Applications of Chromatography and Spectroscopy in Food Analysis

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1093

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chromatography and spectroscopy techniques have been revolutionizing food analysis, enabling the precise identification and quantification of bioactive compounds. These compounds, though present in small quantities in foods and natural products, exhibit various bioactivities such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-depressant, and anti-microbial properties that extend beyond basic nutritional standards, influencing our health. Consequently, there has been a significant surge in evaluating the biological impact of bioactive components on health and their extensive utilization in commercial sectors like pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food processing industries. Various techniques, including high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), mass spectrometry (MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy, among others, have been instrumental in processing bioactive compounds from their sources to industries. Recent advancements have introduced sophisticated chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques for purifying and characterizing bioactive compounds from diverse sources such as plants, marine organisms, microorganisms, and fruit and vegetable waste. Furthermore, chromatography and spectroscopy play a crucial role in authenticating and detecting food fraud and adulteration by identifying contaminants, pesticides, and harmful substances, ensuring food security. They also provide insights into the metabolic pathways and interactions of bioactive compounds within biological systems. This Special Issue aims to compile a comprehensive collection of articles highlighting the versatility and significance of chromatography and spectroscopy in advancing the field of food analysis and bioactive compounds. Topics covered include novel approaches for food authentication, the profiling of bioactive compounds, metabolomics and foodomics, regulatory compliance and method validation, the integration of data analytics and chemometrics, sustainable practices in food analysis, applications in functional foods and nutraceuticals, and future perspectives and emerging technologies in food analysis. This Issue explores the intricate world of bioactive compounds, presenting the latest advancements, challenges, and applications in the field.

Dr. Kavita Sharma
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)
  • gas chromatography (GC)
  • mass spectrometry (MS)
  • nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
  • infrared (IR) spectroscopy
  • bioactive compounds
  • food analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 2570 KiB  
Article
Elimination of Toxic Solvents from Analytical Methods in Food Analysis: Caffeine Determination in Tea as an Example
by Oktawia Kalisz, Aleksandra Jaworska, Sylwia Studzińska and Szymon Bocian
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1189; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081189 - 13 Apr 2024
Viewed by 714
Abstract
This study presents an innovative method for caffeine determination in tea, employing ethanol as the sole organic solvent for both SPE sample preparation and chromatographic analysis. This approach aligns with green chemistry principles, as confirmed by a comparative study highlighting ethanol’s safety and [...] Read more.
This study presents an innovative method for caffeine determination in tea, employing ethanol as the sole organic solvent for both SPE sample preparation and chromatographic analysis. This approach aligns with green chemistry principles, as confirmed by a comparative study highlighting ethanol’s safety and eco-friendliness compared to traditional solvents. The experiments validate ethanol’s efficacy in caffeine extraction and chromatographic analysis, minimizing environmental impact and eliminating toxicity risks. Utilizing a reduced chromatography column enhances the method’s efficiency and sustainability, resulting in a low limit of quantitation (0.125 μg/mL) and good reproducibility (RSD < 2.5%). Based on tea from the Polish market, the findings reveal the caffeine content (19.29–37.69 mg/g) and endorse ethanol’s role in enhancing sustainable chemical analysis in food science. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Chromatography and Spectroscopy in Food Analysis)
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