Processing and Nutritional Evaluation of Animal Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 1923

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Food and Health, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048, China
Interests: lipid oxidation; processing; lipids; meat; fatty acids; food science

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Guest Editor
School of Liquor and Food Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025, China
Interests: lipid oxidation; processing; lipids; meat; fatty acids; food science

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Guest Editor Assistant
Institute of Quality Standard and Testing Technology for Agro-Products of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China
Interests: lipid oxidation; processing; lipids; meat; fatty acids; food science
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Animal products (e.g., meat, aquatic, dairy products, and eggs) play an increasingly important role in our modern diet and ensuring food security. Processing is an indispensable part of food manufacturing to convert raw material into desirable and digestible forms. The processing of animal products includes both physical, chemical, and biological technologies, such as drying, salting, smoking, enzymolysis, fermenting, etc. There has been increased interest recently in the functional development and utilization of animal by-products, such as animal bone collagen peptides, animal blood, egg shell calcium, and egg shell membrane peptides, etc.  These processing technologies are applied to fulfil some critical requirements of the food industry and consumers, such as safety and enhanced shelf life. They also allow the production of designer products that fulfil special requirements such as reduced sodium, high fiber content, and improved product stability against oxidative processes. Recently, there has been increasing market demand for products with increased functional and nutraceutical value. Nutritional value is an important characteristic for animal products. Nutritional evaluation plays a very important role in guiding the processing of animal products, especially for some functional foods. Meanwhile, scientific nutritional evaluation can also help consumers gain a more accurate understanding of animal products.

Dr. Guofeng Jin
Dr. Yuanyuan Liu
Guest Editors

Dr. Xiaoyan Tang
Guest Editor Assistant

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Keywords

  • animal products
  • processing technologies
  • quality changes
  • animal by-products
  • nutritional evaluation
  • animal proteins and peptides
  • animal lipids

