Functional Components and Their Modulation of Metabolism

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2024 | Viewed by 708

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Agriculture & Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Interests: functional components; health benefits; metabolic regulation; molecular nutrition; food contaminants; toxic mechanism; functional hydrocolloids; encapsulation; delivery system
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Functional components are being increasingly recognized to have various potential health benefits on host, which include polyphenols, carotenoids, peptides, amino acids, lipids, fatty acids, minerals, vitamins, probiotics, prebiotics, plant metabolites and their combinations. Several studies have indicated that these functional components can reduce the risk of obesity, colonic diseases, noninsulin-dependent diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers, and improve immune functions and inflammatory responses and reduce oxidative stress.

Functional components significantly influence the physiological status of the host by modulating their metabolism, such as lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, bile acid metabolism, energy metabolism, etc. Furthermore, the gut microbiota has been regarded as ‘a metabolic organ’ in the host. It is also increasingly appreciated that some small molecule metabolites produced by gut microbiota are important signaling molecules that mediate the metabolic processes in the host. Therefore, functional components may also modulate the metabolism through the gut microbiota.

This Special Issue of Nutrients entitled “Functional Components and Their Modulation of Metabolism” welcomes the submission of original research and systematic reviews, as well as mini-reviews and short communications, related to the structure, composition and dose of functional components that modulate metabolism, their importance in health and well-being maintenance, and their potential to counteract the development of various diseases.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Yaqiong Zhang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional components
  • modulation of metabolism
  • health benefits
  • gut microbiota
  • chronic diseases

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 2743 KiB  
Article
Effects of sn-2 Palmitic Triacylglycerols and the Ratio of OPL to OPO in Human Milk Fat Substitute on Metabolic Regulation in Sprague-Dawley Rats
by Lin Zhu, Shuaizhen Fang, Yaqiong Zhang, Xiangjun Sun, Puyu Yang, Weiying Lu and Liangli Yu
Nutrients 2024, 16(9), 1299; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16091299 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 544
Abstract
In this study, the influence of total sn-2 palmitic triacylglycerols (TAGs) and ratio of 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl-3-linoleoylglycerol (OPL) to 1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol (OPO) in human milk fat substitute (HMFS) on the metabolic changes were investigated in Sprague–Dawley rats. Metabolomics and lipidomics profiling analysis indicated that increasing [...] Read more.
In this study, the influence of total sn-2 palmitic triacylglycerols (TAGs) and ratio of 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl-3-linoleoylglycerol (OPL) to 1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol (OPO) in human milk fat substitute (HMFS) on the metabolic changes were investigated in Sprague–Dawley rats. Metabolomics and lipidomics profiling analysis indicated that increasing the total sn-2 palmitic TAGs and OPL to OPO ratio in HMFS could significantly influence glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, glycerolipid metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, bile acid biosynthesis, and taurine and hypotaurine metabolism pathways in rats after 4 weeks of feeding, which were mainly related to lipid, bile acid and energy metabolism. Meanwhile, the up-regulation of taurine, L-tryptophan, and L-cysteine, and down-regulations of lysoPC (18:0) and hypoxanthine would contribute to the reduction in inflammatory response and oxidative stress, and improvement of immunity function in rats. In addition, analysis of targeted biochemical factors also revealed that HMFS-fed rats had significantly increased levels of anti-inflammatory factor (IL-4), immunoglobulin A (IgA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px), and decreased levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) and malondialdehyde (MDA), compared with those of the control fat-fed rats. Collectively, these observations present new in vivo nutritional evidence for the metabolic regulatory effects of the TAG structure and composition of human milk fat substitutes on the host. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Components and Their Modulation of Metabolism)
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