Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 November 2022) | Viewed by 54921

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy, Foggia, Italy
Interests: quality of fresh and fresh cut fruits and vegetables; innovative pre-treatment; packaging and/or storage condition; modified and controlled atmosphere; logistic cold chain; innovative transport system; no-destructive systems for quality evaluation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy, Foggia, Italy
Interests: fresh fruit and vegetables; minimally processed product; postharvest physiology; storage condition; chemical and physical treatment; modified and controlled atmosphere; active packaging; non-destructive quality evaluation; logistic solutions; nutritional and sensorial evaluation of fruit and vegetables; volatile compounds as quality markers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fruits and vegetables are important sources of nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and bioactive compounds, which provide many health benefits. However, due to non optimal postharvest management, large quantities of fresh or fresh-cut fruit and vegetables loss their quality and nutritional valuees before they reach the consumer.

This special issue covers technologies in harvesting, handling, and storage of vegetables, including storage strategies (active packaging, edible coatings, application of nanotechnology in the postharvest technology of vegetable crops, and more) aimed to improve the shelf-life of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetable.

Dr. Maria Cefola
Dr. Bernardo Pace
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical and chemical pretreatment
  • storage technology
  • innovative packaging
  • active packaging
  • controlled atmosphere
  • modified atmosphere
  • nano sensors
  • edible coating
  • cold plasma

Published Papers (17 papers)

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Editorial

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6 pages, 211 KiB  
Editorial
Advances Postharvest Preservation Technology
by Maria Cefola and Bernardo Pace
Foods 2023, 12(8), 1664; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12081664 - 17 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1069
Abstract
Fruits and vegetables are important sources of nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and bioactive compounds, which provide many health benefits [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

16 pages, 1448 KiB  
Article
Quality of Goji Berry Fruit (Lycium barbarum L.) Stored at Different Temperatures
by Danial Fatchurrahman, Maria Luisa Amodio and Giancarlo Colelli
Foods 2022, 11(22), 3700; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223700 - 18 Nov 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2629
Abstract
Goji berries are widely known for their outstanding nutritional and medicinal properties; they are usually found in the market as dried fruit or as juice because the fruit has a short shelf-life, and little information is available about its postharvest behavior at low [...] Read more.
Goji berries are widely known for their outstanding nutritional and medicinal properties; they are usually found in the market as dried fruit or as juice because the fruit has a short shelf-life, and little information is available about its postharvest behavior at low temperatures. This study aimed to determine the storage performance of goji berry fruit by evaluating physicochemical, and sensorial attributes during storage at three different temperatures (0, 5, and 7 °C) for 12 days in a range that has not been extensively studied before. In addition, fruit respiration and ethylene production rates were also measured at the three temperatures. Fruit stored at 0 °C showed the lowest respiration rate and ethylene production (5.8 mg CO2 kg−1h−1 and 0.7 µg C2H4 kg−1h−1, respectively); however, at this temperature, the incidence and severity of pitting and electrolytic leakage were the highest. In contrast, 5 °C was found to be the best storage temperature for goji berry fruit; the fruit appeared fresh and healthy, had the highest scores during sensory analysis with an acceptable general impression, and had the lowest amount of damage attributable to chilling injury, with 17.1% fruit presenting with shriveling, 12.5% pitting, 6.7% mold, and 35% electrolytic leakage on day 9 of storage. Storage of goji berries at 7 °C resulted in the lowest marketability and the highest incidence of decay. Significant differences were also found in the phytochemical attributes, vitamin C content, soluble solid content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA), SSC/TA ratio, total polyphenol content, 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazy (DPPH), and anthocyanin content. This study revealed that a storage temperature of 5 °C for 9 days is recommended to maintain the quality of fresh goji berry. Thus, broadening the existing knowledge of the postharvest behavior of fresh goji berries; our results can help improve the commercial life of goji berries and ensure high-quality attributes throughout distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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19 pages, 4065 KiB  
Article
Effect of Melatonin on Fruit Quality via Decay Inhibition and Enhancement of Antioxidative Enzyme Activities and Genes Expression of Two Mango Cultivars during Cold Storage
by Alagie Njie, Wen’e Zhang, Xiaoqing Dong, Chengyu Lu, Xuejun Pan and Qingguo Liu
Foods 2022, 11(20), 3209; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11203209 - 14 Oct 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1773
Abstract
The postharvest deterioration of mango fruits is a critical issue limiting mango storage and preservation due to its climacteric nature. This study evaluated the storage behavior of two mango cultivars and their response to exogenous melatonin (MT, 1000 μmol L−1) treatment [...] Read more.