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 950 KiB  
Article
Evaluation and Discrimination of Lipid Components and Iron and Zinc Levels in Chicken and Quail Eggs Available on the Polish Market
by Małgorzata Czerwonka, Agnieszka Białek, Dorota Skrajnowska and Barbara Bobrowska-Korczak
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1571; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101571 - 17 May 2024
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Abstract
All over the world, birds’ eggs are an important and valuable component of the human diet. This study aimed to compare the content of lipid components and their nutritional value as well as iron and zinc levels in chicken and quail eggs commonly [...] Read more.
All over the world, birds’ eggs are an important and valuable component of the human diet. This study aimed to compare the content of lipid components and their nutritional value as well as iron and zinc levels in chicken and quail eggs commonly available on the market. In egg lipids, unsaturated fatty acids were dominant, especially oleic acid, the content of which was about 40% of the total fatty acids (TFAs). Linoleic acid was the major polyunsaturated fatty acid. Compared to other products of animal origin, eggs were characterized by favorable values of lipid quality indices, especially the index of atherogenicity, thrombogenicity, and the hypocholesterolemic-to-hypercholesterolemic ratio. In the present study, no differences were found in the content of tested nutrients between eggs from different production methods (organic, free-range, barn, cages). Based on linear discriminant analysis, inter-breed differences were noticed. Cluster analysis showed that eggs enriched in n3 PUFAs (according to the producers’ declarations) differed from other groups of chicken eggs. However, in eggs from one producer only, the amount of EPA and DHA exceeds 80 mg per 100 g, entitling the use of the nutrition claim on the package. Quail eggs differed from chicken eggs in FA profile and cholesterol and iron levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Nutritional Evaluation of Animal Products)
13 pages, 2187 KiB  
Article
Effects of Gnaphalium affine Extract on the Gel Properties of •OH-Induced Oxidation of Myofibrillar Proteins
by Haijun Chang, Yu Hu, Yuanwei Shi, Jie Xiong and Zhaoying Bo
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1447; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101447 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 470
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effect of Gnaphalium affine extract (GAE) (0.04, 0.2 and 1 mg/g protein) on the gel properties of porcine myofibrillar proteins (MPs) in a simulated Fenton oxidation system, using tea polyphenols (TPs) at similar concentrations of 0.04, 0.2, [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effect of Gnaphalium affine extract (GAE) (0.04, 0.2 and 1 mg/g protein) on the gel properties of porcine myofibrillar proteins (MPs) in a simulated Fenton oxidation system, using tea polyphenols (TPs) at similar concentrations of 0.04, 0.2, and 1 mg/g protein, respectively, as a contrast. The findings revealed that as the TP concentration increased, the water retention of MP gels decreased significantly (p < 0.05). In contrast, MP gels containing medium and high concentrations of GAE exhibited significantly higher water retention than those with low concentrations of GAE (p < 0.05). When the concentration of GAE was increased to 1 mg/g protein, the strength of MP gels was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 33.32% compared with the oxidized control group, suggesting that low and medium GAE concentrations support MP gel formation. A texture profile analysis indicated that an appropriate GAE concentration improved gel structure and texture. Dynamic rheological characterization revealed that low concentrations of TP (0.04 mg/g protein) and low and medium concentrations of GAE (0.04 and 0.2 mg/g protein) strengthened the protein gel system. Conversely, high concentrations of TP and GAE (1.0 mg/g protein) damaged the protein gel system or even promoted the collapse of the gel system. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that higher TP concentrations disrupted the gel, whereas low and medium GAE concentrations maintained a more continuous and complete gel network structure compared with the oxidized control group. This indicates that an appropriate GAE concentration could effectively hinder the destruction of the gel network structure by oxidation. Therefore, based on the obtained results, 0.2 mg/g protein is recommended as the ideal concentration of GAE to be used in actual meat processing to regulate the oxidization and gel properties of meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Nutritional Evaluation of Animal Products)
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17 pages, 4770 KiB  
Article
Irradiation-Assisted Enhancement of Foaming and Thermal Gelation Functionality of Liquid Egg White
by Yan Zhang, Jianying Zhao, Lichao He, Jin Zhu, Yue Zhu, Guofeng Jin, Ruihang Cai, Xiaola Li and Chengliang Li
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091342 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 629
Abstract
Ionizing radiation has its unique popularity as a non-thermal decontamination technique treating with protein-rich foodstuffs to ensure the microbial and sensory quality, particularly for shell eggs. However, the changes in the functional properties of egg protein fractions such as liquid egg white (LEW) [...] Read more.
Ionizing radiation has its unique popularity as a non-thermal decontamination technique treating with protein-rich foodstuffs to ensure the microbial and sensory quality, particularly for shell eggs. However, the changes in the functional properties of egg protein fractions such as liquid egg white (LEW) with macro/microstructural information are still controversial. Hence, this study was designed to elaborate the foaming and heat-set gelation functionality of LEW following different γ-ray irradiation dose treatments (0, 1, 3 or 5 kGy). For such, the physicochemical properties (active sulfhydryl and the hydrophobicity of protein moieties), structural characteristics (through X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry) and interfacial activities (rheological viscosity, interfacial tension, microrheological performance) were investigated. Then, the thermal gelation of LEW in relation to the texture profile and microstructure (by means of a scanning electron microscope) was evaluated followed by the swelling potency analysis of LEW gel in enzyme-free simulated gastric juice. The results indicated that irradiation significantly increased the hydrophobicity of liquid egg white proteins (LEWPs) (p < 0.05) by exposing non-polar groups and the interfacial rearrangement from a β-sheet to linear and smaller crystal structure, leading to an enhanced foaming capacity. Microstructural analysis revealed that the higher dose irradiation (up to 5 kGy) could promote the proteins’ oxidation of LEW alongside protein aggregates formed in the amorphous region, which favored heat-set gelation. As evidenced in microrheology, ≤3 kGy irradiation provided an improved viscoelastic interface film of LEW during gelatinization. Particularly, the LEW gel treated with 1 kGy irradiation had evident swelling resistance during the times of acidification at pH 1.2. These results gave new insight into the irradiation-assisted enhancement of foaming and heat-set gelation properties of LEW. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Nutritional Evaluation of Animal Products)
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