Application of Chromatography in Food Analysis, Safety and Quality Control

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 3691

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
I.U. CINQUIMA, Analytical Chemistry Group, Faculty of Sciences, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid, Spain
Interests: chromatography; separation science; food analysis; food safety; pharmaceutical analysis; environmental analysis; method development; method validation; food quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
I.U. CINQUIMA, Analytical Chemistry Group, Faculty of Sciences, University of Valladolid, Paseo de Belén 7, 471011 Valladolid, Spain
Interests: chromatography; separation science; food analysis; food safety; pharmaceutical analysis; environmental analysis; method development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chromatography is probably the most commonly used analytical technique in food science. It is usually applied in the characterization of bioactive compounds and aroma-related compounds in foods, or in the determination of food contaminants such as pesticides, veterinary drugs, or antibiotics, as well as in food authentication and food adulteration detection. This implies that different chromatographic techniques, especially those related to liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and supercritical fluid chromatography, are quite common techniques in food companies and food research centers.

In this regard, this Special Issue on “Application of Chromatography in Food Analysis, Safety and Quality Control” is a unique opportunity to gather the state of the art of chromatographic methods to control the quality and safety of foods. This topic involves scientific communities working in food chemistry, food authentication, food adulteration, and the analysis of residues of pesticides and chemicals in foods, and involves laboratories working on the revalorization and characterization of bioactive compounds from any food. Therefore, papers dealing with both chromatographic method development and the application of chromatographic methods on food topics, including raw materials, are welcome. Additionally, papers discussing the results from chromatographic analyses on food products or raw materials for food production will be included.

Dr. José Bernal del Nozal
Dr. Ana M. Ares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chromatography
  • bioactive compounds
  • chemical residues
  • food chemistry
  • food authentication
  • mycotoxins
  • organic pollutants
  • pesticide residues
  • phytochemicals
  • organic pollutants
  • veterinary drugs
  • food analysis
  • food quality
  • food safety