The postharvest deterioration of mango fruits is a critical issue limiting mango storage and preservation due to its climacteric nature. This study evaluated the storage behavior of two mango cultivars and their response to exogenous melatonin (MT, 1000 μmol L−1) treatment in attenuating fruit decay and enhancing fruits’ physiological and metabolic processes and gene relative expression subjected to cold storage. MT treatment in both mango cultivars significantly delayed weight loss, firmness, respiration rate, and decay incidence. However, MT did not influence the TSS, TA, and TSS:TA ratio regardless of the cultivar. Moreover, MT inhibited the decrease in total phenol and flavonoid content and AsA content while delaying the increase in the MDA content of mango during storage in both cultivars. In addition, MT dramatically inhibited the enzyme activity of PPO. In contrast, an increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and APX) and PAL and their genes’ relative expression was noticed in MT-treated fruits versus control in both cultivars. However, MT treatment was cultivar dependent in most parameters under study. These results demonstrated that MT treatment could be an essential postharvest treatment in minimizing decay, maintaining fruit quality, and extending mango fruits’ postharvest shelf life by enhancing the physiological and metabolic processes during cold storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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15 pages, 3012 KiB  
Article
Application of the Hurdle Technology Concept to the Fresh Za’atar (Origanum syriacum) Preservation
by Samer Mudalal, Doaa Kanan, Ola Anabtawi, Alma Irshaid, Mohammed Sabbah, Munqez Shtaya, Faisal Shraim and Gianluigi Mauriello
Foods 2022, 11(19), 3002; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11193002 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1913
Abstract
Oregano (Origanum syriacum) is popularly called za’atar in the Middle East region. It is widely used in the Mediterranean diet as an aromatic herb. This study aimed to evaluate the preservation effect of natural additives, vacuum packaging, and refrigeration on the [...] Read more.
Oregano (Origanum syriacum) is popularly called za’atar in the Middle East region. It is widely used in the Mediterranean diet as an aromatic herb. This study aimed to evaluate the preservation effect of natural additives, vacuum packaging, and refrigeration on the quality traits of fresh oregano. In total, 132 fresh oregano samples were formulated and split into 4 groups (n = 33) labeled group A (100% fresh oregano leaves, Control), group B (fresh oregano 63.2%, 15% fresh onion, 20% oil, 1.8% salt), group C (fresh oregano 61.91%, 15% fresh Allium cepa, 20% oil, 1.8% salt, 1.29% sumac), and group D (fresh oregano 59.2%, 15% fresh Allium cepa, 20% corn oil, 1.8% salt, 4% lactic acid, ultimate pH 4.4). Different quality traits such as color index (L*a*b*), microbiological analysis (total aerobic, anaerobic, and psychrotrophic bacteria and yeasts and molds), and sensory features (taste, flavor, appearance, saltiness, and overall acceptance) were assessed during the storage period (42 days) for all groups. Our study showed that the addition of lactic acid (group D) exhibited a strong preservation effect against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. In this context, group D had significantly lower aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (5.12 vs. 6.7, 6, and 6.7 log (cfu/g); p < 0.05) and (4.75 vs. 6.6, 6.1, 6.77 (cfu/g); p < 0.05) than group A, B, and C; respectively. Group D exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) lower psychrotrophic bacterial count (3.6 log (cfu/g)) during the whole period of storage compared with control. Group B had a lower redness index (a*) (−3.3 vs. −1.8, −1.65, −1.23; p < 0.05) than groups A, C, and D; respectively. In conclusion, our study showed that there is a possibility of improving the preservation of oregano (Origanum syriacum) by using lactic acid and sumac combined with vacuum packaging under refrigeration conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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14 pages, 3923 KiB  
Article
A Synergistic Effect Based on the Combination of Melatonin with 1-Methylcyclopropene as a New Strategy to Increase Chilling Tolerance and General Quality in Zucchini Fruit
by Jorge Medina-Santamarina, María Serrano, María Celeste Ruiz-Aracil, Mihaela Iasmina Madalina Ilea, Domingo Martínez-Romero and Fabián Guillén
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2784; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182784 - 09 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1679
Abstract
Zucchini fruit are highly sensitive to low temperatures leading to significant peel depressions, increasing weight loss and making them impossible to be commercialized. In this study the effect on the reduction of chilling injury (CI) assaying different postharvest treatments to cv. Cronos was [...] Read more.
