR were positively associated with the amount of the deglycosylated minor ginsenosides Rg1, Rg3, and compound K. Taken together, our current findings suggest that bioconversion of AmR by fermentation with G. lucidum may be a feasible and eco-friendly approach to developing a functional ingredient for the management of diabetes, while also resolving the problem of ginseng waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2014 KiB  
Article
Indigenous Yeast, Lactic Acid Bacteria, and Acetic Acid Bacteria from Cocoa Bean Fermentation in Indonesia Can Inhibit Fungal-Growth-Producing Mycotoxins
by Endang Sutriswati Rahayu, Rokhmat Triyadi, Rosyida N. B. Khusna, Titiek Farianti Djaafar, Tyas Utami, Tri Marwati and Retno Utami Hatmi
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030192 - 14 Sep 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 7222
Abstract
Cocoa bean fermentation is an important process in the manufacturing of cocoa products. It involves microbes, such as lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and acetic acid bacteria. The presence of mold in cocoa bean fermentation is undesired, as it reduces the quality and may [...] Read more.
Cocoa bean fermentation is an important process in the manufacturing of cocoa products. It involves microbes, such as lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and acetic acid bacteria. The presence of mold in cocoa bean fermentation is undesired, as it reduces the quality and may produce mycotoxins, which can cause poisoning and death. Aspergillus niger is a fungus that produces ochratoxin A, which is often found in dried agricultural products such as seeds and cereals. In this study, we applied indigenous Candida famata HY-37, Lactobacillus plantarum HL-15, and Acetobacter spp. HA-37 as starter cultures for cocoa bean fermentation. We found that the use of L. plantarum HL-15 individually or in combination Candida famata HY-37, Lactobacillus plantarum HL-15, and Acetobacter spp. HA-37 as a starter for cocoa bean fermentation can inhibit the growth of A. niger YAC-9 and the synthesis of ochratoxin A during fermentation and drying. With biological methods that use indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum HL-15 individually or in combination with Candida famata HY-37 and Acetobacter spp. HA-37, we successfully inhibited contamination by ochratoxin-A-producing fungi. Thus, the three indigenous microbes should be used in cocoa bean fermentation to inhibit the growth of fungi that produce mycotoxins and thus improve the quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 4987 KiB  
Article
Nutritionally Enhanced Probioticated Whole Pineapple Juice
by Wilawan Palachum, Wanna Choorit and Yusuf Chisti
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030178 - 04 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6908
Abstract
Nutritionally enhanced probioticated whole pineapple juice (WPJ, comprising juice of pineapple pulp and peel) beverages were produced by fermentation of WPJ with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WU-P19. The 12 h fermented juice contained between 2.1 × 109 and 3.7 × 10 [...] Read more.
Nutritionally enhanced probioticated whole pineapple juice (WPJ, comprising juice of pineapple pulp and peel) beverages were produced by fermentation of WPJ with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WU-P19. The 12 h fermented juice contained between 2.1 × 109 and 3.7 × 109 live cells of the probiotic per milliliter, depending on the beverage formulation. The beverage had a pH of around 4.1 and a lactic acid content of ~12.8 g L−1. It had a total sugar (glucose, sucrose, fructose, maltose) content of ~100.2 g L−1. During fermentation, some of the initial glucose and fructose were consumed by the probiotic, but sucrose and maltose were not consumed. The original WPJ was free of vitamin B12, but fermentation enhanced vitamin B12 content (~19.5 mg L−1). In addition, fermentation enhanced the concentrations of vitamins B2, B3, and B6, but the bacterium consumed some of the vitamin B1 originally present. From a nutritional perspective, the final probioticated beverage was a good source of vitamin B12, vitamin C and vitamin B6. In addition, it contained nutritionally useful levels of vitamins B1, B2, and B3. The calorific value of the final beverage was 56.94 kcal per 100 mL. The product was stable during 21-day refrigerated (4 °C) storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

38 pages, 4985 KiB  
Review
Fermented Foods of Korea and Their Functionalities
by Su-Jin Jung, Soo-Wan Chae and Dong-Hwa Shin
Fermentation 2022, 8(11), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8110645 - 15 Nov 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 9778
Abstract
Fermented foods are loved and enjoyed worldwide and are part of a tradition in several regions of the world. Koreans have traditionally had a healthy diet since people in this region have followed a fermented-foods diet for at least 5000 years. Fermented-product footprints [...] Read more.
Fermented foods are loved and enjoyed worldwide and are part of a tradition in several regions of the world. Koreans have traditionally had a healthy diet since people in this region have followed a fermented-foods diet for at least 5000 years. Fermented-product footprints are evolving beyond boundaries and taking the lead in the world of food. Fermented foods, such as jang (fermented soybean products), kimchi (fermented vegetables), jeotgal (fermented fish), and vinegar (liquor with grain and fruit fermentation), are prominent fermented foods in the Korean culture. These four major fermented foods have been passed down through the generations and define Korean cuisine. However, scientific advancements in the fermentation process have increased productivity rates and facilitated global exports. Recently, Korean kimchi and jang have garnered significant attention due to their nutritional and health-beneficial properties. The health benefits of various Korean fermented foods have been consistently supported by both preclinical and clinical research. Korean fermented foods effectively reduce the risk of cardiovascular and chronic metabolic diseases, such as immune regulation, memory improvement, obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Additionally, kimchi is known to prevent and improve multiple metabolic diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and improve beneficial intestinal bacteria. These functional health benefits may reflect the synergistic effect between raw materials and various physiologically active substances produced during fermentation. Thus, fermented foods all over the world not only enrich our dining table with taste, aroma, and nutrition, but also the microorganisms involved in fermentation and metabolites of various fermentations have a profound effect on human health. This article describes the production and physiological functions of Korean fermented foods, which are anticipated to play a significant role in the wellness of the world’s population in the coming decades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 319 KiB  
Review
Fermented Foods and Their Role in Respiratory Health: A Mini-Review
by Periyanaina Kesika, Subramanian Thangaleela, Bhagavathi Sundaram Sivamaruthi, Muruganantham Bharathi and Chaiyavat Chaiyasut
Fermentation 2022, 8(4), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8040162 - 03 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3282
Abstract
Fermented foods (FFs) hold global attention because of their huge advantages. Their health benefits, palatability, preserved, tasteful, and aromatic properties impart potential importance in the comprehensive evaluation of FFs. The bioactive components, such as minerals, vitamins, fatty acids, amino acids, and other phytochemicals [...] Read more.
