Effects of Proteins and Lipids on Vascular Function

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 August 2024 | Viewed by 1960

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Nursing and Physiotherapy, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
2. Salamanca Primary Care Research Unit (APISAL), Salamanca Biomedical Research Institute (IBSAL), Chronicity, Primary Care and Health Promotion Research Network (RICAPPS), Salamanca Primary Care Management, Regional Health Management of Castilla y León (SACYL), Salamanca, Spain
Interests: nursing; diabetes mellitus; eHealth

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Nursing and Physiotherapy, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
2. Salamanca Primary Care Research Unit (APISAL), Salamanca Biomedical Research Institute (IBSAL), Chronicity, Primary Care and Health Promotion Research Network (RICAPPS), Salamanca Primary Care Management, Regional Health Management of Castilla y León (SACYL), Salamanca, Spain
Interests: polyphenols; lipids; menopause

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Co-Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Nursing and Physiotherapy, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
2. Salamanca Primary Care Research Unit (APISAL), Salamanca Biomedical Research Institute (IBSAL), Chronicity, Primary Care and Health Promotion Research Network (RICAPPS), Salamanca Primary Care Management, Regional Health Management of Castilla y León (SACYL), Salamanca, Spain
Interests: nursing; lifestyle; cardiovascular health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Arterial stiffness contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and can be modified through dietary habits. Its assessment includes a wide range of vascular function measures.

Fat intake may affect arterial stiffness. Particularly, saturated fatty acids (SFA), trans fats, and cholesterol seem to impair vascular function and increase the risk of arterial stiffness. In contrast, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) appear to improve vascular function and decrease the risk of arterial stiffness. However, there is a need to deeply investigate the impact on vascular function and CVD of SFA replacement by monounsaturated (MUFA) and/or polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids from varying food sources.

Vegetable and animal proteins differ in their influence on cardiovascular health. Red or processed meat and eggs, which contain cholesterol and SFA, could detrimentally affect arterial stiffness. Nonetheless, dairy products (except butter), fish, and lean meat are favourable protein sources that might diminish it. In turn, plant-based proteins such as legumes, nuts, and soy reveal a positive effect on certain cardiometabolic risk factors. Even so, the current evidence is not consistent enough as a result of the difficulty of excluding the interference of other dietary components.

Therefore, the present Special Issue aims to add clarifying information on these topics. Researchers that have conducted studies providing results in this regard are invited to submit manuscripts.

Dr. Rosario Alonso-Domínguez
Dr. José I Recio-Rodríguez
Dr. Natalia Sánchez-Aguadero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dietary macronutrients
  • lipids
  • fats
  • fatty acids
  • proteins
  • peptides
  • amino acids
  • vascular function
  • arterial stiffness
  • cardiovascular disease

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 1240 KiB  
Article
Vascular and Platelet Effects of Tomato Soffritto Intake in Overweight and Obese Subjects
by Anallely López-Yerena, Teresa Padro, Victoria de Santisteban Villaplana, Natàlia Muñoz-García, Antonio Pérez, Gemma Vilahur and Lina Badimon
Nutrients 2023, 15(24), 5084; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15245084 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1678
Abstract
Tomatoes are known for their numerous health benefits, including antioxidants, anti-cancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-neurodegenerative, antiplatelet, and cardio-protective properties. However, their potential health benefits in the Mediterranean diet’s popular soffritto remain largely unexplored in scientific research. The objective was to evaluate the effects of [...] Read more.
Tomatoes are known for their numerous health benefits, including antioxidants, anti-cancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-neurodegenerative, antiplatelet, and cardio-protective properties. However, their potential health benefits in the Mediterranean diet’s popular soffritto remain largely unexplored in scientific research. The objective was to evaluate the effects of soffritto intake on platelet activity, vascular endothelial function, weight, lipid profile, and blood parameters. In a prospective, controlled, randomized two-arm longitudinal cross-over trial, 40 overweight and obese individuals received 100 g/day of soffritto, or a control, for 42 days. The primary outcome was the effect on vascular endothelial function and platelet activity. As exploratory secondary outcomes, anthropometric measures, serum lipid profile, and hemogram profile were measured before and after a 6-week intervention with or without soffritto supplementation. Compared with the control group, soffritto supplementation for six weeks improved collagen-induced (−5.10 ± 3.06%) platelet aggregation (p < 0.05). In addition, after six weeks, a reduction in ADP-induced aggregation (−3.67 ± 1.68%) was also only observed in the soffritto group (p < 0.05). No significant effects of the soffritto intake were observed on vascular endothelial function, anthropometric measures, serum lipid profile, or blood parameters (p > 0.05). In conclusion, as a basic culinary technique, soffritto may have a role in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease by reducing platelet activation, which could contribute to a reduction in thrombotic events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Proteins and Lipids on Vascular Function)
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