Zucchini fruit are highly sensitive to low temperatures leading to significant peel depressions, increasing weight loss and making them impossible to be commercialized. In this study the effect on the reduction of chilling injury (CI) assaying different postharvest treatments to cv. Cronos was evaluated. We have compared the application of substances such as 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) with the application of a natural origin compound as melatonin (MT), both with demonstrated activity against CI in different vegetal products. The effects of MT (1 mM) by dipping treatment of 1 h and 1-MCP (2400 ppb) have been evaluated on zucchini fruit during 15 days of storage at 4 °C plus 2 days at 20 °C. Treatments applied independently improved some fruit quality parameters in comparison with control fruit but were not able to manage CI even though they mitigated the impact on several parameters. However, when these two separated strategies were combined, zucchini cold tolerance increased with a synergic trend. This synergic effect affected in general all parameters but specially CI, being also the only lot in which zucchini fruit were most effectively preserved. This is the first evidence in which a clear positive effect on zucchini chilling tolerance has been obtained combining these two different strategies. In this sense, the combined effect of 1-MCP and MT could be a suitable tool to reach high quality standards and increasing shelf life under suboptimal temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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16 pages, 3067 KiB  
Article
Large-Scale, High-Throughput Phenotyping of the Postharvest Storage Performance of ‘Rustenburg’ Navel Oranges and the Development of Shelf-Life Prediction Models
by Abiola Owoyemi, Ron Porat, Amnon Lichter, Adi Doron-Faigenboim, Omri Jovani, Noam Koenigstein and Yael Salzer
Foods 2022, 11(13), 1840; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11131840 - 22 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1618
Abstract
We conducted a large-scale, high-throughput phenotyping analysis of the effects of various pre-harvest and postharvest features on the quality of ‘Rustenburg’ navel oranges, in order to develop shelf-life prediction models to enable the use of the First Expired, First Out logistics strategy. The [...] Read more.
We conducted a large-scale, high-throughput phenotyping analysis of the effects of various pre-harvest and postharvest features on the quality of ‘Rustenburg’ navel oranges, in order to develop shelf-life prediction models to enable the use of the First Expired, First Out logistics strategy. The examined pre-harvest features included harvest time and yield, and the examined postharvest features included storage temperature, relative humidity during storage and duration of storage. All together, we evaluated 12,000 oranges (~4 tons) from six different orchards and conducted 170,576 measurements of 14 quality parameters. Storage time was found to be the most important feature affecting fruit quality, followed by storage temperature, harvest time, yield and humidity. The examined features significantly affected (p < 0.001) fruit weight loss, firmness, decay, color, peel damage, chilling injury, internal dryness, acidity, vitamin C and ethanol levels, and flavor and acceptance scores. Four regression models were evaluated for their ability to predict fruit quality based on pre-harvest and postharvest features. Extreme gradient boosting (XGBoost) combined with a duplication approach was found to be the most effective approach. It allowed for the prediction of fruit-acceptance scores among the full data set, with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.217 and an R2 of 0.891. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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16 pages, 1627 KiB  
Article
Application of an Eco-Friendly Antifungal Active Package to Extend the Shelf Life of Fresh Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L. cv. ‘Kweli’)
by Tiago M. Vieira, Vítor D. Alves and Margarida Moldão Martins
Foods 2022, 11(12), 1805; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121805 - 19 Jun 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2877
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to extend the shelf life of fresh red raspberry (Rubus idaeus. L. cv. ‘Kweli’) by using active film-pads inside commercial compostable packages. The pads were produced with chitosan (Ch) with the incorporation of green [...] Read more.
