Novel and Green Processing Technology Applied in Dairy Products Series II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2099

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, School of Agriculture, Polytechnic University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: dairy and meat science; membrane technologies; valorization of food processing byproducts and food security
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Agriculture School, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: natural products; bioactive ingredients; recovery and extraction processes; antioxidants; antimicrobials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to highlight current advances in the application of green processing technologies to the dairy industry. The growing concern for the environment, the increasingly stringent standards regarding environment protection, and economic competitiveness have led to more environmentally friendly approaches that have resulted in pollution prevention and efficiency maximization. The development of new technologies in the food industry envisaging a reduction in environmental impacts and energy consumption is of particular interest to academics and to food industry professionals. The new technologies must also maintain or improve food quality attributes such as nutrient content and sensory quality. In this Special Issue, particular attention will be given to new and more sustainable technologies, the development of new products, or the valorization of dairy byproducts. Life cycle analysis, circular economy strategies, and best available technologies for cleaning and disinfection will also be considered. Investigations on how new technologies and new ingredients affect food quality in all its dimensions are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Carlos José Dias Pereira
Prof. Dr. Marta H. Henriques
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • membrane technologies
  • byproduct valorization
  • whey
  • probiotics
  • active packaging
  • cleaning
  • disinfection
  • life cycle analysis
  • new product development
  • circular economy

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

19 pages, 1994 KiB  
Article
Low Fat Yoghurts Produced with Different Protein Levels and Alternative Natural Sweeteners
by Lara Campos, Paulina Tuma, Tânia Silva, David Gomes, Carlos Dias Pereira and Marta H. F. Henriques
Foods 2024, 13(2), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020250 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 835
Abstract
The food industry is looking for substitutes for sucrose in food items due to the excessive consumption of products with added sugar and the demand for healthier products. Alternative natural sweeteners can help achieve this goal. Different types of low-fat yoghurts (1% fat), [...] Read more.
The food industry is looking for substitutes for sucrose in food items due to the excessive consumption of products with added sugar and the demand for healthier products. Alternative natural sweeteners can help achieve this goal. Different types of low-fat yoghurts (1% fat), with low-protein and high-protein levels (3% and 4.5–6.5% protein, respectively), were produced using alternative natural sweeteners. The low-protein yoghurts were made with stevia (0.03% w/w) or agave syrup (4.5% w/w). The high-protein yoghurts were made with stevia (0.04% w/w), xylitol (6% w/w) or honey (6% w/w). Sucrose (6% w/w) was used as a control in both trials. pH and titratable acidity, CIEL*a*b* color parameters, syneresis index, rheology and the texture profile of the low-fat yoghurts were evaluated over refrigerated storage. All products underwent sensory evaluation by an untrained panel. The high-protein yoghurts were found to be more acidic (>1% as lactic acid), had a lower syneresis index (between 2.1 and 16.2%) and a better consistency (stronger gel structure) than the low-protein yoghurts. In terms of rheological parameters, stevia-sweetened yoghurts scored higher than the other sweetened yoghurts, showing a better gel structure. The different sweeteners tested did not significantly affect the sensory properties of the yoghurts, although the high-protein yoghurts scored higher for most of the attributes evaluated. Overall, consumers preferred stevia-sweetened yoghurts to yoghurts sweetened with sucrose or agave for the low-protein yoghurts. Of the tested formulations, those containing high protein with the alternative natural sweetener xylitol received higher scores in all attributes. These results reveal the potential of the tested natural sweeteners as sucrose substitutes, while contributing to improving the nutritional value of yoghurts. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3215 KiB  
Article
Unravelling the Proteomic Profiles of Bovine Colostrum and Mature Milk Derived from the First and Second Lactations
by Zhen Feng, Yan Shen, Gongjian Fan, Tingting Li, Caie Wu and Yuhui Ye
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4056; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224056 - 07 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1009
Abstract
Bovine colostrum (BC) and mature bovine milk are highly nutritious. In addition to being consumed by adults, these dairy products are also used as protein ingredients for infant formula. However, the differences in the nutritional composition of BC and mature milk, especially regarding [...] Read more.
Bovine colostrum (BC) and mature bovine milk are highly nutritious. In addition to being consumed by adults, these dairy products are also used as protein ingredients for infant formula. However, the differences in the nutritional composition of BC and mature milk, especially regarding proteins present in trace amounts, have not been comprehensively studied. Furthermore, the distinct proteomic profiles of mature milk derived from the first lactation (Milk-L1) and the second lactation (Milk-L2) are not fully understood. To address these gaps, this study aims to uncover the subtle differences in protein compositions of BC, Milk-L1, and Milk-L2 by proteomics. Compared with BC, anti-microbial proteins β-defensins and bovine hemoglobin subunit were up-regulated in Milk-L1, while Milk-L2 exhibited higher levels of enteric β-defensin, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1, sydecan-2, and cysteine-rich secretory protein 2. Additionally, immune proteins such as vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4B, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR), and Ig-like domain-containing protein were found at higher levels in Milk-L1 compared with Milk-L2. The study provides a comprehensive understanding of the distinct proteomic profiles of BC, Milk-L1, and Milk-L2, which contributes to the development of protein ingredients for infant formula. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop