Challenges to Limiting Sarcopenia and Age-Related Diseases to Promote Healthy Aging (2nd Edition)

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Geriatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 730

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Human Nutrition Unit (UMR 1019) and CRNH Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d'Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Interests: aging; sarcopenia; muscle wasting; nutrition; nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of nitrogen 15; carbon 13 and protons; metabolism; leucine; alanine; glutamine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, University of Genoa, Viale Benedetto 15,6, I-16132 Genoa, Italy
2. IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
Interests: chronic kidney disease; nutrition; diabetic nephropathy; inflammation; oxidative stress; amino acid and protein metabolism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength was first defined by Rosenberg in 1997 as a hallmark of aging and has since been referred to as sarcopenia. As life expectancy continues to increase worldwide, sarcopenia has become a major public health issue. Moreover, sarcopenia, rather than being considered “a process of normative aging”, is a disease according to the International Classification of Disease, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM).

The impact of sarcopenia on health and well-being is broad and includes impaired function, increased morbidity, increased incidence of institutionalization, reduced quality of life and even death. Sarcopenia increases the risk of age-related diseases such as osteoporosis, obesity, type II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, chronic kidney diseases, cachexia, physical frailty and injury, which accelerate its progression. Thus, it is important we define possible ways of promoting healthy and successful aging.

This Special Issue will highlight the challenges of sarcopenia and age-related diseases to promote healthy aging. It intends to bring together basic researchers and clinicians working in the areas of nutritional sciences, geriatrics, internal medicine and public health. Both original research and review articles will be considered suitable for inclusion in this Special Issue.

Dr. Dominique Meynial-Denis
Prof. Dr. Giacomo Garibotto
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • aging
  • sarcopenia
  • age-related diseases
  • muscle
  • healthy aging

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 18102 KiB  
Article
New Perspectives for Low Muscle Mass Quantity/Quality Assessment in Probable Sarcopenic Older Adults: An Exploratory Analysis Study
by Maria Besora-Moreno, Elisabet Llauradó, Claudia Jiménez-ten Hoevel, Cristina Sepúlveda, Judit Queral, Glòria Bernal, Laura Pérez-Merino, Sergio Martinez-Hervas, Blanca Alabadi, Yolanda Ortega, Rosa Maria Valls, Rosa Solà and Anna Pedret
Nutrients 2024, 16(10), 1496; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16101496 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 488
Abstract
Background: Low muscle mass quantity/quality is needed to confirm sarcopenia diagnosis; however, no validated cut-off points exist. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of sarcopenia through muscle mass quantity/quality parameters, using the bioimpedance analysis (BIA), isokinetic, and ultrasound tools in probable [...] Read more.
Background: Low muscle mass quantity/quality is needed to confirm sarcopenia diagnosis; however, no validated cut-off points exist. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of sarcopenia through muscle mass quantity/quality parameters, using the bioimpedance analysis (BIA), isokinetic, and ultrasound tools in probable sarcopenic community-dwelling older adults (≥60 years). Also, it aimed to suggest possible new cut-off points to confirm sarcopenia diagnosis. Methods: A cross-sectional exploratory analysis study was performed with probable sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic older adults. BIA, isokinetic, and ultrasound parameters were evaluated. The protocol was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT05485402). Results: A total of 50 individuals were included, 38 with probable sarcopenia (69.63 ± 4.14 years; 7 men and 31 women) and 12 non-sarcopenic (67.58 ± 4.54 years; 7 men and 5 women). The phase angle (cut-off: 5.10° men, p = 0.003; 4.95° women, p < 0.001), peak torque (cut-off: 66.75 Newtons-meters (N-m) men, p < 0.001; 48.35 N-m women, p < 0.001), total work (cut-off: 64.00 Joules (J) men, p = 0.007; 54.70 J women, p = 0.001), and mean power (cut-off: 87.8 Watts (W) men, p = 0.003; 48.95 W women, p = 0.008) in leg extension, as well as the the forearm muscle thickness (cut-off: 1.41 cm (cm) men, p = 0.017; 0.94 cm women, p = 0.041), had great diagnostic accuracy in both sexes. Conclusions: The phase angle, peak torque, total work, and mean power in leg extension, as well as forearm muscle thickness, had great diagnostic accuracy in regard to sarcopenia, and the suggested cut-off points could lead to the confirmation of sarcopenia diagnosis, but more studies are needed to confirm this. Full article
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