The main objective of this study was to extend the shelf life of fresh red raspberry (Rubus idaeus. L. cv. ‘Kweli’) by using active film-pads inside commercial compostable packages. The pads were produced with chitosan (Ch) with the incorporation of green tea (GTE) and rosemary (RSME) ethanolic extracts as natural antifungal agents. Pads were placed on the bottom of commercial fruit trays underneath the fruits, and the trays were heat-sealed with a polyacid lactic (PLA) film. Preservation studies were carried out over 14 days of storage at refrigeration temperature (4 °C). Raspberry samples were periodically analyzed throughout storage, in terms of quality attributes (fungal decay, weight loss, firmness, surface color, pH, total soluble solids), total phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Gas composition inside the packages was also analyzed over time. From the packaging systems tested, the ones with active film-pads Ch + GTE and Ch + RSME were highly effective in reducing fungal growth and decay of raspberry during storage, showing only around 13% and 5% of spoiled fruits after 14 days, respectively, in contrast with the packages without pads (around 80% of spoiled fruits detected). In addition, fruits preserved using packages with Ch + RSME active film-pads showed lower mass loss (5.6%), decreased firmness (3.7%) and reduced antioxidant activity (around 9% and 15% for DPPH and FRAP methods, respectively). This sustainable packaging presents a potential strategy for the preservation of raspberries and other highly perishable small fruits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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16 pages, 1298 KiB  
Article
Quality Attributes of Refrigerated Barhi Dates Coated with Edible Chitosan Containing Natural Functional Ingredients
by Kashif Ghafoor, Fahad Y. Al-Juhaimi, Elfadil E. Babiker, Isam A. Mohamed Ahmed, Syed Ali Shahzad and Omer N. Alsawmahi
Foods 2022, 11(11), 1584; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11111584 - 28 May 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1697
Abstract
Edible chitosan coatings with natural functional ingredients were used to preserve quality attributes of fresh Barhi date fruit. Fruits were coated with chitosan and/or 1 and 2% olive cake extract (OCE) or orange peel extract (OPE). Both coated and uncoated fruits were stored [...] Read more.
Edible chitosan coatings with natural functional ingredients were used to preserve quality attributes of fresh Barhi date fruit. Fruits were coated with chitosan and/or 1 and 2% olive cake extract (OCE) or orange peel extract (OPE). Both coated and uncoated fruits were stored at 4 °C for 4 weeks. A slight decrease in the pH and increase in acidity with storage was observed. However, when chitosan was mixed with OCE or OPE, an increase in pH was observed with a concomitant decrease in acidity. The phenolic content of the samples was decreased with time. However, coating the date with OCE or OPE significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased the total phenolic with a concomitant increase in radical scavenging activity. The textural properties, particularly hardness, were better preserved in case of coated dates. The sensory evaluation data showed non-significant changes in the acceptability of the Barhi dates throughout the storage period. Chitosan-coating significantly (p ≤ 0.05) inhibited mold growth over time. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed difference among different coatings. According to principal component analysis (PCA), OCE and OPE were found to have protective effects on fruit quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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14 pages, 2281 KiB  
Article
Rapid and Non-Destructive Techniques for the Discrimination of Ripening Stages in Candonga Strawberries
by Michela Palumbo, Rosaria Cozzolino, Carmine Laurino, Livia Malorni, Gianluca Picariello, Francesco Siano, Matteo Stocchero, Maria Cefola, Antonia Corvino, Roberto Romaniello and Bernardo Pace
Foods 2022, 11(11), 1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11111534 - 24 May 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2030
Abstract
Electronic nose (e-nose), attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and image analysis (IA) were used to discriminate the ripening stage (half-red or red) of strawberries (cv Sabrosa, commercially named Candonga), harvested at three different times (H1, H2 and H3). Principal component analysis [...] Read more.
