Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: “Challenges in Maintaining Sustainable Food Systems in Changing Climates”

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 April 2023) | Viewed by 10903

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University, Belfast, 19 Chlorine Gardens, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
Interests: food safety; food security and sustainability; aquaculture; feed and food; natural toxins; drug residues; antibiotics; chemical contaminants; climate change; (bio) analytical chemistry; biosensors; diagnostics; immunoassays; mass spectrometry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Atatürk University, 25240 Erzurum, Turkey
Interests: food (bio)chemistry; food mutagens and carcinogens; heterocyclic aromatic amines; food safety; nutrition and health; food quality; meat and seafood processing technology; chromatography; food packaging
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food systems with a contribution of 30% of greenhouse gas emissions are considered as one of the major reasons for climate change. On the other hand, climate change is likely to have a negative impact on food systems, so maintaining sustainable food systems will be even more challenging to accomplish in the future, increasing the importance of climate mitigation.

The aim of this special issue is to gather the recent original research and reviews that focus on addressing the challenges in maintaining sustainable food systems and novel strategies to face these challenges, including food production, processing, packaging, food waste and consumer diet habits. Key areas of focus include, but are not limited to:

  • Innovative strategies to reducing food loss and waste (reducing food loss in retailers and restaurants, by-product valorization, nutrient recovery… etc.);
  • Changing diet habits toward balanced, nutrient-rich and sustainable diets (less meat and dairy products, more fruit and vegetable, more whole food, alternative nutrient sources… etc.);
  • Alternative food process with lower impact on the environment and lower energy demand;
  • Alternative protein sources (plant protein, insects, algae… etc.);
  • Innovative technologies and strategies (sustainable intensification, genetic modification, biotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence) that help maintain and/or environment health with a higher yield of agriculture production.

Prof. Dr. Katrina Campbell
Prof. Dr. Fatih Oz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food systems
  • climate changing
  • sustainability
  • food security
  • food waste
  • dietary shift

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 2161 KiB  
Article
Earth Worming—An Evaluation of Earthworm (Eisenia andrei) as an Alternative Food Source
by Ruchita Rao Kavle, Patrick James Nolan, Alan Carne, Dominic Agyei, James David Morton and Alaa El-Din Ahmed Bekhit
Foods 2023, 12(10), 1948; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12101948 - 10 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2843
Abstract
Aside from their bioremediation roles, little is known about the food and feed value of earthworms. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of the nutritional composition (proximate analysis and profiles of fatty acids and minerals) and techno-functional properties (foaming and emulsion stability and [...] Read more.
Aside from their bioremediation roles, little is known about the food and feed value of earthworms. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of the nutritional composition (proximate analysis and profiles of fatty acids and minerals) and techno-functional properties (foaming and emulsion stability and capacity) of earthworm (Eisenia andrei, sourced in New Zealand) powder (EAP) were investigated. Lipid nutritional indices, ω6/ω3, atherogenicity index, thrombogenicity index, hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic acid ratio, and health-promoting index of EAP lipids are also reported. The protein, fat, and carbohydrate contents of EAP were found to be 53.75%, 19.30%, and 23.26% DW, respectively. The mineral profile obtained for the EAP consisted of 11 essential minerals, 23 non-essential minerals, and 4 heavy metals. The most abundant essential minerals were potassium (8220 mg·kg−1 DW), phosphorus (8220 mg·kg−1 DW), magnesium (744.7 mg·kg−1 DW), calcium (2396.7 mg·kg−1 DW), iron (244.7 mg·kg−1 DW), and manganese (25.6 mg·kg−1 DW). Toxic metals such as vanadium (0.2 mg·kg−1 DW), lead (0.2 mg·kg−1 DW), cadmium (2.2 mg·kg−1 DW), and arsenic (2.3 mg·kg−1 DW) were found in EAP, which pose safety considerations. Lauric acid (20.3% FA), myristoleic acid (11.20% FA), and linoleic acid (7.96% FA) were the most abundant saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. The lipid nutritional indices, such as IT and ω-6/ω-3, of E. andrei were within limits considered to enhance human health. A protein extract derived from EAP (EAPPE), obtained by alkaline solubilisation and pH precipitation, exhibited an isoelectric pH of ~5. The total essential amino acid content and essential amino acid index of EAPPE were 373.3 mg·g−1 and 1.36 mg·g−1 protein, respectively. Techno-functional analysis of EAPPE indicated a high foaming capacity (83.3%) and emulsion stability (88.8% after 60 min). Heat coagulation of EAPPE was greater at pH 7.0 (12.6%) compared with pH 5.0 (4.83%), corroborating the pH-solubility profile and relatively high surface hydrophobicity (1061.0). These findings demonstrate the potential of EAP and EAPPE as nutrient-rich and functional ingredients suitable as alternative food and feed material. The presence of heavy metals, however, should be carefully considered. Full article
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21 pages, 1235 KiB  
Article
The Potential Future of Insects in the European Food System: A Systematic Review Based on the Consumer Point of View
by Giorgio Mina, Giovanni Peira and Alessandro Bonadonna
Foods 2023, 12(3), 646; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030646 - 2 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3501
Abstract
Edible insects recently gained attention as a potential contributor to the future sustainability of the food system. Insect farming has indeed shown to have environmental and nutritional benefits, but edible insects are still an unusual foodstuff in Europe. The purpose of this article [...] Read more.
Edible insects recently gained attention as a potential contributor to the future sustainability of the food system. Insect farming has indeed shown to have environmental and nutritional benefits, but edible insects are still an unusual foodstuff in Europe. The purpose of this article is to analyze the barriers and drivers of insect consumption in Europe and to identify the most promising strategies to convince consumers to include insect-based products in their diets. To answer these research questions, a systematic review of the literature on the consumer’s point of view about insects as food was performed. The results show that the main barrier to the development of this market is related to the psychological rejection of consumers induced by disgust toward entomophagy. To break down these barriers, it is essential to increase the general knowledge about the environmental and nutritional benefits of entomophagy. Furthermore, the limited size of the edible insect market appears to be a structural barrier. Expanding the reach of the market and consumer familiarity with edible insects will increase their acceptability. Finally, some product-related strategies are also highlighted. Furthermore, this article brings new knowledge about the effectiveness of the environmental motive in convincing consumers to try edible insects. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 1187 KiB  
Review
From Industrial Food Waste to Bioactive Ingredients: A Review on the Sustainable Management and Transformation of Plant-Derived Food Waste
by Yassine Jaouhari, F. Travaglia, L. Giovannelli, A. Picco, E. Oz, F. Oz and M. Bordiga
Foods 2023, 12(11), 2183; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12112183 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3991
Abstract
According to the United Nations, approximately one-third of the food produced for human consumption is wasted. The actual linear “Take-Make-Dispose” model is nowadays obsolete and uneconomical for societies and the environment, while circular thinking in production systems and its effective adoption offers new [...] Read more.
According to the United Nations, approximately one-third of the food produced for human consumption is wasted. The actual linear “Take-Make-Dispose” model is nowadays obsolete and uneconomical for societies and the environment, while circular thinking in production systems and its effective adoption offers new opportunities and benefits. Following the “Waste Framework Directive” (2008/98/CE), the European Green Deal, and the actual Circular Economy Action Plan, when prevention is not possible, recovering an unavoidable food waste as a by-product represents a most promising pathway. Using last year’s by-products, which are rich in nutrients and bioactive compounds, such as dietary fiber, polyphenols, and peptides, offer a wake-up call to the nutraceutical and cosmetic industry to invest and develop value-added products generated from food waste ingredients. Full article
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