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1503 KiB  
Article
Development of a Simultaneous Normal-Phase HPLC Analysis of Lignans, Tocopherols, Phytosterols, and Squalene in Sesame Oil Samples
by Jitkunya Yuenyong, Chonlada Bennett, Sudarat Jiamyangyuen, Sugunya Mahatheeranont and Phumon Sookwong
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1368; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091368 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 644
Abstract
The objective of this study was to develop a simultaneous analytical method for the determination of lignans, tocols, phytosterols, and squalene using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array and fluorescence detector (HPLC-DAD-FLD). The method employed a VertisepTM UPS silica HPLC [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to develop a simultaneous analytical method for the determination of lignans, tocols, phytosterols, and squalene using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array and fluorescence detector (HPLC-DAD-FLD). The method employed a VertisepTM UPS silica HPLC column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 µm) with a mobile phase mixture of n-hexane/tetrahydrofuran/2-propanol. This approach enabled the simultaneous analysis of ten compounds within 22 min. The linear correlation (R2) exceeded 0.9901. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were up to 0.43 µg mL−1 for lignans and tocopherols and up to 326.23 µg mL−1 for phytosterol and squalene. The precision and accuracy of the intra-day and inter-day variation were less than 1.09 and 3.32% relative standard deviations (RSDs). Furthermore, the developed method was applied for the analysis of targeted compounds in twenty-eight sesame oil samples (1775–8965 µg g−1 total lignans, 29.7–687.9 µg g−1 total tocopherols, 2640–9500 µg g−1 phytosterol, and 245–4030 µg g−1 squalene). The HPLC method that has been developed was proven to be a reliable and effective tool for the determination of those functional compounds among sesame oil samples. Full article
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15 pages, 3338 KiB  
Article
An Efficient Workflow for Quality Control Marker Screening and Metabolite Discovery in Dietary Herbs by LC-Orbitrap-MS/MS and Chemometric Methods: A Case Study of Chrysanthemum Flowers
by Hanwen Yuan, Qingling Xie, Ling Liang, Jiangyi Luo, Sai Jiang, Caiyun Peng and Wei Wang
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1008; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071008 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 608
Abstract
LC-MS is widely utilized in identifying and tracing plant-derived food varieties but quality control markers screening and accurate identification remain challenging. The adulteration and confusion of Chrysanthemum flowers highlight the need for robust quality control markers. This study established an efficient workflow by [...] Read more.
LC-MS is widely utilized in identifying and tracing plant-derived food varieties but quality control markers screening and accurate identification remain challenging. The adulteration and confusion of Chrysanthemum flowers highlight the need for robust quality control markers. This study established an efficient workflow by integrating UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS/MS with Compound Discoverer and chemometrics. This workflow enabled the systematic screening of 21 markers from 10,540 molecular features, which effectively discriminated Chrysanthemum flowers of different species and cultivars. The workflow incorporated targeted and untargeted methods by employing diagnostic product ions, fragmentation patterns, mzCloud, mzVault, and in-house databases to identify 206 compounds in the flowers, including 17 screened markers. This approach improved identification accuracy by reducing false positives, eliminating in-source fragmentation interference, and incorporating partial verification utilizing our established compound bank. Practically, this workflow can be instrumental in quality control, geolocation determination, and varietal tracing of Chrysanthemum flowers, offering prospective use in other plant-derived foods. Full article
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14 pages, 1243 KiB  
Article
Determination of Pesticide Residues in Vine Leaves Using the QuEChERS Method and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry
by Mehmet Keklik, Ozgur Golge, Miguel Ángel González-Curbelo and Bulent Kabak
Foods 2024, 13(6), 909; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060909 - 17 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 933
Abstract
Commercial viticulture necessitates regular pesticide applications to manage diseases and pests, raising significant concerns regarding pesticide residues among stakeholders. Due to health risks associated with these residues in Turkish vine leaves, the European Commission has increased the frequency of official control from 20% [...] Read more.
Commercial viticulture necessitates regular pesticide applications to manage diseases and pests, raising significant concerns regarding pesticide residues among stakeholders. Due to health risks associated with these residues in Turkish vine leaves, the European Commission has increased the frequency of official control from 20% to 50%. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine multi-class pesticide residues in brined vine leaves from Turkey. A total of 766 samples of vine leaves were collected between May 2022 and June 2023. More than 500 residues were analyzed using the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In-house validation data demonstrated that the analytical method exhibits fit-for-purpose performance in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, and measurement uncertainty. Out of 766 samples analyzed, 180 samples (23.5%) contained one (131, 17.1%) or multiple (49, 6.4%) pesticides. Both the frequencies of occurrence and the rate of maximum residue level (MRL) exceedance increased in 2023 compared to 2022, with the MRL exceedance rate rising from 9.5% to 25.2%. Forty-three different residues were found in quantifiable concentrations and eight of them were non-approved. Among the residues, the non-systemic pyrethroid insecticides, lambda-cyhalothrin (8.0%) and cypermethrin (7.2%), were the two most frequently detected, with concentrations ranging from 0.010 to 0.248 mg kg−1 and from 0.011 to 0.533 mg kg−1, respectively. Turkey is a major exporter of vine leaves and these results provide crucial information regarding pesticide occurrence and quality assessment of vine leaves. The significant increase in both pesticide occurrence and MRL exceedance rates between 2022 and 2023 underscores the urgency for regulatory bodies to reassess current pesticide usage and monitoring practices. The findings emphasize the importance of implementing more stringent rules and improving enforcement methods in order to reduce the spread of unapproved pesticides and ensure adherence to global food safety standards. Full article
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10 pages, 970 KiB  
Article
Heart-Cutting Bidimensional Liquid Chromatography for the Simultaneous Analysis of Veterinary Drugs Residues and Nucleotide Monophosphates in Sheep’s Milk
by Noelia Caballero-Casero, Diego García-Gómez, José Luis Pérez Pavón and Encarnación Rodríguez-Gonzalo
Foods 2024, 13(6), 872; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060872 - 13 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 830
Abstract
Sheep’s milk is a significant source of nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) but can also contain undesirable residues from veterinary drugs, posing a potential human health risk. This study introduces a novel application of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC), in heart-cutting mode, for the simultaneous determination [...] Read more.
Sheep’s milk is a significant source of nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) but can also contain undesirable residues from veterinary drugs, posing a potential human health risk. This study introduces a novel application of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC), in heart-cutting mode, for the simultaneous determination of nucleotides and veterinary drug residues in sheep’s milk. 2D-LC allows for the separation of these compounds in a single chromatographic run despite their differing physicochemical properties. The proposed method separates six veterinary drug residues and five NMPs in a single injection. The compounds were separated using a C18 reversed-phase column in the first dimension and a Primesep SB analytical column in the second dimension. The method performance was evaluated in terms of linearity range, detection and quantification limits, matrix effects, precision, and accuracy. The results demonstrated good linearity and sensitivity, with quantification limits allowing for the quantification of veterinary drugs at the maximum residue level and nucleotides at typical levels found in milk samples. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of sheep’s milk samples acquired from local supermarkets, with recoveries within a range of 70–119% and 82–117% for veterinary residues and NMPs, respectively. Full article
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