Electronic nose (e-nose), attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and image analysis (IA) were used to discriminate the ripening stage (half-red or red) of strawberries (cv Sabrosa, commercially named Candonga), harvested at three different times (H1, H2 and H3). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the e-nose, ATR-FTIR and IA data allowed us to clearly discriminate samples based on the ripening stage, as in the score space they clustered in distinct regions of the plot. Moreover, a correlation analysis between the e-nose sensor and 57 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which were overall detected in all the investigated fruit samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS), allowed us to distinguish half-red and red strawberries, as the e-nose sensors gave distinct responses to samples with different flavours. Three suitable broad bands were individuated by PCA in the ATR-FTIR spectra to discriminate half-red and red samples: the band centred at 3295 cm−1 is generated by compounds that decline, whereas those at 1717 cm−1 and at 1026 cm−1 stem from compounds that accumulate during ripening. Among the chemical parameters (titratable acidity, total phenols, antioxidant activity and total soluble solid) assayed in this study, only titratable acidity was somehow correlated to ATR-FTIR and IA patterns. Thus, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and IA might be exploited to rapidly assess titratable acidity, which is an objective indicator of the ripening stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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16 pages, 1499 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Pectin-Based Coating Added with a Lemon Byproduct Extract on Quality Preservation of Fresh-Cut Carrots
by Valeria Imeneo, Amalia Piscopo, Olga Martín-Belloso and Robert Soliva-Fortuny
Foods 2022, 11(9), 1314; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11091314 - 30 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2322
Abstract
The effect of an edible pectin-based coating supplemented with a lemon byproduct extract on the quality attributes of fresh-cut carrots was studied. Color, hardness, microbial growth, respiratory activity, and antioxidant properties of fresh-cut carrots were studied during 14 days of storage at 4 [...] Read more.
The effect of an edible pectin-based coating supplemented with a lemon byproduct extract on the quality attributes of fresh-cut carrots was studied. Color, hardness, microbial growth, respiratory activity, and antioxidant properties of fresh-cut carrots were studied during 14 days of storage at 4 °C. The application of a pectin-based coating containing a lemon byproduct extract preserved carrots’ physiological parameters, reduced their physiological activity and, thus, delayed senescence. This aspect was also confirmed by the reduced O2 consumption of the coated carrots due to the slowing down of the product’s metabolic reactions. Moreover, coated carrots were characterized by limited changes in colour (ΔE < 3) and white-blush development on both cortical tissue and vascular cylinder, and the presence of calcium chloride in the coating formulation helped to maintain carrots’ hardness throughout storage. In addition, treatment with pectin-based coating and lemon byproduct extract improved microbiological stability of fresh-cut carrots, showing the lowest value of total bacterial count immediately after treatment (2.58 log CFU g−1). This kind of treatment also resulted in a significant preservation of valuable compounds (17.22 mg GAE 100 g−1) and antioxidant activity level (289.49 µM Trolox 100 g−1), reducing the wounding stress induced by processing operations for at least ten days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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15 pages, 1383 KiB  
Article
Assessment of “Sugranineteen” Table Grape Maturation Using Destructive and Auto-Fluorescence Methods
by Najwane Hamie, Luigi Tarricone, Vincenzo Verrastro, Giuseppe Natrella, Michele Faccia and Giuseppe Gambacorta
Foods 2022, 11(5), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11050663 - 24 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1705
Abstract
The optimal harvesting of table grapes is commonly determined based on technological and phenolic indices analyzed over the course of its maturity. The classical techniques used for these analyses are destructive, time-consuming, and work for a limited number of samples that may not [...] Read more.
