Health Benefits of Probiotics and Prebiotics in Functional Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2024) | Viewed by 959

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: food science and technology; food safety; functional foods; human nutrition; gut microbiota
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Science, University of Vigo, Vigo, Spain
Interests: sustainable process; agro-industrial residues; added-value products; isolation and characterization; innovative extraction methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Probiotics are a class of microorganisms; their reasonable intake has beneficial effects on the body. Prebiotics are mainly oligo- or polysaccharides that are not easily digested by human enzymes. They exert beneficial effects when they are used by beneficial bacteria in the colon to inhibit harmful bacteria, stimulate cell vitality, and enhance human immunity.

With the rapid development of food science, probiotics and prebiotics research and applications have also broadened and deepened. Over time, people's health consciousness has become more prominent, and healthier and multifunctional foods are favored by people. Therefore, functional foods containing prebiotics and probiotics should be developed in the future. At the same time, through the industrial production of probiotic products, some crucial research avenues include how to strengthen the stability of the physiological functions of bacteria, improve the product quality, and verify and detect the physiological effects of probiotics. In addition, new ways to obtain them are employed, such as as the exploitation of agro-industrial wastes to produce high-value prebiotic compounds.

It is believed that with more relevant research, probiotics and prebiotics can be better applied in the field of functional foods and introduce health benefits to people.

This Special Issue aims to gather original research articles and reviews related to probiotics and prebiotics in functional foods.

Dr. Alejandra Cardelle Cobas
Dr. Beatriz Gullon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • probiotics
  • prebiotics
  • functional foods
  • gut microbiota
  • human health

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 5567 KiB  
Article
Profiling the Gut Microbiota in Obese Children with Formula Feeding in Early Life and Selecting Strains against Obesity
by Cong Liang and Lan-Wei Zhang
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1379; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091379 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 678
Abstract
Formula feeding, obesity and the gut microbiota are closely related. The present investigation explored the profiles of the intestinal microbiota in obese children over 5 years old with formula feeding in early life. We identified functional bacteria with anti-obesity potential through in vitro [...] Read more.
Formula feeding, obesity and the gut microbiota are closely related. The present investigation explored the profiles of the intestinal microbiota in obese children over 5 years old with formula feeding in early life. We identified functional bacteria with anti-obesity potential through in vitro and in vivo experiments, elucidating their mechanisms. The results indicated that, in the group of children over 5 years old who were fed formula in early life, obese children exhibited distinct gut microbiota, which were characterized by diminished species diversity and reduced Bifidobacterium levels compared to normal-weight children. As a result, Lactobacillus acidophilus H-68 (H-68) was isolated from the feces of the N-FF group and recognized as a promising candidate. H-68 demonstrated the ability to stimulate cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion in STC-1 cells and produce bile salt hydrolase. In vivo, H-68 promoted CCK secretion, suppressing food intake, and regulated bile acid enterohepatic circulation, leading to increased deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid levels in the ileum and liver. This regulation effectively inhibited the diet-induced body weight and body fat gain, along with the liver fat deposition. In conclusion, H-68 was recognized for its prospective anti-obesity impact, signifying an auspicious pathway for forthcoming interventions targeted at averting pediatric obesity in formula-fed children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Probiotics and Prebiotics in Functional Foods)
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