Strategies for Improving the Characteristics, Quality and Safety of Meat Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2533

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Agricultural Institute of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: meat science; meat products; meat quality; pigs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the field of food production and consumption, improving the characteristics, quality, and safety of meat products is a critical undertaking that affects both the industry and consumers. As demand for meat products continues to grow worldwide, developing effective strategies to improve their characteristics has become imperative for producers, regulators, and consumers. Improving the quality of meat products can significantly increase the products’ added value and thus the profitability of meat processing. The food industry is therefore constantly looking for new innovations in processing techniques that involve all stakeholders in the meat production chain, from the breeders who supply suitable raw materials to the processors and retailers. This Special Issue will address the relatively broad topic of meat product quality parameters. This Special Issue will also focus on the potential for quality improvements through innovative and alternative processing methods, such as the use and preparation of raw materials of different origins and species, different processing and storage conditions, and the use of a variety of additives, both microbial (starters, microbial inoculants) and chemical (e.g., preservatives, antioxidants). In addition, this Special Issue will discuss the possibility of replacing individual ingredients (e.g., with different fats, components of plant origin, and natural bioactive compounds) and study the interactions between characteristics regarding biochemical composition, texture, and sensory quality within the content of toxins, pathogens, or spoilage indicators.

Dr. Martin Škrlep
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • processing techniques
  • quality improvement
  • innovations
  • sanitary quality
  • nutritional quality
  • meat products
  • meat processing
  • raw materials
  • additives
  • biochemical composition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 325 KiB  
Article
Polyphenols-Enrichment of Vienna Sausages Using Microcapsules Containing Acidic Aqueous Extract of Boletus edulis Mushrooms
by Melinda Fogarasi, Maria Jenica Urs, Maria-Ioana Socaciu, Floricuța Ranga, Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc, Dan Cristian Vodnar, Vlad Mureșan, Dorin Țibulcă, Szabolcs Fogarasi and Carmen Socaciu
Foods 2024, 13(7), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13070979 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1431
Abstract
Polyphenols are ubiquitous by-products in many plant foods. Their intake has been linked to health benefits like the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. These bioactive compounds can be successfully extracted from Boletus edulis mushrooms with acidic water. However, such extract [...] Read more.
Polyphenols are ubiquitous by-products in many plant foods. Their intake has been linked to health benefits like the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. These bioactive compounds can be successfully extracted from Boletus edulis mushrooms with acidic water. However, such extract could influence the sensory or textural properties of the product to be enriched; this inconvenience can be avoided by microencapsulating it using spray drying. In this study, the Vienna sausages were reformulated by replacing 2% of the cured meat with microcapsules containing an acidic aqueous extract of Boletus edulis mushrooms and by replacing ice flakes, an ingredient that represents 22.9% of the manufacturing recipe, with ice cubes from the same extract aiming to obtain a polyphenol enriched product. The results showed a higher content of polyphenols in sausages with extract (VSe; 568.92 μg/g) and microcapsules (VSm; 523.03 μg/g) than in the control ones (455.41 μg/g), with significant differences for 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, and 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose. However, because of the oxidative stress caused to the microcapsules by the extract’s spray drying, VSm had the highest oxidation state. PV and TBARS levels varied with storage time in all formulations, but given the short period tested, they were well below the allowed/recommended limit. The extract, as such, negatively affected the appearance, odor, and taste of Vienna sausages. The microcapsules, instead, determined an increase in their acceptance rate among consumers; they also prevented moisture loss and color changes during storage. In conclusion, microcapsules are more suitable for use as a polyphenol enrichment ingredient in Vienna sausages than the extract. Full article
14 pages, 2820 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Emulsifying Property and Oxidative Stability of Myofibrillar Protein-Diacylglycerol Emulsions Containing Catechin Subjected to Different pH Values
by Yuexin Li, Hui Wang, Yubo Zhao, Qian Chen, Xiufang Xia, Qian Liu and Baohua Kong
Foods 2024, 13(2), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020253 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 791
Abstract
Myofibrillar protein–diacylglycerol emulsions containing catechin (MP-DAG-C) possess outstanding emulsifying property and oxidative stability. However, the effect of pH on MP-DAG-C emulsions should be revealed to provide possibilities for their application in practical meat products. Therefore, MP-DAG-C emulsions at different pH values were used [...] Read more.
Myofibrillar protein–diacylglycerol emulsions containing catechin (MP-DAG-C) possess outstanding emulsifying property and oxidative stability. However, the effect of pH on MP-DAG-C emulsions should be revealed to provide possibilities for their application in practical meat products. Therefore, MP-DAG-C emulsions at different pH values were used in this study, in which lard, unpurified glycerolytic lard (UGL), and purified glycerolytic lard (PGL) were used as the oil phases. The results indicated that the emulsifying property of the UGL- and PGL-based emulsions increased compared to those of the lard-based emulsions (p < 0.05). The emulsifying activity and stability indices, absolute value of ζ-potential, and rheological characteristics increased with the increase in pH values (p < 0.05), with the droplets were smallest and distributed most uniformly at a pH of 6.5 compared to the other acidic environment (p < 0.05). The thiobarbituric acid substance and carbonyl content increased (p < 0.05), while the total sulfydryl content decreased (p < 0.05) during storage. However, there was no statistical difference between the oxidative stability of the MP-DAG-C emulsions with different pH values (p > 0.05). The results implied that the emulsifying property of MP-DAG-C emulsions increased with an increase in pH values. The oxidative stability of the MP-DAG-C emulsions at high pH values was improved by catechin. Full article
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