The optimal harvesting of table grapes is commonly determined based on technological and phenolic indices analyzed over the course of its maturity. The classical techniques used for these analyses are destructive, time-consuming, and work for a limited number of samples that may not represent the heterogeneity of the vineyard. This study aimed to follow the ripening season of table grapes using non-destructive tools as a rapid and accurate alternative for destructive techniques. Grape samples were collected from a Sugranineteen vineyard during the ripening season to measure the basic maturity indices via wet chemistry, and total polyphenols, anthocyanins, and flavonoids were evaluated by spectrophotometry. Fluorescent readings were collected from intact clusters with a portable optical sensor (Multiplex® 3, Force-A, France) that generates indices correlated to different maturity parameters. Results revealed strong relationships between the Multiplex® indices ANTH_RG and FERARI and the skin anthocyanin content, with R2 values equal to 0.9613 and 0.8713, respectively. The NBI_R index was also related to total anthocyanins (R2 = 0.8032), while the SFR_R index was linked to the titratable acidity (R2 = 0.6186), the sugar content (R2 = 0.7954), and to the color index of red grapes (CIRG) (R2 = 0.7835). Results demonstrated that Multiplex® 3 can be applied on intact clusters as an effective non-destructive tool for a rapid estimation of table grapes’ anthocyanin content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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18 pages, 1519 KiB  
Article
Effects of the Use of Different Temperature and Calcium Chloride Treatments during Storage on the Quality of Fresh-Cut “Xuebai” Cauliflowers
by Bingyu Mu, Jianxin Xue, Shujuan Zhang and Zezhen Li
Foods 2022, 11(3), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030442 - 02 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2235
Abstract
This study revealed the effect of the use of different temperature and calcium chloride (CaCl2) treatments on the storage quality of fresh-cut “Xuebai” cauliflowers. Fresh-cut “Xuebai” cauliflowers were soaked with 2% CaCl2 solution at different temperatures. The change in the [...] Read more.
This study revealed the effect of the use of different temperature and calcium chloride (CaCl2) treatments on the storage quality of fresh-cut “Xuebai” cauliflowers. Fresh-cut “Xuebai” cauliflowers were soaked with 2% CaCl2 solution at different temperatures. The change in the firmness, color, and ascorbic acid (ASA), total glucosinolates (TGLS), polygalacturonase (PG), and lipoxygenase (LOX) content of fresh-cut “Xuebai” cauliflowers during the cold storage period was assessed. In addition, the sensory quality was also evaluated. The results show that the combined treatments with CaCl2 at different temperatures could effectively maintain the storage quality of fresh-cut “Xuebai” cauliflowers. Then, a method based on factor analysis with comprehensive quality evaluation was proposed. A factor analysis with a principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted on nine indicators of cauliflowers. Two principal components were extracted with a cumulative contribution rate of 97.513%. The results demonstrated that the treatment with the best fresh-keeping effect of cauliflowers in storage was the combination treatment at 40 °C with 2% CaCl2 solution, while the optimal storage period was 15 days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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17 pages, 3482 KiB  
Article
Profiles of Volatile and Phenolic Compounds as Markers of Ripening Stage in Candonga Strawberries
by Rosaria Cozzolino, Bernardo Pace, Michela Palumbo, Carmine Laurino, Gianluca Picariello, Francesco Siano, Beatrice De Giulio, Sergio Pelosi and Maria Cefola
Foods 2021, 10(12), 3102; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10123102 - 14 Dec 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2648
Abstract
Volatile compounds, quality traits (total phenols and antioxidant capacity) and High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-isolated polyphenols of strawberries, variety Sabrosa, commercially referred to as “Candonga”, harvested at three different times (H1, H2 and H3) and at two different ripening stages, namely half-red (Half-red-H1, Half-red-H2 [...] Read more.
Volatile compounds, quality traits (total phenols and antioxidant capacity) and High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-isolated polyphenols of strawberries, variety Sabrosa, commercially referred to as “Candonga”, harvested at three different times (H1, H2 and H3) and at two different ripening stages, namely half-red (Half-red-H1, Half-red-H2 and Half-red-H3) and red (Red-H1, Red-H2 and Red-H3) were evaluated. Dominant anthocyanins, namely cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside and pelargonidin-3-O-rutinoside, as well as p-coumaryl hexoside increased during harvesting, differently from flavonoids, such as quercetin-3-O-glucoside, kaempferol-3-O-glucoronide and quercetin 3-O-glucoronide, that declined. Samples clustered in different quadrants of the principal component analysis (PCA) performed on volatiles, quality traits and phenolic compounds, highlighting that only the red samples were directly correlated to volatile components, as volatiles clearly increased both in number and amount during ripening. In particular, volatiles with a positive impact on the consumers’ acceptance, including butyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, nonanal, terpenes and lactones, were positively associated with the Red-H1 and Red-H2 strawberries, while volatiles with negative coefficients related to consumer liking, including isopropyl butyrate, isoamyl butyrate and mesifurane directly correlated with the Red-H3 samples. Accordingly, strawberries harvested at Red-H1 and Red-H2 ripening stages could be preferred by the consumers compared to the Red-H3 fruit. Altogether, these results could help to individuate quality traits as putative markers of the ripening stage, and optimize the process of post-harvesting ripening to preserve or improve the desirable aromatic characteristics of strawberries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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17 pages, 7142 KiB  
Article
Synergy of Nitric Oxide and 1-Methylcyclopropene Treatment in Prolong Ripening and Senescence of Peach Fruit
by Xiaoqin Wu, Jiawei Yuan, Xiaoqing Wang, Mingliang Yu, Ruijuan Ma and Zhifang Yu
Foods 2021, 10(12), 2956; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10122956 - 01 Dec 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1781
Abstract
Peach is a putrescible fruit thus drastically restricting its postharvest storage life. In recent years, the application of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and nitric oxide (NO) in postharvest fruit quality control has received considerable attention and investigative efforts due to the advantages of using relatively [...] Read more.
Peach is a putrescible fruit thus drastically restricting its postharvest storage life. In recent years, the application of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and nitric oxide (NO) in postharvest fruit quality control has received considerable attention and investigative efforts due to the advantages of using relatively low concentrations and short-time treatment duration. In the present study, the effects of various 1-MCP and NO treatments on peach fruit (Prunus persica L. cv. Xiahui-8) stored at 25 °C were evaluated and compared. Results indicated that the combination treatment with both chemical agents (MN) was most effective in postponing peach ripening and preserving fruit quality, followed by 1-MCP and NO treatment alone. We also demonstrated that NO could delay fruit senescence mainly by stimulating antioxidant enzymes, while 1-MCP overly outperformed NO in the treatment of ‘Xiahui-8′ peach in slowing down respiration rate, inhibiting ethylene production, maintaining high firmness and reducing ROS content. NO treatment showed a greater influence on phenolic compounds than 1-MCP especially anthocyanins, flavanones and flavones according to LC/MS analysis. The phenolic change in MN group were highly associated to NO treatment. Through this study we provide informative physiological, biochemical and molecular evidence for the beneficial effects of the combined 1-MCP and NO treatment on peach fruit based on a functional synergy between these two chemical agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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15 pages, 3233 KiB  
Article
Physiochemical Responses of the Kernel Quality, Total Phenols and Antioxidant Enzymes of Walnut in Different Forms to the Low-Temperature Storage
by Yanping Ma, Chaoye Wang, Chaobin Liu, Jiawei Tan, Huiling Ma and Jin Wang
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2027; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092027 - 28 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3767
Abstract
Fresh walnut is obtaining high attention due to its pleasant taste and health benefits. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of storage temperatures (0 °C and −20 °C) on the kernel quality, total phenols, and antioxidant enzyme activities of walnuts in three [...] Read more.