Fermented foods (FFs) hold global attention because of their huge advantages. Their health benefits, palatability, preserved, tasteful, and aromatic properties impart potential importance in the comprehensive evaluation of FFs. The bioactive components, such as minerals, vitamins, fatty acids, amino acids, and other phytochemicals synthesized during fermentation, provide consumers with several health benefits. Fermentation of food is an ancient process that has met with many remarkable changes owing to the development of scientific technologies over the years. Initially, fermentation relied on back-slapping. Nowadays, starter cultures strains are specifically chosen for the type of fermentation process. Modern biotechnological methods are being implemented in the fermentation process to achieve the desired product in high quality. Respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections are the most severe health issues affecting human beings of all age groups, especially children and older adults, during this COVID-19 pandemic period. Studies suggest that the consumption of probiotic Lactobacillus strains containing fermented foods protects the subjects from common infectious diseases (CIDs, which is classified as upper respiratory tract infections, lower respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal infections) by improving the host’s immune system. Further studies are obligatory to develop probiotic-based functional FFs that are effective against CIDs. Presently, we are urged to find alternative, safe, and cost-effective prevention measures against CIDs. The current manuscript briefs the production of FFs, functional properties of FFs, and their beneficial effects against respiratory tract infections. It summarizes the outcomes of clinical trials using human subjects on the effects of supplementation of FFs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
57 pages, 1367 KiB  
Review
Fermentation of Cereals and Legumes: Impact on Nutritional Constituents and Nutrient Bioavailability
by Janet Adeyinka Adebo, Patrick Berka Njobeh, Sefater Gbashi, Ajibola Bamikole Oyedeji, Opeoluwa Mayowa Ogundele, Samson Adeoye Oyeyinka and Oluwafemi Ayodeji Adebo
Fermentation 2022, 8(2), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8020063 - 30 Jan 2022
Cited by 54 | Viewed by 12813
Abstract
Fermented food products, especially those derived from cereals and legumes are important contributors to diet diversity globally. These food items are vital to food security and significantly contribute to nutrition. Fermentation is a process that desirably modifies food constituents by increasing the palatability, [...] Read more.
Fermented food products, especially those derived from cereals and legumes are important contributors to diet diversity globally. These food items are vital to food security and significantly contribute to nutrition. Fermentation is a process that desirably modifies food constituents by increasing the palatability, organoleptic properties, bioavailability and alters nutritional constituents. This review focuses on deciphering possible mechanisms involved in the modification of nutritional constituents as well as nutrient bioavailability during the fermentation of cereals and legumes, especially those commonly consumed in developing countries. Although modifications in these constituents are dependent on inherent and available nutrients in the starting raw material, it was generally observed that fermentation increased these nutritive qualities (protein, amino acids, vitamins, fats, fatty acids, etc.) in cereals and legumes, while in a few instances, a reduction in these constituents was noted. A general reduction trend in antinutritional factors was also observed with a corresponding increase in the nutrient bioavailability and bioaccessibility. Notable mechanisms of modification include transamination or the synthesis of new compounds during the fermentation process, use of nutrients as energy sources, as well as the metabolic activity of microorganisms leading to a degradation or increase in the level of some constituents. A number of fermented products are yet to be studied and fully understood. Further research into these food products using both conventional and modern techniques are still required to provide insights into these important food groups, as well as for an overall improved food quality, enhanced nutrition and health, as well as other associated socioeconomic benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 746 KiB  
Review
Nutritional Contributions and Health Associations of Traditional Fermented Foods
by Berenice Negrete-Romero, Claudia Valencia-Olivares, Gloria Andrea Baños-Dossetti, Beatriz Pérez-Armendáriz and Gabriel Abraham Cardoso-Ugarte
Fermentation 2021, 7(4), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7040289 - 30 Nov 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 7297
Abstract
The growing interest in the consumption and study of traditionally fermented food worldwide has led to the development of numerous scientific investigations that have focused on analyzing the microbial and nutritional composition and the health effects derived from the consumption of these foods. [...] Read more.
The growing interest in the consumption and study of traditionally fermented food worldwide has led to the development of numerous scientific investigations that have focused on analyzing the microbial and nutritional composition and the health effects derived from the consumption of these foods. Traditionally fermented foods and beverages are a significant source of nutrients, including proteins, essential fatty acids, soluble fiber, minerals, vitamins, and some essential amino acids. Additionally, fermented foods have been considered functional due to their prebiotic content, and the presence of specific lactic acid bacterial strains (LAB), which have shown positive effects on the balance of the intestinal microbiota, providing a beneficial impact in the treatment of diseases. This review presents a bibliographic compilation of scientific studies assessing the effect of the nutritional content and LAB profile of traditional fermented foods on different conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and gastrointestinal disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop