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Bioactive Foods and Ingredients for Cardiovascular Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 April 2024) | Viewed by 7210

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California, One Shields Avenue, 3143 Meyer Hall, Davis, CA, USA
Interests: food; nutrigenomics; transcriptomics; CVD; bioactive plant compounds; polyphenols
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Guest Editor
Human Nutrition and Sustainable Diet, School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Interests: food bioactives; nutritional and metabolic diseases; sustainable diets; antibodies; antioxidants; food chemistry; eating habits; immunity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is evident that in spite of significant progress in its prediction, diagnosis, and treatment, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide, with even grimmer projections for the future. The focus is unquestionably shifting to prevention and targeting modifiable risk factors, where dietary factors have been highlighted, once again, as a major determinant of risk. Acknowledging the effect of food systems on our planet, a balanced, varied diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes, with less meat, dairy, simple sugars, and unhealthy fats is widely promoted for both the planet and people, significantly benefiting our cardiovascular health. 

This concept requires significant changes; though, it is putatively considered as the only possible option for sustainable living and health. To be fully accepted as such, we require critical scientific evidence substantiating the underlying health claims. Scientists across the globe aim address the existing gaps and broaden our understanding of the effects of bioactive foods, ingredients, and diet on traditional CVD risk factors (e.g., glycemia, lipids, and blood pressure), and emerging factors (e.g., platelets, monocytes, and functional measures of endothelial health). Cutting-edge analytical techniques are used to measure bioactive compounds in foods and their metabolites in the body. Medicinal and edible herbs, traditional foods, and indigenous fruits and vegetables with promising CVD effects are being tested. Clinical trials are redesigned modified to better fit dietary interventions, considering the effect size and inter-individual variation in response. Omics techniques and system biology approaches are used to explain the effects matrix. New CVD-relevant modulators (e.g., extracellular vesicles and miRNA) are employed as biomarkers and proposed as nutritherapeutic tools. Finally, AI, big data, and machine learning methods are applied, with significant shifts in data collection and analysis,  and data-driven conclusions are generated, offering new opportunities to tackle our planet’s most urgent problems.

This Special Issue aims to present the current knowledge and cutting-edge research in all these areas or any others at the interface between bioactive foods and cardiovascular health. 

If you are engaged in research on bioactive foods and food compounds and their effects on cardiovascular disease, we sincerely invite you to contribute.

Dr. Dragan Milenkovic
Dr. Aleksandra Konic Ristic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive foods
  • functional food
  • phytochemicals
  • nutraceuticals
  • extraction
  • cardiovascular diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 5284 KiB  
Article
Aqueous Fraction from Cucumis sativus Aerial Parts Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction In Vivo by Activating Akt
by Celeste Trejo-Moreno, Zimri Aziel Alvarado-Ojeda, Marisol Méndez-Martínez, Mario Ernesto Cruz-Muñoz, Gabriela Castro-Martínez, Gerardo Arrellín-Rosas, Alejandro Zamilpa, Jesús Enrique Jimenez-Ferrer, Juan Carlos Baez Reyes, Gladis Fragoso and Gabriela Rosas Salgado
Nutrients 2023, 15(21), 4680; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15214680 - 4 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Background: Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a marker of vascular damage and a precursor of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, which involve inflammation and organ damage. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by eNOS, which is induced by pAKT, plays a crucial role in the function [...] Read more.
Background: Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a marker of vascular damage and a precursor of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, which involve inflammation and organ damage. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by eNOS, which is induced by pAKT, plays a crucial role in the function of a healthy endothelium. Methods: A combination of subfractions SF1 and SF3 (C4) of the aqueous fraction from Cucumis sativus (Cs-Aq) was evaluated to control endothelial dysfunction in vivo and on HMEC-1 cells to assess the involvement of pAkt in vitro. C57BL/6J mice were injected daily with angiotensin II (Ang-II) for 10 weeks. Once hypertension was established, either Cs-AqC4 or losartan was orally administered along with Ang-II for a further 10 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) was measured at weeks 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20. In addition, serum creatinine, inflammatory status (in the kidney), tissue damage, and vascular remodeling (in the liver and aorta) were evaluated. Cs-AqC4 was also tested in vitro on HMEC-1 cells stimulated by Ang-II to assess the involvement of Akt phosphorylation. Results: Cs-AqC4 decreased systolic and diastolic BP, reversed vascular remodeling, decreased IL-1β and TGF-β, increased IL-10, and decreased kidney and liver damage. In HMEC-1 cells, AKT phosphorylation and NO production were increased. Conclusions: Cs-AqC4 controlled inflammation and vascular remodeling, alleviating hypertension; it also improved tissue damage associated with ED, probably via Akt activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Foods and Ingredients for Cardiovascular Diseases)
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17 pages, 2478 KiB  
Article
6-Shogaol, an Active Component of Ginger, Inhibits p300 Histone Acetyltransferase Activity and Attenuates the Development of Pressure-Overload-Induced Heart Failure
by Yuto Kawase, Yoichi Sunagawa, Kana Shimizu, Masafumi Funamoto, Toshihide Hamabe-Horiike, Yasufumi Katanasaka, Satoshi Shimizu, Philip Hawke, Kiyoshi Mori, Maki Komiyama, Koji Hasegawa and Tatsuya Morimoto
Nutrients 2023, 15(9), 2232; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15092232 - 8 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2252
Abstract
Hypertrophic stress-induced cardiac remodeling is a compensatory mechanism associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis. Continuation of this response eventually leads to heart failure. The histone acetyltransferase p300 plays an important role in the development of heart failure, and may be a target [...] Read more.
Hypertrophic stress-induced cardiac remodeling is a compensatory mechanism associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis. Continuation of this response eventually leads to heart failure. The histone acetyltransferase p300 plays an important role in the development of heart failure, and may be a target for heart failure therapy. The phenolic phytochemical 6-shogaol, a pungent component of raw ginger, has various bioactive effects; however, its effect on cardiovascular diseases has not been investigated. One micromolar of 6-shogaol suppressed phenylephrine (PE)-induced increases in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in rat primary cultured cardiomyocytes. In rat primary cultured cardiac fibroblasts, 6-shogaol suppressed transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-induced increases in L-proline incorporation. It also blocked PE- and TGF-β-induced increases in histone H3K9 acetylation in the same cells and in vitro. An in vitro p300-HAT assay revealed that 6-shogaol suppressed histone acetylation. The mice underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) surgery, and were administered 0.2 or 1 mg/kg of 6-shogaol daily for 8 weeks. 6-shogaol prevented TAC-induced systolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it also significantly inhibited TAC-induced increases in histone H3K9 acetylation. These results suggest that 6-shogaol may ameliorate heart failure through a variety of mechanisms, including the inhibition of p300-HAT activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Foods and Ingredients for Cardiovascular Diseases)
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Review

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24 pages, 960 KiB  
Review
Beneficial Effects of Spirulina Supplementation in the Management of Cardiovascular Diseases
by Valeria Prete, Angela Carmelita Abate, Paola Di Pietro, Massimiliano De Lucia, Carmine Vecchione and Albino Carrizzo
Nutrients 2024, 16(5), 642; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16050642 - 25 Feb 2024
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Abstract
In recent decades, as a result of rising mortality rates due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), there has been a growing urgency to find alternative approaches to conventional pharmaceutical treatment to prevent the onset of chronic diseases. Arthrospira platensis, commonly known as Spirulina [...] Read more.
In recent decades, as a result of rising mortality rates due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), there has been a growing urgency to find alternative approaches to conventional pharmaceutical treatment to prevent the onset of chronic diseases. Arthrospira platensis, commonly known as Spirulina, is a blue-green cyanobacterium, classified as a “superfood”, used worldwide as a nutraceutical food supplement due to its remarkable nutritional value, lack of toxicity, and therapeutic effects. Several scientific studies have evaluated the cardioprotective role of Spirulina. This article presents a comprehensive review of the therapeutic benefits of Spirulina in improving cardio- and cerebrovascular health. It focuses on the latest experimental and clinical findings to evaluate its antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and antihyperlipidemic properties. The objective is to highlight its potential in preventing and managing risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Foods and Ingredients for Cardiovascular Diseases)
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