Fresh walnut is obtaining high attention due to its pleasant taste and health benefits. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of storage temperatures (0 °C and −20 °C) on the kernel quality, total phenols, and antioxidant enzyme activities of walnuts in three forms (fresh kernels, walnuts with green husk, and walnuts with shell). For a short storage within 3 months at 0 °C, the results revealed that walnuts with green husk provided a better walnut kernel quality resulting from its lower acid value and peroxide value, together with a higher total phenol content and total antioxidant activity, compared with other forms of walnuts. In comparison, frozen storage at −20 °C for a long duration (up to 10 months), found that walnuts with shell showed advantages in improving the kernel quality (fatty acid content, total phenols, and total antioxidant activity) and antioxidant enzyme (peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase) activities in the kernels, leading to an acceptable range of acid value and peroxide value, compared with other forms of walnuts. Thus, frozen storage at −20 °C showed a potential application in maintaining the walnut kernel quality, especially the walnuts with shell. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

19 pages, 4677 KiB  
Review
Advances in Postharvest Storage and Preservation Strategies for Pleurotus eryngii
by Yuxi Guo, Xuefeng Chen, Pin Gong, Ruotong Wang, Zhuoya Qi, Zhenfang Deng, Aoyang Han, Hui Long, Jiating Wang, Wenbo Yao, Wenjuan Yang, Jing Wang and Nan Li
Foods 2023, 12(5), 1046; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12051046 - 01 Mar 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3771
Abstract
The king oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii) is a delicious edible mushroom that is highly prized for its unique flavor and excellent medicinal properties. Its enzymes, phenolic compounds and reactive oxygen species are the keys to its browning and aging and result [...] Read more.
The king oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii) is a delicious edible mushroom that is highly prized for its unique flavor and excellent medicinal properties. Its enzymes, phenolic compounds and reactive oxygen species are the keys to its browning and aging and result in its loss of nutrition and flavor. However, there is a lack of reviews on the preservation of Pl. eryngii to summarize and compare different storage and preservation methods. This paper reviews postharvest preservation techniques, including physical and chemical methods, to better understand the mechanisms of browning and the storage effects of different preservation methods, extend the storage life of mushrooms and present future perspectives on technical aspects in the storage and preservation of Pl. eryngii. This will provide important research directions for the processing and product development of this mushroom. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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29 pages, 3721 KiB  
Review
Emerging Postharvest Technologies to Enhance the Shelf-Life of Fruit and Vegetables: An Overview
by Michela Palumbo, Giovanni Attolico, Vittorio Capozzi, Rosaria Cozzolino, Antonia Corvino, Maria Lucia Valeria de Chiara, Bernardo Pace, Sergio Pelosi, Ilde Ricci, Roberto Romaniello and Maria Cefola
Foods 2022, 11(23), 3925; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11233925 - 05 Dec 2022
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 16232
Abstract
Quality losses in fresh produce throughout the postharvest phase are often due to the inappropriate use of preservation technologies. In the last few decades, besides the traditional approaches, advanced postharvest physical and chemical treatments (active packaging, dipping, vacuum impregnation, conventional heating, pulsed electric [...] Read more.
Quality losses in fresh produce throughout the postharvest phase are often due to the inappropriate use of preservation technologies. In the last few decades, besides the traditional approaches, advanced postharvest physical and chemical treatments (active packaging, dipping, vacuum impregnation, conventional heating, pulsed electric field, high hydrostatic pressure, and cold plasma) and biocontrol techniques have been implemented to preserve the nutritional value and safety of fresh produce. The application of these methodologies after harvesting is useful when addressing quality loss due to the long duration when transporting products to distant markets. Among the emerging technologies and contactless and non-destructive techniques for quality monitoring (image analysis, electronic noses, and near-infrared spectroscopy) present numerous advantages over the traditional, destructive methods. The present review paper has grouped original studies within the topic of advanced postharvest technologies, to preserve quality and reduce losses and waste in fresh produce. Moreover, the effectiveness and advantages of some contactless and non-destructive methodologies for monitoring the quality of fruit and vegetables will also be discussed and compared to the traditional methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Post-harvest Preservation Technology)
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